#BurlON Nov9-15

Remembrance Day is this Saturday and it’s a time for us  to reflect on all…

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#BurlON Nov9-15

OMB approves Bronte Green application for development of former Saw-Whet Golf Course lands

Thursday, July 6, 2017 – for immediate release

OMB approves Bronte Green application for development of former Saw-Whet Golf Course lands

Decision approves settlement negotiated last fall

The Ontario Municipal Board (OMB) has released its decision formally approving the negotiated settlement that was reached between the Town of Oakville, the Region of Halton, Conservation Halton and Bronte Green last fall concerning the development of the lands at 1401 Bronte Road.

“The OMB’s decision to approve the town’s settlement with Bronte Green was the best possible outcome that we could achieve at the OMB,” Mayor Burton said. “In the settlement, Bronte Green agreed to significant concessions to respond to all of the issues raised by the town including protecting green space and addressing key environmental concerns over wildlife and flood protection. While it would have been desirable to preserve all this land, legally that was simply not possible in this case.”

The approved development proposal permits Bronte Green to build a residential community with limited retail, and a mix of single family homes, townhouses and low-rise apartments located on Bronte Road. This proposed transit-friendly community will also include a school, parks and a trail system while preserving sensitive environmental lands that are critical habitat to endangered and other species of wildlife.

The town had opposed the original Bronte Green application as being premature and not in the public interest. This position was based on serious concerns with the draft plan and the underlying technical studies. The town engaged a team of 15 witnesses representing a variety of scientific and planning disciplines to put forth its case.

Following extensive negotiations, Bronte Green made significant changes to its original development proposal to reflect the concerns raised by the Town of Oakville, Region of Halton, Conservation Halton and the community. These changes included:

Dedicating a significant parcel of land to enhance the woodlands
Creating a high value habitat for species including snapping turtles.
Increasing the size of the buffer around the natural features from 10 to 30 metres in order to better protect the natural heritage system from the impacts of development and to reduce flood and erosion impacts.
Constructing storm water management systems which insure that there will be no additional risk of downstream flooding.
Removing the vehicular bridge previously proposed over the Fourteen Mile Creek which posed a threat to endangered species of fish.
Securing a permanent natural heritage linkage to Bronte Creek Provincial Park.
Reserving an elementary school site adjacent to a centrally located neighbourhood park.
Increasing density on portions of the site to support transit-friendly development along Bronte Road, and preserve more parkland

For more information visit the Bronte Green Corporation development application page.


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OMB approves Bronte Green application for development of former Saw-Whet Golf Course lands

Council approves 1.99 per cent overall tax increase

Tuesday, December 13, 2016 – for immediate release

Council approves 1.99 per cent overall tax increase

Town Council met its goal to keep overall tax increases in line with inflation with the approval of the 2017 Budget at the Council meeting on December 12, 2016. The approved 3.21 per cent increase to the town’s portion of the tax bill creates an overall 1.99 per cent tax increase when combined with the expected Halton Region increase and estimated education tax rates. The latest Toronto Consumer Price Index shows a 2.3 per cent annual increase. The budget also positions Oakville to keep overall tax increases in line with inflation out to 2020.

“Maintaining our strong, stable financial health is a critical part of Council’s vision for a more livable Oakville,” Mayor Rob Burton said. “This budget delivers the programs and services our residents expect and invests in our community’s infrastructure, while once again reflecting Council’s goal of keeping overall property tax increases consistent – and consistently low.”

The approved $310 million operating budget continues to provide Oakville with its existing wide range of programs and services. This includes maintenance of roads and community facilities, fire services, transit, parks and trails, recreation and culture programs, senior services, libraries, and a variety of other valued services. Some program enhancements for 2017 include improvements to by-law enforcement and implementation of changes to the private tree by-law to strengthen tree protection. The budget also allocates additional funds for Visit Oakville tourism, the town’s Heritage Grant program, and support for cultural programs and grants.

The approved 2017 capital budget includes $122.3 million in project funding and just over $1 billion in capital projects forecasted between 2017-2026 with a focus on transportation, infrastructure renewal and other elements related to growth. Some of the key capital projects for 2017 include:

Trafalgar Park and Oakville arena revitalization – $13 M
Lakeshore Road Bridge at Sixteen Mile Creek reconstruction – $10.5 M
Road Resurfacing and Preservation Program – $9.1 M
Former Oakville-Trafalgar Memorial Hospital demolition – $7.6 M
Phase 2 of LED streetlight conversion – $6.6 M
Preparations for Kerr Street widening and grade separation – $4.7 M
Expansion buses – $4.3 M
Speers Road widening from the GO Station West of Third Line to Fourth Line – $4 M
Emerald Ash Borer Management Program – $3.7 M

“The budget keeps overall taxes in line with inflation, invests significantly in building and maintaining infrastructure and positions Oakville for a strong and stable financial future,” Budget Committee Chair Tom Adams said. “Once again, we are addressing the needs of our community while providing the lowest overall property tax increase among neighbouring municipalities.”

