#BurlON til Jan 30

We’re at the end of January already! With the cold weather making its presence known…

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#BurlON til Jan 30

OMB rules ClubLink’s development application for Glen Abbey complete

Thursday, June 22, 2017 – for immediate release

OMB rules ClubLink’s development application for Glen Abbey complete

Town must begin application review process despite Interim Control By-law remaining in effect

One month after the Ontario Municipal Board (OMB) decided that the town’s Interim Control By-law (ICBL) and its one year extension were appropriate and necessary to understand the implications of ClubLink’s proposed development at Glen Abbey, the OMB has decided on a separate motion that the Glen Abbey development application is complete as of the date of the Board’s Decision on June 7, 2017. Under the Planning Act, the town now has 120 days to consider and decide on the merits of the application for rezoning (October 5, 2017), and 180 days to consider and decide on the merits of the application for an official plan amendment (December 4, 2017) to permit the complete redevelopment of the Golf Course. If the town does not make a decision within this timeframe, ClubLink would be in a position to appeal its applications directly to the OMB for decision.

“Council is very disappointed that less than one month after a decision that recognized that the town’s comprehensive planning studies underway were valid and necessary given the magnitude of the Glen Abbey proposal, another Board decision says that we must accept development applications for processing,” Mayor Burton said. “No doubt our residents are confused by this decision, but the town will move forward to review the application within the timelines established under the Planning Act.”

Jane Clohecy, commissioner, Community Development noted that the town is still moving forward on the next steps required to implement the cultural heritage landscape assessments and urban structure review planning studies that were approved by Council on May 15, 2017 and June 12, 2017 respectively.

“While the town is disappointed with this latest decision, it does not change the fact that the town’s ICBL remains in place, and no substantive changes to the land use at Glen Abbey property can take place before the town’s planning studies have been completed,” Clohecy noted. “We fully anticipate using the results of the planning studies underway to assess the merits of the proposed redevelopment of the lands.”

ClubLink’s development proposal will now be reviewed through the town’s development review process in order to make a recommendation to Council within the Planning Act timelines. This process includes public notice and feedback on the applications:

ClubLink’s development application is now posted to the town’s website so that members of the public may register for official notices and provide feedback.
Signs will be posted on the perimeter of the golf course site shortly indicating that a development proposal has been submitted to the town.
A public information meeting will held in mid-July to help explain the application and to receive public comments.
A report outlining the staff recommendation to Council will be posted on the website prior to the application being considered by Council for review by the public.
Members of the public may provide feedback in writing or in person any time before a final decision is made by the Planning and Development Council.

For more information, visit our Interim Control By-law and Glen Abbey Development Planning Studies pages.


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OMB rules ClubLink’s development application for Glen Abbey complete

Urban Structure Review: How will Oakville accommodate growth?

Have your say on draft Official Plan Amendments on May 30

Following extensive study and a series of public open houses, the town now has draft Official Plan Amendments that would see a newly revised Urban Structure section introduced into Town of Oakville’s Official Plan – the Livable Oakville Plan. The draft amendments would provide a framework for how the town will accommodate growth, while protecting greenspaces and established neighbourhoods from development pressure. Members of the public are invited to provide input into the amendments at one of two information meetings scheduled on May 30.

“It’s vital the town has a comprehensive urban structure in its official plan because it gives us a high level look at where new growth will be focused. It sets out the basis for making planning decisions about where we live, work and play,” said Mayor Burton “Feedback from our community has helped staff prepare the draft amendments in front of us. Before they go to Council for final approval, I encourage you to review them and share your comments.”

To connect with community members, the town will be hosting two public information meetings at Town Hall on Tuesday, May 30 where participants can provide feedback on the draft Official Plan Amendments. There is an afternoon session from 1:30 – 3:30 p.m. and an evening session from 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m.

The draft Official Plan Amendments would introduce a new Section 3 – Urban Structure and a corresponding detailed map A1 into the Livable Oakville Plan. These new sections would describe the importance and purpose of a town-wide urban structure and the major elements of that urban structure. The amendments would ultimately provide a framework for how the town will accommodate growth and establish the basis for official plan policy and for making planning decisions. The amendment would also introduce, under Part F – Implementation, criteria for evaluating site-specific official plan amendments and their potential impacts on the town’s urban structure. In addition to being incorporated into the Livable Oakville Plan, the draft amendments also provide for revisions to the North Oakville East and West Secondary Plans to align them with the changes to the Livable Oakville Plan.

