Former Hospital Site Project takes big step forward

Council endorses site master plan as well as base funding and amenities for community centre

The redevelopment project of the former Oakville-Trafalgar Memorial Hospital lands took a significant step forward at a Special Meeting last night when Town Council endorsed an overall master plan for the lands as well as the some programming and features for the Southeast Oakville Community Centre that is planned for the site.

“It is important for Council that our plan for the hospital lands reflect the needs and wishes of local residents,” said Mayor Burton. “We appreciate the thoughtful insight provided by community members throughout this consultation process, which has helped staff draft a plan that Council can fully support.”

Recently, residents from across Oakville were invited to share their thoughts on three proposed land use concepts for the overall site at a community workshop and through an online discussion forum. All three land use concepts include a community centre, a park and residential development but the arrangement was slightly different in each option.

While the feedback received was extensive both in person and online, there was no clear consensus on one particular option. However, certain themes and a common concept of establishing distinct districts did emerge with a residential district in the north, a civic district with a community centre and park in the middle, and a seniors-oriented housing district in the south.

With that in mind, the Council-endorsed former Oakville-Trafalgar Hospital Site Master Plan includes:

A residential area that complements the existing neighbourhood and maintains the character of the community as intended in the official plan.
A civic area that consolidates the community centre and parkland along Reynolds Street since it is the busiest street bounding the site, and allows the park space to be open, follow the principles of safe-park design and be highly accessible. The town also wants to explore the creation of a visible civic square in the area around the former high school. With Council’s approval of the master plan, exploration for re-use of the building will be required.
A seniors-oriented housing area that gives options for residents to down-size to smaller, more manageable properties or dwelling units without the need to leave the community. The area could range from independent seniors-living to assisted-care. Further discussions with members of the community and stakeholders will be needed to help define these opportunities.

The final master plan was also fully endorsed at last night’s meeting by the resident associations in Ward 3.

“What residents made clear during the consultation process is that the former hospital and high school played a critical role in anchoring and contributing to the neighbouring community’s identity,” added Mayor Rob Burton. “As such, the final master plan reflects the idea of maintaining that legacy for years to come.”

At last night’s meeting, Council also approved the following enhancements for the new Southeast Community Centre on the site expansion of the single gym to a double gym ($470,000); therapeutic warm-water pool ($2,740,000); fitness centre ($2,550,000) and; an indoor walking track ($1,800,000). These features are in addition to the amenities already planned for the community centre: indoor pool (to replace Centennial Pool), multi-purpose rooms and space for intergenerational programming.

A financial overview on the project was also received by Council which estimates the cost for entire project, including demolition, parking garage enhancements and community centre development, to be approximately $54 million. Town reserves are a primary funding source for this project. The sale of lands not used for a community centre or park is intended to replenish funding used from the reserve. This strategy is one way to ensure sufficient funding for other large, long term projects across the town in the future.

Moving ahead, the demolition contractors will begin site preparation this summer. The overall demolition and site remediation will take approximately 12 months to complete. The architectural/general contractor team responsible for the community centre will be selected in early July. The process of design will begin shortly afterwards. The development of the new community centre will begin in late 2018 with an opening scheduled for fall 2020.

A number of Planning Act approvals will also be necessary in order for the redevelopment of the site to proceed including official plan and zoning amendments, and draft plan of subdivision/site plan approvals. Amendments to the town’s Official Plan and Zoning By-law will be subject to the statutory planning process and a public meeting is expected in the fall with proposed Official Plan updates by the end of 2017.

The town plans on engaging with the public later this fall on the project including progress on the demolition work and next steps regarding the design of the community centre design and potential uses of the park.

Check out the June 27 Special Council Agenda for detail, including staff reports. For more information and to sign up for the town’s newsletter.


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Former Hospital Site Project takes big step forward

OMB rules ClubLink’s development application for Glen Abbey complete

Thursday, June 22, 2017 – for immediate release

OMB rules ClubLink’s development application for Glen Abbey complete

Town must begin application review process despite Interim Control By-law remaining in effect

One month after the Ontario Municipal Board (OMB) decided that the town’s Interim Control By-law (ICBL) and its one year extension were appropriate and necessary to understand the implications of ClubLink’s proposed development at Glen Abbey, the OMB has decided on a separate motion that the Glen Abbey development application is complete as of the date of the Board’s Decision on June 7, 2017. Under the Planning Act, the town now has 120 days to consider and decide on the merits of the application for rezoning (October 5, 2017), and 180 days to consider and decide on the merits of the application for an official plan amendment (December 4, 2017) to permit the complete redevelopment of the Golf Course. If the town does not make a decision within this timeframe, ClubLink would be in a position to appeal its applications directly to the OMB for decision.