For details visit the 2017 Budget page.


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Council approves 1.99 per cent overall tax increase

2017 Budget Committee recommends 1.99 per cent overall tax increase

Budget goes to Council for approval on Monday, December 12, 2016

Achieving Council’s direction to keep the overall property tax increase in line with inflation, Oakville’s 2017 Budget Committee recommended a 3.21 per cent increase to the town’s portion of the tax bill, which produces an overall increase of 1.99 per cent when the expected Halton Region increase and educational components are included. The latest Toronto Consumer Price Index shows an annual increase of 2.3 per cent. If approved by Council, the proposed change would increase residential property taxes by $16.48 per $100,000 of assessment, meaning that the owner of a home assessed at $700,000 would pay an additional $115.36 per year or $2.22 per week. The recommendation will go before Council for approval on Monday, December 12, 2016.

“The recommended budget reflects Council’s commitment to keep overall property tax increases in line with inflation,” Budget Committee Chair Tom Adams said. “Council is doing this at the same time it is investing in building and renewing community infrastructure. We also continue to deliver high quality programs and services, while making strategic improvements desired by the community.”

In the town’s Draft 2017 Budget, staff is recommending a $310 million operating budget to provide a wide range of programs and services including the maintenance of roads and community facilities, fire services, transit, parks and trails, recreation and culture, senior services, and libraries, along with a variety of other valued services. Program enhancements recommended for 2017 include improvements to by-law enforcement, implementation of changes to the private tree by-law to strengthen tree protection, additional funding of $50,000 for Visit Oakville tourism, $90,000 to support the Heritage Grant program and an additional $52,500 to support cultural programs and grants.

The Budget Committee recommended referring additional funding for introducing flashing 40 kilometre-per-hour traffic zone warning signs to the 2018 budget process. This was to permit time to review potential new rules that could allow the limited use of photo radar in school zones before making any further decisions. The committee also recommended re-allocating existing funds for Council’s town-wide newsletter to more ward-specific communications.

In November, the Budget Committee reviewed the town’s Draft 2017 Capital Budget which includes $122.3 million in funding in 2017 and just over $1 billion for capital projects between 2017-2026 with a focus on transportation, infrastructure renewal and other elements related to growth. The Budget Committee recommended moving forward an additional $500,000 in road resurfacing projects to 2017.

Some of the key capital projects for 2017 include:

Trafalgar Park revitalization – $13 M
Lakeshore Road Bridge at Sixteen Mile Creek reconstruction – $10.5 M
Road Resurfacing and Preservation Program – $9.1 M
Former Oakville-Trafalgar Memorial Hospital demolition – $7.6 M
Phase 2 of LED streetlight conversion – $6.6 M
Kerr Street widening and grade separation – $4.7 M
Expansion buses – $4.3 M
Speers Road widening from the GO Station west of Third Line to Fourth Line – $4 M
Emerald Ash Borer Management Program – $3.7 M

Councillor Adams also noted in today’s deliberations that staff are directed to prepare future budgets for 2018, 2019 and 2020 to align with Council’s existing direction to keep overall property tax increases in line with inflation.

“Council is committed to ensuring Oakville’s finances remain strong, stable and healthy as we work to make our town the most livable town in Canada,” Mayor Rob Burton said. “The recommended budget reflects this commitment and ensures long-term stability for our property taxes.”

Residents who wish to appear before Council as a delegate at the December 12 meeting may register in person at the meeting, or in advance by emailing townclerk@oakville.ca or calling 905-815-6015. For those who cannot attend the meetings, they are streamed live on the town’s YouTube channel.

If you would like to attend a meeting and have any accessibility needs please email townclerk@oakville.ca or 905-815-6015 or fill out the accessible online feedback form.

For more details, visit the 2017 Budget page.


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2017 Budget Committee recommends 1.99 per cent overall tax increase

Health needs study to begin to help pave way for potential community health hub

Tuesday, June 28, 2016 – for immediate release

Health needs study to begin to help pave way for potential community health hub

Town and LHIN form partnership through MOU

Town Council approved moving ahead with a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) between the Town of Oakville and the Mississauga Halton Local Health Integration Network (LHIN). The non-binding MOU outlines the scope and scale of a partnership between the town and the LHIN regarding the potential concept of a community health hub. Further work and analysis will be required before any binding agreement would be created for approval by Council.

“With the relocation of Oakville’s hospital, the town is exploring community health hubs as a new, integrative way to meet the healthcare needs of residents,” said Mayor Rob Burton. “This non-binding MOU provides the framework to more closely examine how we can meet our community’s needs now and in the years to come,” said Mayor Burton.