The town must consider how to accommodate required growth given that development in all areas of the town is underway or planned. Instead of developing outward, the town needed to determine the best approach for managing development within the town’s existing boundaries.

As part of the ongoing five-year Official Plan Review, the town initiated an Urban Structure Review on February 16, 2016.

Oakville’s Urban Structure Review was a town-wide examination of natural heritage and open space lands, as well as mixed use, residential, commercial and employment lands to see if changes are necessary to accommodate growth to 2041.

The review studied the role of existing and emerging growth areas such as Midtown Oakville, the Trafalgar Road Corridor and the area surrounding the Bronte GO Station; the preservation of stable residential areas and the protection of natural and cultural heritage; the relationship between growth areas and the delivery of municipal infrastructure; and criteria for evaluation of new growth areas. The Urban Structure Review was also one of three land use policy studies required to be completed under Interim Control By-law 2016-024 restricting land uses on the Glen Abbey Golf Course.

Following the May 30 public information meetings, a statutory public meeting for the draft Official Plan Amendments will be held June 12, 2017 in conjunction with the Council meeting at Town Hall. A decision meeting by Council on the recommended Official Plan Amendments is expected in the fall.

The public may view documents and background material at the Planning Services department at Town Hall between 8:30 a.m. and 4:30 p.m., Monday through Friday, or on the town’s Official Plan Review pages on its website at oakville.ca.

An official plan is a legal document containing goals, objectives, and policies intended to guide land use, development and growth in a municipality. Oakville’s official plan is comprised of the Livable Oakville Plan and the North Oakville East and West Secondary Plans. The Planning Act requires a review of the official plan every five years. This is also called a municipal comprehensive review. For more information visit our Official Plan Review page.

Accessibility Requirements

Please advise Kirk Biggar, senior planner, one week before the meeting at 905-845-6601, ext. 3968 (TTY: 905-338-4200) or by email at kirk.biggar@oakville.ca if you have any accessibility needs.


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Town commissioning outdoor public art for Trafalgar Park Community Centre

Tuesday, May 2, 2017 – for immediate release

Town commissioning outdoor public art for Trafalgar Park Community Centre

Professional Canadian artists invited to submit Expressions of Interest by June 15

The Town of Oakville is looking for a professional artist to create a permanent outdoor public artwork as part of the redevelopment of Oakville Arena and Trafalgar Park. The successful artist will have their work featured at the north entrance of the redeveloped facility which will be renamed the Trafalgar Park Community Centre.

“Public art is accessible to everyone and reflects the vibrancy and richness of the Oakville community,” said Mayor Rob Burton. “This an exciting opportunity for an artist to create a unique piece of artwork that will live on in the community for years to come.”

Professional Canadian artists and artist-led teams are invited to submit Expressions of Interest by June 15, 2017. During stage one of the competition, applicants will be reviewed based on the merit of past work, professional qualifications and experience. In phase two shortlisted artists will be required to submit an artwork concept proposal and model.

The public art concept will be selected by an independent committee made up of visual arts professionals, community representatives and town staff. The project will be awarded in September, installed during the summer of 2018 and unveiled when the Trafalgar Park Community Centre opens to the public in September 2018.

Oakville Arena, located at 133 Rebecca Street, was originally built in 1950 and has served as a community hub for more than six decades. It’s also one of only four remaining arenas in Ontario with a distinctive wooden truss roof system designed by Norman Otto Hipel, an Ontario politician and builder who patented the roof system in 1928. Following extensive public consultation, Council approved a resident-supported plan to revitalize and expand the facility while maintaining its historical features.

The project will expand the existing Oakville Arena to a 65,500 square foot community centre while retaining the arena’s wooden roof trusses. The community centre will include an NHL-size ice pad, a seniors’ centre, public meeting space, fitness centre, full-size gymnasium, and an indoor running track. Trafalgar Park will feature a fully accessible playground with a shade structure, a double tennis court that will be converted into an artificial outdoor rink in the winter, and exterior washroom facilities.

For more information visit our Public Art and Exhibitions page.


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Town commissioning outdoor public art for Trafalgar Park Community Centre

Council moves Former Hospital Site Project into the next phase

Community Workshop on land use options scheduled for June 1

At a Special Meeting on Tuesday night concerning the redevelopment of the former Oakville-Trafalgar Memorial Hospital lands, Council approved the five-year review of the Parks, Recreation, Libraries Facilities Master Plan (Master Plan) and directed staff to report back on a parks and open space strategy to address issues and opportunities for future park acquisition. Council also received three staff reports on the former hospital site project including a financial overview, information on the new Southeast Oakville Community Centre, and proposed options for the overall site master plan.

