Freeman Station

Freeman Station is one of the last surviving Grand Trunk Railway stations, following the loss of…

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Freeman Station

Heritage Matters in #BurlON

Our lovely city of Burlington has a rich heritage-structural, oral and cultural. If you’re looking…

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Heritage Matters in #BurlON

#BurlON Celebrates Canada’s 150th

1514The Canada 150 excitement is building!  Throughout 2017 we are encouraging visitors to discover #BurlON…

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#BurlON Celebrates Canada’s 150th

Council approves Fire Master Plan

Monday, November 21, 2016 – for immediate release

Council approves Fire Master Plan

On November 14, 2016, Council approved a Fire Master Plan that will ensure Oakville’s fire services will meet the future needs of the growing community. The plan will guide the delivery of fire protection and emergency services over the next ten and fifteen years.

“The safety of our community is of utmost importance,” said Mayor Rob Burton. “With this plan in place, residents can be assured that the Oakville Fire department will continue to provide an exceptional level of service as our community expands.”

The Fire Master Plan includes an assessment of all operations and divisions within the Oakville Fire department including fire stations and trucks, staffing, apparatus and equipment, fire prevention and public education programs, communications and emergency planning.

Included in the plan’s 43 recommendations is the addition of a new station (Station 8) near the intersection of Bronte Road and Pine Glen Road and the future relocation of Station 9 from its current location on Neyagawa Boulevard closer to the intersection of Burnhamthorpe Road and Sixth Line. These recommendations are aimed at addressing the growth of new neighbourhoods in North Oakville as well as increased development in existing areas of town.

The Fire Master Plan was developed based on stakeholder and public input, community needs as well as current research and best practice. It includes strategies and recommendations that are consistent with the master planning processes outlined by the Office of the Fire Marshal and the Emergency Management, Ontario (OFMEM).

“Our focus is reducing fires and safety risks by optimizing three lines of defense – public education and prevention, safety standards and enforcement and emergency response,” said Fire Chief, Brian Durdin. “It’s a proactive strategy that helps keep the community safe, and helps manage the cost of fire suppression services.”

For more information, visit the Fire Master Plan page.


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Canada’s Largest Ribfest 2016

Over the past 21 years, Canada’s Largest Ribfest has become a Labour Day weekend tradition here in Burlington.  In 2009, Ribfest broke attendance records with over 175,000 in attendance, over 150,000 lbs of ribs sold and over $3 million dollars has been … Continue reading →

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Canada’s Largest Ribfest 2016

Lisa Loeb to headline 2016 Oakville Children’s Festival

Tuesday, April 19, 2016 – for immediate release

Lisa Loeb to headline 2016 Oakville Children’s Festival

Arts and culture celebration returns to Coronation Park on July 10, 2016

“Turn the radio on, turn the radio up” because Lisa Loeb will be “singing her songs” at the Oakville Children’s Festival on Sunday, July 10, 2016, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. at Coronation Park. Festival guests can expect fun and catchy kids’ tunes, as well as a few classics from the Grammy-nominated singer/songwriter turned children’s performer.

In addition to Lisa Loeb, the third annual Children’s Festival will also feature performances by the Big Nazo, FiddleFire, CORPUS’ Camping Royale, Gadfly Urban Street Dance Battle, Sing Along Tim and the Pacifiers, and magicians Ray Chance and Mike D’Urzo.

“It is such a pleasure to see this tremendous event offered to all Oakville families free of charge,” Mayor Rob Burton said. “I look forward to seeing you in July, as Coronation Park transforms into an arts and culture playground for kids of all ages.”

Exciting opportunities for inspiration and learning will continue throughout the park with hands-on building and art activities, interactive shows, archery, beach volleyball, martial arts, YMCA of Oakville skateboard ramp, face painting, vintage fire truck, Safari Science, Monkeynastix, City Parent Fun Zone and Scavenger Hunt, and more!

This year’s food features will include the Kinsmen Club of Oakville BBQ lunch, plus 10 of the GTA’s most popular food trucks. Residents and out-of-town guests are encouraged to take the free Oakville Transit shuttle service from the Bronte GO Station. Free bike parking will also be available onsite.

Looking to volunteer? The 2016 Oakville Children’s Festival committee is currently recruiting enthusiastic volunteers to help with this year’s festival. Apply online or email ocfvolunteers@oakville.ca for details.

Festival admission is free and the event will take place rain or shine. Additional acts and activities will be announced as they are confirmed. Visit the Oakville Children’s Festival page for regular updates.


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Council approves 1.66 per cent overall tax increase

Tuesday, December 15, 2015 – for immediate release

Council approves 1.66 per cent overall tax increase

Oakville Council unanimously approved a 2.4 per cent increase to the town’s portion of the tax bill. When combined with the expected regional increase and estimated education tax rates the overall property tax increase is 1.66 per cent or $14.14 per $100,000 of assessment. This means a home assessed at $400,000 would pay an additional $56.56 per year or $1.09 per week.

