Burlington Celebrates Tourism Week in Canada 2019

Did you know that Tourism is a $97 billion industry in Canada and is a key…

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Burlington Celebrates Tourism Week in Canada 2019

Canada’s Largest Ribfest Aug 30-Sept3

For 23 years, Canada’s Largest Ribfest has become a Labour Day weekend tradition here in Burlington.  So why…

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Canada’s Largest Ribfest Aug 30-Sept3

Holiday Gift Guide 2017

There is no denying that the holidays are coming and if you’re like us and…

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Holiday Gift Guide 2017

This Weekend in Burlington – June 3/4

Can you believe it’s June already? The month of May gave us a taste of…

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This Weekend in Burlington – June 3/4

Council recognizes four significant cultural heritage landscapes in Oakville

Wednesday, May 17, 2017 – for immediate release

Council recognizes four significant cultural heritage landscapes in Oakville

$150,000 additional funding approved to undertake Phase Three: Implementation of Protection Measures

Council recognized four Oakville properties as significant cultural heritage landscapes at its Planning and Development Council meeting Monday night. The four properties are:

Raydor Estate/Glen Abbey at 1333 Dorval Drive
Bowbeer Farmstead at 1086 Burnamthorpe Road East
Hilton Farm at 2013 North Service Road West
Biggar Farm at 4243 Sixth Line

The four properties will now be subject to Phase Three implementation work led by town staff to identify and recommend to Council potential measures to safeguard the heritage attributes of these properties.

Council’s decision took into account advice from town heritage staff, detailed information, analysis and opinions provided by external experts led by Letourneau Heritage Consulting, as well as input from landowners, the Heritage Oakville Advisory Committee and the public.

“The expert assessments and the staff report were very convincing in identifying how the four properties met the criteria to be recognized as significant cultural heritage landscapes,” Mayor Burton said. “We look forward to hearing back from staff, the public and the landowners on how we can best protect the heritage importance of these properties moving forward.”

Council’s decision continues the implementation of the town’s Cultural Heritage Landscapes Strategy, endorsed by Council in January 2014. These four properties were identified as high priority sites for further study in the Phase One Cultural Heritage Landscape Inventory endorsed by Council in February 2016. Last night’s actions concluded Phase Two Cultural Heritage Landscape Assessments for these properties. Council approved $150,000 in additional funding for Phase Three, which will include assistance from independent experts. 1333 Dorval Drive (Glen Abbey Golf Course/RayDor Estate) remains a high priority for completion.

Council also approved a staff recommendation that no further action be taken as part of the Cultural Heritage Landscape Strategy on two other properties that had been identified as high priority sites in the Phase One Inventory, Rivaz Farm at 3367 Dundas Street West and the Van Sickle Farm at 3451 Tremaine Road. These properties, while not identified as significant cultural heritage landscapes, were identified to have significant built heritage resources that may warrant protection. Two other high priority properties which are owned by the town, Bronte Harbour (3014 Lakeshore Road West) and Bronte Bluffs (35 West River Street) will be subject to Phase Two assessments in the coming months.

A cultural heritage landscape is a geographical area of heritage significance that has been modified by human activities and is valued by a community for the important contribution they make to our understanding of the history of a place, an event, or a people. The Provincial Policy Statement requires that significant cultural heritage landscapes be conserved.

For more information visit our Cultural Heritage Landscapes strategy page.


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Council recognizes four significant cultural heritage landscapes in Oakville

Town commissioning outdoor public art for Trafalgar Park Community Centre

Tuesday, May 2, 2017 – for immediate release

Town commissioning outdoor public art for Trafalgar Park Community Centre

Professional Canadian artists invited to submit Expressions of Interest by June 15

The Town of Oakville is looking for a professional artist to create a permanent outdoor public artwork as part of the redevelopment of Oakville Arena and Trafalgar Park. The successful artist will have their work featured at the north entrance of the redeveloped facility which will be renamed the Trafalgar Park Community Centre.

“Public art is accessible to everyone and reflects the vibrancy and richness of the Oakville community,” said Mayor Rob Burton. “This an exciting opportunity for an artist to create a unique piece of artwork that will live on in the community for years to come.”

Professional Canadian artists and artist-led teams are invited to submit Expressions of Interest by June 15, 2017. During stage one of the competition, applicants will be reviewed based on the merit of past work, professional qualifications and experience. In phase two shortlisted artists will be required to submit an artwork concept proposal and model.