Council gave staff the green light to seek public feedback on three land use options for the site. Staff will report back to Council on the results of the community consultation process at the June 27 Special Meeting of Council. Council also referred a final decision on the community centre’s base funding and program enhancements to the June 27 meeting and requested staff to report back on potential sponsorship opportunities for the centre.

“Oakville is one step closer to adding yet another community centre and even more parkland with the redevelopment of the former hospital site,” said Mayor Rob Burton. “Now, we’re looking for input from residents as we decide how best to arrange the parking garage, community centre, park and residential development on these lands.”

Residents from across Oakville are invited to share their feedback on the proposed land use concepts for the overall site at a June 1 community workshop. In the meantime, residents can also email their feedback to formerhospitalsite@oakville.ca. An online discussion forum will be coming out later in May.

While all three land use concepts include the community centre, a park and residential development, the arrangement is slightly different in each options. The concepts also adhere to a number of key principles derived from earlier public feedback and the town’s Official Plan such as placing the new community centre close to a park and the existing parking garage; incorporating a “green connection” for pedestrian access through the site; conserving heritage aspects of the former Oakville-Trafalgar High School (OTHS); protecting the Chimney Swift colony; as well as ensuring new development is compatible with the neighbouring community and consistent with the Livable Oakville Plan policies.

Council also heard from staff about several potential community centre enhancements that were identified during public consultation. The most frequently requested items and their potential costs include: expansion of the single gym to a double gym ($450,000); therapeutic warm-water pool ($2,340,000); fitness centre ($2,460,000) and; an indoor walking track ($1,800,000). These features are in addition to the amenities already planned for the community centre: indoor pool (to replace Centennial Pool), multi-purpose rooms and space for intergenerational programming. Council referred the decision on the base funding and the optional program enhancements to the June 27 Special Meeting of Council.

While not recommended in the Master Plan, members of the Oakville Aquatics Club spoke at the meeting requesting a 50 meter pool for the community centre. Town Council asked they return to Council with financing associated with their request as well as fundraising potential.

Background

The former site of the Oakville-Trafalgar Memorial Hospital (OTMH) was part of the town’s overall 2013 South Central Public Lands Study (SCPLS) which reviewed a number of key sites owned by the town in south central Oakville (e.g. surplus school sites, Oakville Arena) and made recommendations about their future use, including recreation uses. The town is working with community partners to create a vibrant new community centre, park, and future residential areas site to meet the needs of Oakville residents.

This summer contractors will begin site preparation for the safe demolition of the former hospital and Helen Lawson buildings. The overall demolition and site remediation will take approximately 12 months to complete. Development of the new community centre will begin in late 2018 with an opening scheduled for fall 2020.

For more information and to sign up for email updates from the town, please visit our Former Hospital Site Project page.


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Complete the #MyOakville questionnaire for a chance to win!

Thursday, April 6, 2017 – for immediate release

Complete the #MyOakville questionnaire for a chance to win!

Community input part of strategy to increase access to Recreation and Culture services

The Town of Oakville is asking for the community’s help to ensure everyone has access to recreation and culture opportunities. Residents are invited to share their experiences and suggestions by completing the #MyOakville questionnaire for a chance to win one of three $100 Recreation and Culture program credits.

“As the demographics of Oakville shift, so will the need for more diverse and accessible recreational and cultural opportunities,” said Mayor Rob Burton. “We look to residents to provide input so we can continue to provide high-quality services and programs that meet their needs.”

The questionnaire asks residents how often they visit the town’s Recreation and Culture facilities, what type of activities, events and programs they are interested in, as well as what barriers limit their participation such as affordability, time constraints, availability of public transit, or general lack of awareness of what the town offers.

“Although there is a high demand for our programs and services, there is also a significant population that is not accessing the opportunities we provide,” said Nina de Vaal, director of Recreation and Culture. “Our goal is to better understand the barriers residents are facing so that we can develop a plan for the future that includes everyone.”

In addition to the questionnaire, the town’s community development specialists will interview people at various events and locations this spring. Residents are also invited to check out the #MyOakville videos, share ideas and vote on others on the Idea Forum, or connect with the town on social media using #MyOakville.

Visit our #MyOakville page for more information and to complete the questionnaire.


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Complete the #MyOakville questionnaire for a chance to win!