“Once again, we have kept our promise to keep tax increases in line with inflation while providing the programs, services and infrastructure support expected by our community,” said Mayor Burton. “Oakville has become one of the best municipalities at keeping its tax increase low.”

The approved $371 million combined operating and capital budget provides a wide range of programs and services including winter road maintenance, parks and trails, harbours, transit, emergency services, recreation and culture, senior services, libraries, and to keep the town’s roads and community facilities in a state of good repair.

Some program enhancements recommended for 2016 include funding for the first year of a multi-year transit service plan, the introduction of the Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) system in town libraries, and increased resources to meet recreational program demands. There’s also an additional $3,600 for the Oakville Arts Council grant funding and $3,600 for Sports Oakville grant funding for local groups. In addition, Council agreed to the Budget Committee’s recommendation to cut $83,900 in Council related costs from the budget.

The Capital Budget and 2016-2025 Capital Budget and Forecast sees $99.4 million of funding in 2016 and just over $1 billion for capital requirements over the next 10 years with a focus on transportation, infrastructure renewal and other elements related to growth. Nearly half of the Oakville portion of the increase is related to infrastructure maintenance and repair.

Some of the key capital projects for 2016 include:

Road Resurfacing and Preservation Program — $7.8 M
Cornwall Road Widening Chartwell to Morrison — $7.3 M
Oakville Trafalgar Memorial Hospital Demolition — $4.2 M
Emerald Ash Borer Management Program — $3.7 M
Bridge Road Improvements between Warminster and Fourth Line — $3 M
Sixteen Mile Creek West Shore Landscape Rehabilitation — $2 M
Speers Road widening from the GO Station west of Third Line to Fourth Line — $2 M

“Many municipal increases are 50 per cent higher than Oakville’s overall increase. We are providing programs and services our residents want in a fiscally sustainable manner and are investing in our infrastructure at the same rate that it depreciates,” said Budget Chair Tom Adams. “Overall, this is a responsible and proactive budget. We are keeping taxes in line with inflation, debt under control, and infrastructure in good working order.”

For details visit the 2016 Budget page.


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Council approves 1.66 per cent overall tax increase

2016 Budget Committee recommends 1.66 per cent overall tax increase

Proposed budget to go to Council for approval on Monday, December 14, 2015

Achieving Council’s direction to keep the overall property tax increase in line with inflation, Oakville’s 2016 Budget Committee has recommended a 2.4 per cent increase to the town’s portion of the tax bill. If approved, residents would see an overall increase to their property tax bill of 1.66 per cent in 2016 including the expected regional increase and estimated education tax rates. The proposed increase would see residential property taxes increase by $14.14 per $100,000 of assessment meaning that a home assessed at $400,000 would pay an additional $56.56 per year or $1.09 per week. The recommendation will go before Council for approval on Monday, December 14, 2015.

“Many municipal increases are expected to be 50 per cent higher than the town’s overall increase,” said 2016 Budget Chair Councillor Tom Adams. “This recommended budget strikes a healthy balance between offering valued services and programs, making strategic investments in infrastructure and community priorities, and keeping the overall tax increase in-line with inflation. Nearly half of the Oakville portion of the increase is related to infrastructure maintenance and repair.”

In the town’s Draft 2016 Budget, staff is recommending a $371 million combined operating and capital budget to provide a wide range of programs and services including winter road maintenance, parks and trails, harbours, transit, emergency services, recreation and culture, senior services, libraries, and to keep the town’s roads and community facilities in a state of good repair.

Some program enhancements recommended for 2016 include funding for year one of the Transit Service Plan, the introduction of the Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) system in town libraries, and increased resources to meet recreational program demands. The Budget Committee also recommended an additional $3,600 in Oakville Arts Council grant funding and $3,600 for Sports Oakville grant funding for local groups. In addition, the committee recommended cutting $83,900 in Council related costs from the proposed budget.

In October, the Budget Committee reviewed the town’s Draft 2016 Capital Budget and 2016-2025 Capital Budget and Forecast which sees $99.4 million of funding in 2016 and just over $1 billion for capital requirements over the next 10 years with a focus on transportation, infrastructure renewal and other elements related to growth.

Some of the key capital projects for 2016 include:

Road Resurfacing and Preservation Program — $7.8 M
Cornwall Road Widening Chartwell to Morrison — $7.3 M
Oakville Trafalgar Memorial Hospital Demolition — $4.2 M
Emerald Ash Borer Management Program — $3.7 M
Bridge Road Improvements between Warminster and Fourth Line — $3 M
Sixteen Mile Creek West Shore Landscape Rehabilitation — $2 M
Speers Road widening from the GO Station west of Third Line to Fourth Line — $2 M

“Providing the programs and services for our residents in a fiscally sustainable manner is a key priority for Council,” said Mayor Rob Burton. “Over the past several years we have worked hard at meeting this goal and as such Oakville has become one of the best municipalities at keeping its tax increase low,” said Mayor Burton.