“Council is very disappointed that less than one month after a decision that recognized that the town’s comprehensive planning studies underway were valid and necessary given the magnitude of the Glen Abbey proposal, another Board decision says that we must accept development applications for processing,” Mayor Burton said. “No doubt our residents are confused by this decision, but the town will move forward to review the application within the timelines established under the Planning Act.”

Jane Clohecy, commissioner, Community Development noted that the town is still moving forward on the next steps required to implement the cultural heritage landscape assessments and urban structure review planning studies that were approved by Council on May 15, 2017 and June 12, 2017 respectively.

“While the town is disappointed with this latest decision, it does not change the fact that the town’s ICBL remains in place, and no substantive changes to the land use at Glen Abbey property can take place before the town’s planning studies have been completed,” Clohecy noted. “We fully anticipate using the results of the planning studies underway to assess the merits of the proposed redevelopment of the lands.”

ClubLink’s development proposal will now be reviewed through the town’s development review process in order to make a recommendation to Council within the Planning Act timelines. This process includes public notice and feedback on the applications:

ClubLink’s development application is now posted to the town’s website so that members of the public may register for official notices and provide feedback.
Signs will be posted on the perimeter of the golf course site shortly indicating that a development proposal has been submitted to the town.
A public information meeting will held in mid-July to help explain the application and to receive public comments.
A report outlining the staff recommendation to Council will be posted on the website prior to the application being considered by Council for review by the public.
Members of the public may provide feedback in writing or in person any time before a final decision is made by the Planning and Development Council.

For more information, visit our Interim Control By-law and Glen Abbey Development Planning Studies pages.


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OMB rules ClubLink’s development application for Glen Abbey complete

Town urges residents to use caution around waterfront

Thursday, May 11, 2017 – for immediate release

Town urges residents to use caution around waterfront

Lake Ontario levels continue to rise with more rain expected this weekend

Lake Ontario levels continue to rise and with more rain expected this weekend, the Town of Oakville is urging residents to use caution around Oakville and Bronte Harbours.

“It’s extremely important for residents to be very careful if they are near the lake when the levels are so high,” said Andy Glynn, deputy fire chief with the Oakville Fire Department. “In some areas the elevated water combined with wave activity and power boat wakes is eroding the shoreline and creating slippery and dangerous conditions.”

Staff continue to inspect the harbours as well as lakefront parks and trails on a daily basis and some areas remain cordoned off due to safety concerns. Large areas of both harbours have been sandbagged due to water overtopping seawalls and staff are ensuring that piers are closed when wind and waves may create unsafe conditions.

Lake levels are currently much higher than normal and will likely continue to rise over the next few days. This will cause flooding in nearby low lying areas along Lake Ontario.

If water threatens to flood structures or roadways, please contact ServiceOakville at 905-845-6601 or ServiceOakville@oakville.ca.


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Town commissioning outdoor public art for Trafalgar Park Community Centre

Tuesday, May 2, 2017 – for immediate release

Town commissioning outdoor public art for Trafalgar Park Community Centre

Professional Canadian artists invited to submit Expressions of Interest by June 15

The Town of Oakville is looking for a professional artist to create a permanent outdoor public artwork as part of the redevelopment of Oakville Arena and Trafalgar Park. The successful artist will have their work featured at the north entrance of the redeveloped facility which will be renamed the Trafalgar Park Community Centre.

“Public art is accessible to everyone and reflects the vibrancy and richness of the Oakville community,” said Mayor Rob Burton. “This an exciting opportunity for an artist to create a unique piece of artwork that will live on in the community for years to come.”

Professional Canadian artists and artist-led teams are invited to submit Expressions of Interest by June 15, 2017. During stage one of the competition, applicants will be reviewed based on the merit of past work, professional qualifications and experience. In phase two shortlisted artists will be required to submit an artwork concept proposal and model.

The public art concept will be selected by an independent committee made up of visual arts professionals, community representatives and town staff. The project will be awarded in September, installed during the summer of 2018 and unveiled when the Trafalgar Park Community Centre opens to the public in September 2018.

Oakville Arena, located at 133 Rebecca Street, was originally built in 1950 and has served as a community hub for more than six decades. It’s also one of only four remaining arenas in Ontario with a distinctive wooden truss roof system designed by Norman Otto Hipel, an Ontario politician and builder who patented the roof system in 1928. Following extensive public consultation, Council approved a resident-supported plan to revitalize and expand the facility while maintaining its historical features.