Oakville’s 2017 Citizen Survey shows overall satisfaction at 81 per cent

The results of the 2017 Citizen Survey are in! According to the results of the survey conducted by Pollara Strategic Insights, 81 per cent of residents are happy with their municipal government. The town conducts a survey every two years to track overall citizen satisfaction with town performance, identify emerging issues, and help set strategic priorities for the future.

“Feedback from our residents is our most valuable measure of success and we always welcome the opinions of our community,” Mayor Rob Burton said. “We’re encouraged by the positive results of this survey and will use this feedback to guide our efforts toward making Oakville an even more livable, thriving and vibrant town.”

During his presentation to Council, Craig Worden, executive vice-president of Public Affairs for Pollara Strategic Insights noted the town’s consistently high marks in overall satisfaction. “Oakville residents continue to express high satisfaction with their municipal government, the services it provides, and the town attributes that it manages.”

Residents were asked to rate specific town services as well as key attributes of the town. Overall satisfaction with key town attributes was 85 per cent, while overall satisfaction with town services was high at 89 per cent.

The highest levels of satisfaction with town attributes were feelings of belonging and safety (95 per cent), overall appearance of the community (88 per cent), and information provided to residents (84 per cent). The survey results also showed that 10 out of 12 services received satisfaction ratings over 80 per cent; with parks and green spaces (93 per cent), library services (88 per cent) and recreation fields and facilities (88 per cent) rounding out the top three. Satisfaction with winter road and sidewalk maintenance went up markedly this year to 81 per cent (from 74 per cent in the 2015).

To assist the town with prioritizing policies and plans, residents were asked to identify which priority they would like to see the town focus on the most. Residents indicated that the most important priorities are managing and controlling growth in Oakville (62 per cent) and the town’s natural environment (58 per cent). Ease of travelling and governing and managing the town both came in at third (45 per cent), followed by recreation and cultural programs (42 per cent) and economic growth (41 per cent).

When asked about the top issues facing the community today, residents identified urban sprawl and development, traffic and congestion and affordable housing as the top three. While affordable housing was significantly more important in 2017 than in previous years, the importance of taxes continued its steady decline.

Other survey highlights include that when it comes to interacting with the town, 85 per cent of residents expressed overall satisfaction with their customer service experience, remaining strong since 2015 and 2013 levels, up seven per cent from 2011. Eighty-seven per cent of residents also said that service was provided in a timely manner. Online communications also continues to grow in popularity among residents, with 73 per cent identifying oakville.ca as the preferred way of finding town information.

“Council will continue to focus on controlling growth, providing exceptional services and investing in high-quality infrastructure, all while giving residents the best value for their tax dollars,” said Mayor Burton. “The results of this survey show that residents and Council are on the same page in our efforts to make Oakville the most livable town in Canada.”

In January, Pollara Strategic Insights conducted a 20-minute phone survey, where a random sample of 805 residents were asked for their feedback and opinions about their community. In addition to the phone survey, 400 online surveys were completed, and 28 ideas were generated on the town’s Idea Forum on oakville.ca. This is the eighth citizen survey conducted by Oakville.

Current and past survey results are available on the Citizen Surveys page.


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Oakville Museum to use Coach House for cultural programs, exhibits and events

Tuesday, April 4, 2017 – for immediate release

Oakville Museum to use Coach House for cultural programs, exhibits and events

Council approves recommendations for multi-use redevelopment, federal funding application

The historic Oakville Museum Coach House will be redeveloped into a multi-use space for cultural programs, exhibits and events for the public to enjoy. Council approved the staff recommendation on Monday night.

“Creating vibrant cultural spaces is part of our vision to make Oakville’s downtown a social, economic and cultural hub,” said Mayor Rob Burton. “We’re very excited to transform this architectural gem into a welcoming cultural space that residents and community groups will be able to use for years to come.”

The Coach House is a 180-year-old heritage building that originally served as a horse stable and residence for the estate’s gardener. In the early 1990s the town opened Erchless Estate as a museum and retrofitted the Coach House to provide collection storage space. Now that the Museum uses storage facilities at Queen Elizabeth Park Community and Cultural Centre, the Coach House can take on a new role.

In 2016 the town engaged a consultant to review all existing reports related to the building, determine possible new uses and consult with the community to determine a preferred use.

The preferred redevelopment includes converting the main space of the building into a multi-purpose space for museum-led exhibits, programming and cultural events as well as community uses such as meetings and weddings. There will also be space for an artist-in-residence program, a small outdoor performance venue and space to accommodate food and beverage service for special events and performances.