The public art concept will be selected by an independent committee made up of visual arts professionals, community representatives and town staff. The project will be awarded in September, installed during the summer of 2018 and unveiled when the Trafalgar Park Community Centre opens to the public in September 2018.

Oakville Arena, located at 133 Rebecca Street, was originally built in 1950 and has served as a community hub for more than six decades. It’s also one of only four remaining arenas in Ontario with a distinctive wooden truss roof system designed by Norman Otto Hipel, an Ontario politician and builder who patented the roof system in 1928. Following extensive public consultation, Council approved a resident-supported plan to revitalize and expand the facility while maintaining its historical features.

The project will expand the existing Oakville Arena to a 65,500 square foot community centre while retaining the arena’s wooden roof trusses. The community centre will include an NHL-size ice pad, a seniors’ centre, public meeting space, fitness centre, full-size gymnasium, and an indoor running track. Trafalgar Park will feature a fully accessible playground with a shade structure, a double tennis court that will be converted into an artificial outdoor rink in the winter, and exterior washroom facilities.

For more information visit our Public Art and Exhibitions page.


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Town commissioning outdoor public art for Trafalgar Park Community Centre

Draft Cultural Heritage Landscapes assessments completed on six high-priority properties

Thursday, April 13, 2017 – for immediate release

Draft Cultural Heritage Landscapes assessments completed on six high-priority properties

Report will go to Heritage Oakville Advisory Committee on Tuesday, April 25, 2017

The Town of Oakville today released the draft Phase Two Cultural Heritage Landscape Assessments undertaken on six high-priority properties identified for further study by the Phase One Cultural Heritage Landscape Inventory endorsed by Council on February 2016. The research for this phase of the project was undertaken by Letourneau Heritage Consulting.

A cultural heritage landscape is a geographical area of heritage significance that has been modified by human activities and is valued by a community for the important contribution they make to our understanding of the history of a place, an event, or a people. The six properties considered in this phase of the project were:

Bowbeer Farmstead (1086 Burnhamthorpe Road East)
Raydor Estate / Glen Abbey (1333 Dorval Drive)
McMichael Farm (3367 Dundas Street West)
Hilton Farm (2031 North Service Road West)
Biggar Farm (4243 Sixth Line)
Remnant Farmstead (3451 Tremaine Road)

The report on the draft Phase Two Cultural Heritage Landscapes Assessments will be considered by Heritage Oakville Advisory Committee on April 25, 2017. The meeting will take place at Town Hall, Council Chamber, beginning at 9:30 a.m. The recommendations from Heritage Oakville and staff will go forward to Council for consideration at its meeting of May 15, 2017.

“The town’s Heritage Oakville Advisory Committee has a critical role to play in reviewing the evidence provided by the heritage consultant in this phase of the process,” Mayor Burton said. “Council looks forward to receiving the committee’s advice and feedback.”

The Provincial Policy Statement requires that significant cultural heritage landscapes be conserved. Phase Two assessments provide an evidentiary basis, if any, on which Council could proceed with any protection measures in Phase Three, such as Official Plan policies or designation under the Ontario Heritage Act.

To register to speak at the Heritage Oakville Advisory Committee meeting of April 25, 2017, please call 905-815-6015 or email townclerk@oakville.ca by 4:30 p.m. the day prior to the meeting.

To register to speak at the Planning and Development Council meeting of May 15, 2017, please call 905-815-6015 or email townclerk@oakville.ca by noon the day of the meeting.

For more information visit our Cultural Heritage Landscapes strategy page.


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Draft Cultural Heritage Landscapes assessments completed on six high-priority properties

Town prepares for reconstruction of Lakeshore Road Bridge at Sixteen Mile Creek

Wednesday, January 18, 2017 – for immediate release

Town prepares for reconstruction of Lakeshore Road Bridge at Sixteen Mile Creek

Bridge closes the week of January 30; reopens December 2017

During the week of January 30, 2017, the Lakeshore Road Bridge over Sixteen Mile Creek will be closed until December 2017 to motorists, cyclists and pedestrians in both directions. The bridge is being reconstructed as part of the overall Lakeshore Road Reconstruction and Streetscape project.