The project will expand the existing Oakville Arena to a 65,500 square foot community centre while retaining the arena’s wooden roof trusses. The community centre will include an NHL-size ice pad, a seniors’ centre, public meeting space, fitness centre, full-size gymnasium, and an indoor running track. Trafalgar Park will feature a fully accessible playground with a shade structure, a double tennis court that will be converted into an artificial outdoor rink in the winter, and exterior washroom facilities.

For more information visit our Public Art and Exhibitions page.


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Town commissioning outdoor public art for Trafalgar Park Community Centre

Council moves Former Hospital Site Project into the next phase

Community Workshop on land use options scheduled for June 1

At a Special Meeting on Tuesday night concerning the redevelopment of the former Oakville-Trafalgar Memorial Hospital lands, Council approved the five-year review of the Parks, Recreation, Libraries Facilities Master Plan (Master Plan) and directed staff to report back on a parks and open space strategy to address issues and opportunities for future park acquisition. Council also received three staff reports on the former hospital site project including a financial overview, information on the new Southeast Oakville Community Centre, and proposed options for the overall site master plan.

Council gave staff the green light to seek public feedback on three land use options for the site. Staff will report back to Council on the results of the community consultation process at the June 27 Special Meeting of Council. Council also referred a final decision on the community centre’s base funding and program enhancements to the June 27 meeting and requested staff to report back on potential sponsorship opportunities for the centre.

“Oakville is one step closer to adding yet another community centre and even more parkland with the redevelopment of the former hospital site,” said Mayor Rob Burton. “Now, we’re looking for input from residents as we decide how best to arrange the parking garage, community centre, park and residential development on these lands.”

Residents from across Oakville are invited to share their feedback on the proposed land use concepts for the overall site at a June 1 community workshop. In the meantime, residents can also email their feedback to formerhospitalsite@oakville.ca. An online discussion forum will be coming out later in May.

While all three land use concepts include the community centre, a park and residential development, the arrangement is slightly different in each options. The concepts also adhere to a number of key principles derived from earlier public feedback and the town’s Official Plan such as placing the new community centre close to a park and the existing parking garage; incorporating a “green connection” for pedestrian access through the site; conserving heritage aspects of the former Oakville-Trafalgar High School (OTHS); protecting the Chimney Swift colony; as well as ensuring new development is compatible with the neighbouring community and consistent with the Livable Oakville Plan policies.

Council also heard from staff about several potential community centre enhancements that were identified during public consultation. The most frequently requested items and their potential costs include: expansion of the single gym to a double gym ($450,000); therapeutic warm-water pool ($2,340,000); fitness centre ($2,460,000) and; an indoor walking track ($1,800,000). These features are in addition to the amenities already planned for the community centre: indoor pool (to replace Centennial Pool), multi-purpose rooms and space for intergenerational programming. Council referred the decision on the base funding and the optional program enhancements to the June 27 Special Meeting of Council.

While not recommended in the Master Plan, members of the Oakville Aquatics Club spoke at the meeting requesting a 50 meter pool for the community centre. Town Council asked they return to Council with financing associated with their request as well as fundraising potential.

Background

The former site of the Oakville-Trafalgar Memorial Hospital (OTMH) was part of the town’s overall 2013 South Central Public Lands Study (SCPLS) which reviewed a number of key sites owned by the town in south central Oakville (e.g. surplus school sites, Oakville Arena) and made recommendations about their future use, including recreation uses. The town is working with community partners to create a vibrant new community centre, park, and future residential areas site to meet the needs of Oakville residents.

This summer contractors will begin site preparation for the safe demolition of the former hospital and Helen Lawson buildings. The overall demolition and site remediation will take approximately 12 months to complete. Development of the new community centre will begin in late 2018 with an opening scheduled for fall 2020.

For more information and to sign up for email updates from the town, please visit our Former Hospital Site Project page.


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Council moves Former Hospital Site Project into the next phase

Town looking at short-term accommodation licensing in Oakville

Wednesday, May 3, 2017 – for immediate release

Town looking at short-term accommodation licensing in Oakville

Share your thoughts at May 9 Open House

How would you regulate short-term accommodation companies, like Airbnb? Community members are invited to an open house on Tuesday, May 9 to provide input into a proposed licensing bylaw.

Currently, short-term accommodations in Oakville are only allowed in properly zoned hotels and, bed and breakfasts. Despite that, nightly rentals offered through online platforms such as Airbnb, Flipkey and Homeaway are on the rise in improperly zoned areas of the town. At Council’s direction in the fall 2016, staff are studying short-term accommodation rentals in Oakville and how other municipalities are regulating it.