The estimated cost to redevelop the building is $1.43-1.68 million, however staff will be applying for a grant from the Department of Canadian Heritage’s Canadian Cultural Spaces Fund (CCSF) which could cover up to 50 per cent of the cost.

Staff will begin planning the redevelopment of the Coach House immediately and renovation work is expected to begin in early 2018.


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Nominations now open for 2017 Oakville Community Spirit Awards

Wednesday, March 1, 2017 – for immediate release

Nominations now open for 2017 Oakville Community Spirit Awards

The Town of Oakville is once again honouring community champions who positively contribute to the life and spirit of the town. Nominations are now open for the 16th Annual Community Spirit Awards recognizing outstanding individuals, groups and businesses in seven categories.

Nominations will be accepted until Monday, April 10 at 4 p.m. in the following award categories:

Access Award, sponsored by Access Abilities
Arts Award, sponsored by The Oakville Beaver
Group Volunteer Award, sponsored by the Town of Oakville
Heritage Award, sponsored by Genworth Financial Canada
Individual Volunteer Award, sponsored by Paradiso Restaurant
Senior Award, sponsored by Chartwell Waterford Retirement Residence
Youth Award, sponsored by RBC Royal Bank

This year’s Community Spirit Awards presentation will be held on Wednesday, June 7, 2017, at Oakville’s Queen Elizabeth Park Community and Cultural Centre (QEPCCC). The 2017 Community Spirit Awards will be designed by local illustrator, designer and portrait artist Emily Soden. Emily works closely with oil, acrylic scratchboard and pencils, but her favourite mediums are watercolour and ink. Her commissions are inspired by nature and animals, often showcased as recurring themes in her work.

Nomination forms are available at all town recreation facilities, Town Hall and Oakville Public Library branches, or can be completed online. For more information visit the Community Spirit Awards page.


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Nominations now open for 2017 Oakville Community Spirit Awards

Town presents comprehensive demolition strategy for former hospital site

Wednesday, February 22, 2017 – for immediate release

Town presents comprehensive demolition strategy for former hospital site

Learn more at March 1 open house

Demolition of the former hospital site is scheduled to begin this summer and take approximately 12 months to complete. The town is committed to safely deconstructing the former hospital and Helen Lawson building, and has a thorough demolition strategy to guide the process. Residents are invited to attend an open house on March 1 from 6 – 8 p.m. at Town Hall to learn more.

“Much work has been underway at the former hospital site to prepare for this phase of the project,” Mayor Rob Burton said. “At our last open house residents asked questions about noise, dust, debris and traffic routing during the demolition. I encourage all residents to drop by our open house to learn more about our comprehensive strategy and the plans we have in place to address these concerns.”

At the open house residents can learn about the strategy’s overall performance guidelines, the types of demolition activities that will take place, how specific constraints for the site will be addressed, and the mitigations measures in place to minimize impacts due to dust, noise and traffic.

The overall demolition approach will be completed using standard mechanical demolition, the most widely used method of building demolition, which involves specialized mechanized equipment, articulated lifts and cranes. The demolition of the buildings will use a 3Rs approach – reduce, reuse and recycle – with the contractor diverting as much waste as possible from landfill.

The Former Hospital Site Project is about the town working with our community partners to create a vibrant new community centre, park and future residential area to meet the needs of Oakville residents. This stage of the overall project involves demolishing the buildings, conducting a community needs assessment, determining the appropriate location for the centre and park, and developing a plan for future residential on any remaining lands. Following the demolition, the development of the community centre will take three years to complete with an opening scheduled for the end of 2020.

In addition, the Local Health Integration Network (LHIN) is undertaking a third party study on the future health needs of the area surrounding the former hospital site. The study is the first step in response to resident request for consideration of local healthcare services provided in the area. Once the results of the study are known, the town and the LHIN will further investigate opportunities for joint programming at the former hospital site including opportunities related to a health hub.

The former site of the Oakville-Trafalgar Memorial Hospital (OTMH) was part of the town’s overall South Central Public Lands Study (SCPLS) which reviewed a number of key sites owned by the town in south central Oakville (e.g. surplus school sites, Oakville Arena) and made recommendations about their future use, including recreation uses.

For more information and to sign up for email updates from the town, please visit the Town of Oakville website at oakville.ca and use the search words “former hospital”. You can also email any questions to formerhospitalsite@oakville.ca. If you plan to attend the open house on March 1 and have any accessibility needs, please let us know by February 23 by contacting ServiceOakville at 905-845-6601, or by filling out the online accessible feedback form.


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Town presents comprehensive demolition strategy for former hospital site