Some of the objectives of the MOU include:

The LHIN will undertake a third party study on the future health needs of the area surrounding the former hospital site. The study is the first step in response to resident request for consideration of local healthcare services provided in the area. Once the results of the study are known, the town and the LHIN will further investigate opportunities for joint programming at the former hospital site including opportunities related to a health hub.
The town and the LHIN will explore the possibility of the town leasing the Kerr Street Seniors Centre Site to the LHIN or LHIN designate. The town is planning on relocating the seniors centre to the new community centre the town is building as part of the Trafalgar Park revitalization – scheduled to open in mid-2018. Conceptually, the Kerr Street Seniors Centre Site could be used for a community health hub to complement the services provided at the new seniors’ facility.

Town staff will also continue to have discussions with the LHIN and Halton Region, who has indicated support for both the health study and exploration of health hub opportunities, to ensure that options align with the local public health and social services initiatives.

“We look forward to working with the Town of Oakville and with Halton Region to better understand the needs of the community in order to provide health care services where it’s needed most,” said Bill MacLeod, Chief Executive Office, Mississauga Halton LHIN.

The Mississauga Halton LHIN brings together local health care partners from a number of sectors including hospitals, community care and support services, mental health and addictions, community health centres, long-term care and primary care to develop innovative, collaborative solutions to improve access and enhance the experience of patients and clients.


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Health needs study to begin to help pave way for potential community health hub

Town of Oakville to introduce new ward boundaries for 2018 municipal election

Tuesday, June 21, 2016 – for immediate release

Town of Oakville to introduce new ward boundaries for 2018 municipal election

Council approves adoption of seven-ward option, pending increase to Regional Council representation

Town Council has unanimously voted to move forward on changing the town’s ward boundary system, pending an increase to Regional Council’s representation. The decision means that Oakville’s ward boundaries will increase from six to seven, with adjustments made to all existing wards, except Ward 3, to accommodate a seventh ward. The new Ward 7 captures neighbourhoods north of Dundas Street with Burlington as the boundary to the west, and Eighth Line as the boundary to the east. The new boundaries will be used to conduct the 2018 municipal election to reflect a Town Council of 14 councillors, plus Mayor.

“Updating our ward system is a necessary step to assure Oakville residents are represented effectively, as we anticipate an additional regional seat,” Mayor Rob Burton said. “Thanks to the work completed to date as part of our ward boundary review we are well-positioned to take that step.”

The new ward boundary model approved by Council at their May 30, 2016, meeting aligns with principles initially approved in 2012 as part of the town’s extensive ward boundary review, including:

effective representation
the protection of communities of interest and neighbourhoods
consideration of physical features as natural boundaries

Additionally, the new model reflects the federal numerical standard of 25 per cent as an acceptable percentage variation in population size among the town’s wards.

A report and by-law to re-draw ward boundaries and to create the new Ward 7 will be presented to Council for final approval this fall, following the approval of a Halton Region by-law to increase Oakville’s regional representation.

Residents are invited to review the new ward boundary map available at oakville.ca by accessing the staff report included in the May 30, 2016 Council meeting agenda or by visiting the Ward Boundary Review page. Questions can be sent to the Clerk’s department via email at wardboundary@oakville.ca or by mail to:

Town of Oakville – Clerk’s department
1225 Trafalgar Road
Oakville ON L6H 0H3


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Town of Oakville to introduce new ward boundaries for 2018 municipal election

Spring loose leaf collection starts April 18, 2016

Monday, April 11, 2016 – for immediate release

Spring loose leaf collection starts April 18, 2016

The Town of Oakville’s annual spring loose leaf collection will run from Monday, April 18 to Friday, April 29, 2016 in designated neighbourhoods. Information on collection zones and dates can be found on the Loose Leaf Collection page or by calling ServiceOakville at 905-845-6601.

Residents are reminded to follow the town’s loose leaf collection guidelines and keep leaf piles separate from any woody debris including large twigs, brush and branches.

Loose Leaf Collection Guidelines

Place all loose leaves on the boulevard or on the shoulder, not over catch basins or in the ditches in front of your house.
Make sure leaves are free of garbage or other yard waste materials.
Put leaves out no earlier than seven days before the first day of your pickup and no later than 7 a.m. on the first day of collection in your zone.
Remove contaminated piles of leaves or leaves that have been put out after the collection dates.

Bagged leaf and yard waste collection service is provided to all Oakville residents by Halton Region on regular garbage collection days from April 4 to December 8, 2016. This is a separate program from the Town of Oakville’s loose leaf collection service. Call 311 or visit the Region of Halton website for more information on curbside collection schedules.