“Council wants to implement policy on short-term rentals that protects the livability and vitality of our communities,” said Mayor Rob Burton. “To do that effectively, we’re looking to residents to share with us their experience and insight into how this form of accommodation is affecting Oakville’s neighbourhoods.”

The town wants to consider both the needs of property owners, and residents of nearby short-term accommodations. During the open house residents can provide feedback on whether short-term accommodations should be permitted, and what rules and regulations they would like considered into a proposed by-law. Staff will be on hand to answer questions and gather comments.

A staff report to Council on September 25, 2017 will present the results of the public consultation process, information on the nature and impacts of the local short-term accommodation market, and recommendations on a proposed approach for short-term accommodation regulations for Oakville.

The May 9 open house takes place in the Black Box Room, Queen Elizabeth Park Community and Cultural Centre, 2309 Bridge Road. Residents can drop in any time between 6:30 and 8 p.m.

Anyone unable to attend the open house is encouraged to share their comments by completing the town’s online survey or email enforcementservices@oakville.ca.

Residents with accessibility needs who want to attend the open house are asked to contact Margaret Boswell by May 7 at 905-845-6601 ext. 3350 (TTY: 905-338-4200) or margaret.boswell@oakville.ca. If preferred, residents can fill in the online feedback form.

For more information, our Short Term Accommodation Licensing By-law Review page.


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Town looking at short-term accommodation licensing in Oakville

Town achieves highest standard in performance data collection

Tuesday, May 2, 2017 – for immediate release

Town achieves highest standard in performance data collection

ISO 37120 Platinum certification reflects commitment to transparency and innovation

Oakville joins the ranks of cities across the globe after receiving the prestigious ISO 37120 platinum certification, the world’s first international standard for sustainable cities, from the World Council on City Data (WCCD). Oakville is the fourth Ontario municipality to receive this designation, and is the first International Organization of Standardization (ISO) achievement for the town.

“This certification is a significant achievement for Oakville that reflects Council’s commitment to innovation and transparency as we work to create Canada’s most livable town,” Mayor Rob Burton said. “Our involvement with the WCCD will help us measure how well we’re meeting the needs of our citizens, track our progress over time and benchmark our performance against other world-class cities.”

ISO 37120 Sustainable Development of Communities: Indicators for City Services and Quality of Life is comprised of 100 performance indicators that track a city’s progress in delivering services and ensuring quality of life for its community. Platinum certification acknowledges that the town has achieved the highest standard in data collection and research to drive the delivery of high quality programs and services to the community.

As a global leader on standardized metrics, the WCCD manages the ISO 37120 certification system and Global Cities Registry that hosts data from approximately 40 cities around the world, to enable a municipality and its residents to compare its social, economic and environmental performance in relation to other cities. Data now available shows that Oakville is leading the way in areas including the number of higher education degrees per 100,000 population (about one in two citizens has a higher education degree), total electrical energy use per capita (Oakville is one of the most efficient communities) and total number of bike paths/lanes per 100,000 population (among the highest of cities worldwide).

There is a wide range of certification levels offered by the WCCD for cities to aspire to and levels are based on the number of indicators reported by the city. To achieve platinum certification, the highest level, the town provided data on over 90 indicators that was validated through a third-party verification process.

During her presentation to Council, Dr. Patricia McCarney, president and CEO of World Council on City Data, commended the town’s commitment open data and efforts to pursue certification. “It is my pleasure to welcome the Town of Oakville to the World Council on City Data as an ISO 37120 platinum certified municipality. The dedication of Mayor Burton, Town Council and staff to open, standardized and comparable city data will help to increase the quality of life for all citizens while driving evidence-based decision making and data driven solutions. The town stands out in Canada and globally as a leader in working to create a more smart, sustainable, resilient, inclusive and prosperous future for its residents.”

Quick Facts

The WCCD was founded in 2014 – ISO 37120 was piloted by 20 WCCD Foundation Cities throughout the world
Based on eight years of development by the Global City Indicators Facility and later the Global Cities Institute at the University of Toronto
ISO 37120 is the first ISO standard on cities
Comprises 100 indicators (54 core, 46 supporting) around 17 themes on city sustainability and quality of life

To view Oakville’s data and to learn more about ISO 37120, visit the World Council on City Data website. To learn more about the town’s commitment to open data, visit our Open Data page..


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Council approves age-friendly study and recommendations

Wednesday, April 12, 2017 – for immediate release

Council approves age-friendly study and recommendations

Oakville is a good place to live for older adults and seniors and offers a variety of opportunities for all ages to stay active and engaged in their community, according to the results of an Age-friendly Baseline Study approved by Council on April 3.