A detour route around the bridge will be provided via Kerr Street, Rebecca Street and Navy Street. All businesses, the library, the theatre and Centennial Pool remain open and accessible during construction.

“The town is moving forward with a much needed project to reconstruct Lakeshore Road East starting with the bridge. Changing the streetscape in downtown Oakville will help pave the way for a revitalized downtown,” said Mayor Rob Burton. “We appreciate everyone’s patience during construction and remind you that it is business as usual in downtown Oakville.”

Once complete, the new bridge will include two travel lanes and bikes lanes. There will also be a wider pedestrian sidewalk with a barrier wall to separate the sidewalk and vehicular traffic. New pedestrian railings and lookouts will be included as well as LED lighting. The Lakeshore Road approaches to the bridge between Navy Street and Forsythe Street will also be reconstructed.

On January 5, 2017, in preparation for the bridge closure, Navy Street was permanently converted to two-way traffic between Lakeshore and Rebecca/Randall streets. Signs are posted around the area to notify drivers of the change. As part of the Council approved Downtown Transportation and Streetscape Study (DTS), Navy Street is one of several streets in downtown Oakville scheduled to be converted to two-way operation. The other streets are still in the detailed design phase and are scheduled to be converted in 2018.

Another addition to Downtown Oakville is the new pedestrian crossover device at the intersection of Navy Street and Church Street (in front of Centennial Square). Several new crossovers are planned to be installed across town in 2017 starting with the Navy and Church street location. Pedestrian crossovers have specific pavement markings and crossing signs. There are three types of crossovers. The crossover at Navy and Church has poles, flashing beacons above the signs and pedestrian push buttons. Unlike pedestrian crosswalks at traffic signal locations, at a crossover, drivers and cyclists must stop behind the yield line and wait until the pedestrian completely crosses the road before proceeding.

With Lakeshore Road East (Navy Street to Allan Street) coming to the end of its lifespan and needing a major reconstruction, the town undertook extensive research and public consultation to identify broader opportunities to improve traffic, beautify streets and improve pedestrian/cycle ways in the downtown. In October 2015, Council approved the Lakeshore Road Reconstruction and Streetscape Project as part of the Downtown Transportation and Streetscape Study (DTS) study. The Lakeshore Bridge at Sixteen Mile Creek reconstruction is taking place in advance of the road project as inspections of the bridge revealed its condition warrants immediate attention.

For details about this project, please visit the Lakeshore Road Bridge Reconstruction page. Additional information will be posted online as the projects progress. You can also contact ServiceOakville at 905-845-6601.


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Oakville introduces licensing by-law to regulate Transportation Network Companies

Tuesday, December 13, 2016 – for immediate release

Oakville introduces licensing by-law to regulate Transportation Network Companies

At the December 12, 2016, meeting, Town Council approved a new licensing by-law allowing Transportation Network Companies (TNC) to operate legally in Oakville. The new regulations focus on health and safety and consumer protection, and ensure that residents continue to have safe, reliable and consistent transportation options when travelling in Oakville.

“We know that the app-based technology used by companies like Uber is here to stay, and that many Oakville residents already use these services,” Mayor Rob Burton said. “This new by-law ensures proper oversight of these services while addressing both community and consumer needs.”

The new by-law comes after a year of extensive research, best practice reviews of other municipal regulations, and public and stakeholder consultation to determine appropriate licensing options for TNCs. Oakville joins other cities in the province including Niagara Region, Ottawa, Toronto, and Waterloo Region to enact TNC licensing by-laws.

The town’s licensing framework places accountability on TNCs to ensure that any driver using their platform is operating in compliance with the town’s by-law. Regulations include:

TNCs must provide the town’s Enforcement Services with driver and vehicle information to ensure electronic compliance checks can be done.
An annual, tiered licensing fee structure that is based on the number of vehicles the TNC is operating in Oakville.
TNCs must give passengers the cost range of the trip, description of the vehicle, license plate number, driver name and photo before the trip starts.
Criminal reference checks for all drivers is mandatory.
A safety standards certificate from a licensed Ontario mechanic for each vehicle operating under a TNC is required.
All vehicles operating under a TNC must be identifiable with a window marking.
Street hailing of TNC vehicles is prohibited. All trips must be booked in advance through the TNCs mobile app.
TNCs are required to provide accessible mobile apps.
The age limit of TNC vehicles is seven years.