Residents who wish to appear before Council as a delegate at the December 14 meeting may register in person at the meeting, or in advance by emailing townclerk@oakville.ca or calling 905-815-6015. For those who cannot attend the meetings, they are streamed live on TownTV.

If you would like to attend a meeting and have any accessibility needs please email townclerk@oakville.ca or 905-815-6015 or fill out the accessible online feedback form.

For more details and information about the recommended 2016 Operating and Capital budget visit the 2016 Budget page.


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2016 Budget Committee recommends 1.66 per cent overall tax increase

Town is in strong financial shape

Thursday, July 17, 2014 – for immediate release

Town is in strong financial shape

Oakville’s 2013 Annual Report available online

The Town of Oakville released its 2013 Annual Report today outlining the town’s fiscal strength and key achievements in meeting the needs of the community.

“2013 was a year full of positive momentum in Oakville,” Mayor Rob Burton said. “Oakville’s continued financial strength has allowed us to create a cleaner, greener, more livable town with lower rates of growth in population and taxes. We believe a steady focus on increasing efficiency, value and livability will keep paying off for everyone.”

The town’s Consolidated Financial Statements are audited by KPMG who have confirmed that they present fairly the town’s strong financial position.

The annual report also describes the town’s major accomplishments in 2013 such as the development of our new comprehensive zoning by-law to guide what, when and how buildings can be constructed in Oakville and the launch of the Downtown Plan project to rejuvenate our downtown streetscapes, transportation and cultural facilities. Both initiatives are set out in the town’s Vision 2057 plan.

Other highlights from the past year include the unveiling of the town’s new memorial wall at George’s Square; hosting the RBC Canadian Open and starting construction on our North Operations Depot that will be home to Roads and Works, Parks and Open Space and an interim Fire Station which will enhance services for residents in north Oakville. The town also launched new online tools such as the Ethics and Efficiency Hotline, Report a Problem tool, and released datasets through the Open Data project.

The audited financial statements are presented in accordance with the Canadian Public Sector Accounting Standards, and prescribed policies issued by the Ministry of Municipal Affairs and Housing. An annual report with its audited Consolidated Financial Statement presents the financial position of the town and its consolidated entities for the 2013 fiscal year with its achievements.

The 2013 Annual Report as well as the town’s Municipal Performance Measurement Program, can be reviewed on the Annual Report page.


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Budget Committee recommends lowest tax increase in 15 years

Thursday, December 12, 2013 – for immediate release

Budget Committee recommends lowest tax increase in 15 years

Proposed budget to go to Council for approval on Monday December 16, 2013

Achieving Council’s direction to keep the total property tax increase in line with inflation, Oakville’s 2014 Budget Committee has recommended a 2.11 per cent total increase to the town’s portion of the tax bill. This recommendation will go before Council for approval on Monday, December 16, 2013. If approved by Council, Oakville residents would see an overall increase to their property tax bill of 0.83 per cent in 2014, the lowest such increase in 15 years.

“This recommended budget meets Council’s goals to invest in maintaining Oakville’s infrastructure, reduce tax-supported debt, and keeps the overall tax increase in line with inflation,” said 2014 Budget Chair Councillor Tom Adams. “Residents will benefit from improvements in roads, parks, snow plowing and youth after school programming, and a new Operations Depot and Fire Station 9 in north Oakville. We are spending wisely and building healthy reserves as we plan for the future.”

According to Nancy Sully, deputy treasurer and director of Financial Planning, the reduction from staff’s original proposal for a 2.93 per cent increase in the town’s share of the tax bill to the recommended 2.11 per cent was a result of a larger than forecast increase in assessment growth. When the town’s portion of the tax bill is combined with the regional and education tax levy, it results in the proposed 0.83 per cent increase on the property tax bill.

Some of the top capital projects influencing this year’s budget are:

$6.3 million for road resurfacing and preservation
$5.1 million for parks and harbours rehabilitation and development
$3.6 million for the Emerald Ash Borer management program
$2.9 million for transit buses
$2.8 for the North Service Road expansion at Ford Drive
$2.3 million to secure lands for a future fire station in north Oakville

Residents who wish to appear before Council as a delegate at the December 16, 2013, meeting should register by emailing townclerk@oakville.ca or calling 905-815-6015. All Budget Committee meetings are held at Town Hall, 1225 Trafalgar Road and are open to the public. For those who cannot attend the meetings in person, they will be streamed live on TownTV. For more information visit the 2014 Budget page. 

Media contacts:

Nancy Sully
Deputy Treasurer and Director of Financial Planning
905-845-6601, ext. 3143
nsully@oakville.ca


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Budget Committee recommends lowest tax increase in 15 years