“An age-friendly community not only improves the quality of life of seniors, it creates a more inclusive, safe and accessible place to live for everyone,” said Mayor Rob Burton. “This study will help the town develop policies, programs and services that support residents as they get older.”

The study is part of the town’s efforts to become a more age-friendly community where residents feel engaged, enjoy good health and participate fully in society. It assesses the town’s current strengths, opportunities and gaps based on eight age-friendly community domains identified by the World Health Organization: outdoor spaces and buildings, transportation, housing, respect and social inclusion, civic participation and employment, communication and information, community support and health services, and social participation.

As part of the assessment, 522 residents completed a questionnaire, interviews and focus groups were held with key stakeholders, and a public open house generated numerous ideas for making Oakville friendlier to an aging population.

Overall, the study findings are positive with 91 per cent of questionnaire respondents rating Oakville as a “very good” or “good” place to live. Residents reported a positive sense of community, an overall feeling of safety in Oakville and access to a broad range of services, programs, activities and events available to older adults. Residents also identified barriers to age-friendliness including access to affordable housing and public transportation and feelings of ageism and being undervalued.

The town’s next steps towards becoming a more age-friendly community include establishing an internal working group to develop a plan for implementing the town’s age-friendly initiatives, researching best practice in other municipalities and continuing to raise awareness of the importance of supporting residents as they age.

To read the complete report, visit our Age-friendly Baseline Study page.


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Council approves age-friendly study and recommendations

Spring loose leaf collection starting April 18

Tuesday, April 11, 2017 – for immediate release

Spring loose leaf collection starting April 18

The Town of Oakville’s annual spring loose leaf collection will run from Tuesday, April 18 to Friday, April 28, 2017 in designated neighbourhoods. Information on collection zones and dates can be found on our spring loose leaf collection page or by calling ServiceOakville at 905-845-6601.

Residents are reminded to follow the town’s loose leaf collection guidelines and keep leaf piles separate from any woody debris including large twigs, brush and branches.

Loose Leaf Collection Guidelines

Place all loose leaves on the boulevard or on the shoulder, not over catch basins or in the ditches in front of your house.
Make sure leaves are free of garbage or other yard waste materials.
Put leaves out no earlier than seven days before the first day of your pickup and no later than 7 a.m. on the first day of collection in your zone.
Remove contaminated piles of leaves or leaves that have been put out after the collection dates.

Bagged leaf and yard waste collection service is provided to all Oakville residents by Halton Region on regular garbage collection days from April 11 to December 5, 2017. This is a separate program from the Town of Oakville’s loose leaf collection service. Call 311 or visit halton.ca/waste for more information on curbside collection schedules.

For more information contact:

Mark Covert
Senior Manager, Works
Roads and Works
905-845-6601, ext. 4153
mark.covert@oakville.ca

Julie Trites
Senior Communications Advisor
Strategy, Policy and Communications
905-845-6601, ext. 3005
julie.trites@oakville.ca


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Spring loose leaf collection starting April 18

Nominations now open for 2017 Oakville Community Spirit Awards

Wednesday, March 1, 2017 – for immediate release

Nominations now open for 2017 Oakville Community Spirit Awards

The Town of Oakville is once again honouring community champions who positively contribute to the life and spirit of the town. Nominations are now open for the 16th Annual Community Spirit Awards recognizing outstanding individuals, groups and businesses in seven categories.

Nominations will be accepted until Monday, April 10 at 4 p.m. in the following award categories:

Access Award, sponsored by Access Abilities
Arts Award, sponsored by The Oakville Beaver
Group Volunteer Award, sponsored by the Town of Oakville
Heritage Award, sponsored by Genworth Financial Canada
Individual Volunteer Award, sponsored by Paradiso Restaurant
Senior Award, sponsored by Chartwell Waterford Retirement Residence
Youth Award, sponsored by RBC Royal Bank

This year’s Community Spirit Awards presentation will be held on Wednesday, June 7, 2017, at Oakville’s Queen Elizabeth Park Community and Cultural Centre (QEPCCC). The 2017 Community Spirit Awards will be designed by local illustrator, designer and portrait artist Emily Soden. Emily works closely with oil, acrylic scratchboard and pencils, but her favourite mediums are watercolour and ink. Her commissions are inspired by nature and animals, often showcased as recurring themes in her work.

Nomination forms are available at all town recreation facilities, Town Hall and Oakville Public Library branches, or can be completed online. For more information visit the Community Spirit Awards page.


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Nominations now open for 2017 Oakville Community Spirit Awards