With these regulations in place for TNCs, town staff will continue to assess the impact of ridesharing services on the taxi cab industry and will present a new taxi by-law to Council for consideration in 2018.

For more information, review the staff report in the December 5, 2016 Administrative Services Committee agenda.


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Oakville introduces licensing by-law to regulate Transportation Network Companies

Town moving ahead with redevelopment plans for the Former Hospital Site

Learn more at open house and give input at community centre consultation sessions on December 1, 2016

Much progress has been done on the redevelopment plans for the former hospital (OTMH) site and the town is inviting residents to attend an open house on December 1 at Town Hall to learn more. The town also encourages residents to take part in one of two interactive consultation sessions that day into the new community centre proposed for the site.

“Council believes community engagement and public consultation are key to a successful redevelopment,” Mayor Rob Burton said. “That’s why we are encouraging residents from across Oakville to receive up-to-date information and share their ideas at the upcoming open house and consultation.”

The Former Hospital Site Project is divided into three phases. In the new year, the town will be entering into Phase 3, which is about reinventing the site. This phase involves demolishing the buildings, conducting a community needs assessment, determining the appropriate location for the centre and park, and developing a plan for potential housing on any remaining lands.

In addition, the Local Health Integration Network (LHIN) is undertaking a third party study on the future health needs of the Halton area which will include the area surrounding the former hospital site. The study will address residents request for consideration of local healthcare services provided in the area. Once the results of the study are known, the town and the LHIN will further investigate opportunities for joint programming at the former hospital site including opportunities related to a health hub.

Demolition is anticipated to start in mid-2017 and take eight to 12 months to complete. The development of the community centre will take three years to complete with an opening scheduled for September 2020.

As part of the town’s Parks, Recreation and Library Facilities Master Plan, the proposed amenities of the community centre include an indoor pool (to replace Centennial Pool), gymnasium, youth space, active living space, multi-purpose space and community rooms. The public consultation meetings on December 1 will focus on confirming these amenities prior to the start of design in 2017.

“We believe that community centres and the recreation experiences they provide play a vital role in supporting individual, family and community wellbeing,” said Colleen Bell, commissioner of Community Development. “We want you to engage in conversations with us about what the centre will provide. Your input will give us valuable information we need to create a centre that meets the needs of all residents.”

Since taking possession in April 2016, a number of in-depth studies of the buildings and the land have been completed to better understand the site. The town has:

assessed the hospital buildings for hazardous materials and for any potential site contamination.
completed structural assessments of the parking garage and the former Oakville Trafalgar High School (OTHS) – a designated heritage resource.
completed public consultation on the on-street parking restrictions in the area, and
established a non-binding Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) between the town and the Mississauga Halton Local Health Integration Network (LHIN) regarding the potential concept of a community health hub in town.

To learn more about what’s been done on the site, and what’s coming up, residents can drop into the open house in the South Atrium at Town Hall on December 1, 2016, anytime between 5 to 7 p.m.

For those who want to provide input into the community centre proposed amenities, there are two consultation sessions being held in the Bronte/Palermo Rooms before and after the open house. One from 3:30 to 5:30 p.m. and a second one from 7 to 9 p.m. on December 1, 2016.

If you plan to attend the open house or consultation sessions and have any accessibility needs, please let us know before December 1 by contacting ServiceOakville at 905-845-6601 or by filling out the online accessible feedback form.

The former site of the Oakville-Trafalgar Memorial Hospital (OTMH) was part of the town’s overall South Central Public Lands Study (SCPLS) which reviewed a number of key sites owned by the town in south central Oakville (e.g. surplus school sites, Oakville Arena) and made recommendations about their future use, including recreation uses. The Former Hospital Site Project is about the town working with our community partners to create a vibrant new community centre, park, and potential future housing to meet the needs of Oakville residents. The Former Hospital Site Project is about completing this work over five years (2015 to 2020).

The former site consists of lands on the south side of Macdonald Road between Reynolds Street and Allan Street. The property includes the existing hospital building and the Wyndham Manor Long Term Care Centre.

For more information and to sign up for email updates from the town, please visit the former hospital site project page. You can also email any questions to formerhospitalsite@oakville.ca or contact ServiceOakville at 905-845-6601.


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Town moving ahead with redevelopment plans for the Former Hospital Site