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Spring loose leaf collection starts April 18, 2016

Town of Oakville and Halton Regional Police kick off school area Parking Safety Awareness campaign

Tuesday, February 23, 2016 – for immediate release

Town of Oakville and Halton Regional Police kick off school area Parking Safety Awareness campaign

Dropping off and picking up students in school areas can cause a lot of extra traffic congestion. Illegally stopped or parked cars are a safety risk as they make it hard for other drivers to see pedestrians, particularly children, crossing the street.

Starting this week, as part of an awareness campaign, the Town of Oakville and the Halton Regional Police Service (HRPS) will be visiting select Oakville schools to help educate drivers about school area safety and parking. Police and parking control officers will distribute informational cards to drivers with tips on recognizing the difference between No Stopping and No Parking restrictions, as well as information on new rules for stopping at crosswalks.

“We are dedicated to keeping our school areas safe not just for children, but for everyone,” said Jim Barry, senior manager of Enforcement Services. “School areas are busy, particularly at drop off and pick up times. Stopping, even momentarily, in a restricted zone endangers pedestrians and other drivers.”

Following the awareness days, officers who patrol school zones will enforce parking regulations, ticketing illegally stopped or parked vehicles. Parking tickets may be issued at the time of the violation or may be mailed to the registered owner of the vehicle.

The No Stopping sign is the most restrictive parking regulation. Once a vehicle has pulled over and ceased moving, even if it is occupied, it is deemed stopped. Stopping in a No Stopping zone could result in a $50 ticket. Parking in a No Parking zone, even if the vehicle is occupied, could result in a $40 ticket. Parking in a fire route could result in a $100 ticket.

To help reduce traffic issues in school areas, the town and HRPS recommend that parents and guardians:

use the school’s designated drop off and pick up area
keep clear of driveways, entrance ways, crosswalks and bus stops
consider other safe and active ways for children to get to school. A list of alternatives and programs can be found on the Halton Region Active and Safe Routes to School page

Residents can report traffic issues around their school area at serviceoakville@oakville.ca or 905-845-6601. For more information, visit the Parking Enforcement page.


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Town of Oakville and Halton Regional Police kick off school area Parking Safety Awareness campaign

What’s happening at Town Hall – October 26 to 30, 2015

Friday, October 23, 2015 – for immediate release

What’s happening at Town Hall – October 26 to 30, 2015

Do you want to know what’s happening at Town Hall? Are you interested in participating in local government? Here’s a highlight of what’s happening October 26 to October 30, 2015.

October 26

2016 Budget Committee 
Location: Town Hall, Council Chamber, 9:30 a.m.–12:30 p.m.

Council 
Location: Town Hall, Council Chamber, 7–10 p.m.

Standing Committee reports:
2016 Budget Committee – October 5, 2015
Community Services Committee – October 13, 2015
Administrative Services Committee – October 13, 2105
2016 Budget Committee – October 21, 2015

Consent items:
Permanent easements and temporary licenses to Region of Halton for the Lakeshore/Rebecca Trunk Sewer

Discussion items:
Mayor’s Annual Oakville status report
2016 Council and Standing Committee schedule
Council appointment to the CAO Review Committee
Interim Radiocommunications Facilities Protocol (Suncor Refinery)
Resolution for the Bank of Canada

What’s happening at Town Hall provides an overview of upcoming Town of Oakville meetings, important agenda items and other town events. The public is welcome to attend these meetings. For agendas and copies of reports, please visit the agendas and minutes page. For more information and additional upcoming meetings, please visit the Council calendar or news and notices page.


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What’s happening at Town Hall – October 26 to 30, 2015

Town of Oakville announces 2015 fall loose leaf collection schedule

Friday, October 02, 2015 – for immediate release

Town of Oakville announces 2015 fall loose leaf collection schedule

First collection day is Tuesday, October 13, 2015

The Town of Oakville’s annual fall loose leaf collection will run from Tuesday, October 13 to Friday, November 27, 2015 in designated neighbourhoods. Information on collection zones and dates can be found on the loose leaf collection page or by calling ServiceOakville at 905-845-6601.

Residents are reminded to follow the town’s loose leaf collection guidelines described below.

Collection guidelines

Place all loose leaves on the boulevard or on the shoulder, not over catch basins or in the ditches in front of your house.
Ensure leaves are free of garbage or other yard waste materials such as brush, branches, large twigs or stones.
Put leaves out no earlier than seven days before the first day of your pickup and no later than 7 a.m. on the first day of collection in your zone.

Contaminated piles of leaves or leaves that have been put out after the pickup dates will not be collected. Homeowners are responsible for removing uncollected leaves.

Bagged leaf service

Halton Region collects bagged leaves and yard waste on the same day as regular garbage pickup. This is a separate program from the Town of Oakville’s loose leaf collection. Visit Halton website for more information.

For more information on Oakville’s fall loose leaf collection, contact ServiceOakville at 905-845-6601 or serviceoakville@oakville.ca


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Town of Oakville announces 2015 fall loose leaf collection schedule