Former Hospital Site Project takes big step forward

Council endorses site master plan as well as base funding and amenities for community centre

The redevelopment project of the former Oakville-Trafalgar Memorial Hospital lands took a significant step forward at a Special Meeting last night when Town Council endorsed an overall master plan for the lands as well as the some programming and features for the Southeast Oakville Community Centre that is planned for the site.

“It is important for Council that our plan for the hospital lands reflect the needs and wishes of local residents,” said Mayor Burton. “We appreciate the thoughtful insight provided by community members throughout this consultation process, which has helped staff draft a plan that Council can fully support.”

Recently, residents from across Oakville were invited to share their thoughts on three proposed land use concepts for the overall site at a community workshop and through an online discussion forum. All three land use concepts include a community centre, a park and residential development but the arrangement was slightly different in each option.

While the feedback received was extensive both in person and online, there was no clear consensus on one particular option. However, certain themes and a common concept of establishing distinct districts did emerge with a residential district in the north, a civic district with a community centre and park in the middle, and a seniors-oriented housing district in the south.

With that in mind, the Council-endorsed former Oakville-Trafalgar Hospital Site Master Plan includes:

A residential area that complements the existing neighbourhood and maintains the character of the community as intended in the official plan.
A civic area that consolidates the community centre and parkland along Reynolds Street since it is the busiest street bounding the site, and allows the park space to be open, follow the principles of safe-park design and be highly accessible. The town also wants to explore the creation of a visible civic square in the area around the former high school. With Council’s approval of the master plan, exploration for re-use of the building will be required.
A seniors-oriented housing area that gives options for residents to down-size to smaller, more manageable properties or dwelling units without the need to leave the community. The area could range from independent seniors-living to assisted-care. Further discussions with members of the community and stakeholders will be needed to help define these opportunities.

The final master plan was also fully endorsed at last night’s meeting by the resident associations in Ward 3.

“What residents made clear during the consultation process is that the former hospital and high school played a critical role in anchoring and contributing to the neighbouring community’s identity,” added Mayor Rob Burton. “As such, the final master plan reflects the idea of maintaining that legacy for years to come.”

At last night’s meeting, Council also approved the following enhancements for the new Southeast Community Centre on the site expansion of the single gym to a double gym ($470,000); therapeutic warm-water pool ($2,740,000); fitness centre ($2,550,000) and; an indoor walking track ($1,800,000). These features are in addition to the amenities already planned for the community centre: indoor pool (to replace Centennial Pool), multi-purpose rooms and space for intergenerational programming.

A financial overview on the project was also received by Council which estimates the cost for entire project, including demolition, parking garage enhancements and community centre development, to be approximately $54 million. Town reserves are a primary funding source for this project. The sale of lands not used for a community centre or park is intended to replenish funding used from the reserve. This strategy is one way to ensure sufficient funding for other large, long term projects across the town in the future.

Moving ahead, the demolition contractors will begin site preparation this summer. The overall demolition and site remediation will take approximately 12 months to complete. The architectural/general contractor team responsible for the community centre will be selected in early July. The process of design will begin shortly afterwards. The development of the new community centre will begin in late 2018 with an opening scheduled for fall 2020.

A number of Planning Act approvals will also be necessary in order for the redevelopment of the site to proceed including official plan and zoning amendments, and draft plan of subdivision/site plan approvals. Amendments to the town’s Official Plan and Zoning By-law will be subject to the statutory planning process and a public meeting is expected in the fall with proposed Official Plan updates by the end of 2017.

The town plans on engaging with the public later this fall on the project including progress on the demolition work and next steps regarding the design of the community centre design and potential uses of the park.

Check out the June 27 Special Council Agenda for detail, including staff reports. For more information and to sign up for the town’s newsletter.


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Former Hospital Site Project takes big step forward

Town presents comprehensive demolition strategy for former hospital site

Wednesday, February 22, 2017 – for immediate release

Town presents comprehensive demolition strategy for former hospital site

Learn more at March 1 open house

Demolition of the former hospital site is scheduled to begin this summer and take approximately 12 months to complete. The town is committed to safely deconstructing the former hospital and Helen Lawson building, and has a thorough demolition strategy to guide the process. Residents are invited to attend an open house on March 1 from 6 – 8 p.m. at Town Hall to learn more.

“Much work has been underway at the former hospital site to prepare for this phase of the project,” Mayor Rob Burton said. “At our last open house residents asked questions about noise, dust, debris and traffic routing during the demolition. I encourage all residents to drop by our open house to learn more about our comprehensive strategy and the plans we have in place to address these concerns.”

At the open house residents can learn about the strategy’s overall performance guidelines, the types of demolition activities that will take place, how specific constraints for the site will be addressed, and the mitigations measures in place to minimize impacts due to dust, noise and traffic.

The overall demolition approach will be completed using standard mechanical demolition, the most widely used method of building demolition, which involves specialized mechanized equipment, articulated lifts and cranes. The demolition of the buildings will use a 3Rs approach – reduce, reuse and recycle – with the contractor diverting as much waste as possible from landfill.

The Former Hospital Site Project is about the town working with our community partners to create a vibrant new community centre, park and future residential area to meet the needs of Oakville residents. This stage of the overall project involves demolishing the buildings, conducting a community needs assessment, determining the appropriate location for the centre and park, and developing a plan for future residential on any remaining lands. Following the demolition, the development of the community centre will take three years to complete with an opening scheduled for the end of 2020.

In addition, the Local Health Integration Network (LHIN) is undertaking a third party study on the future health needs of the area surrounding the former hospital site. The study is the first step in response to resident request for consideration of local healthcare services provided in the area. Once the results of the study are known, the town and the LHIN will further investigate opportunities for joint programming at the former hospital site including opportunities related to a health hub.

The former site of the Oakville-Trafalgar Memorial Hospital (OTMH) was part of the town’s overall South Central Public Lands Study (SCPLS) which reviewed a number of key sites owned by the town in south central Oakville (e.g. surplus school sites, Oakville Arena) and made recommendations about their future use, including recreation uses.

For more information and to sign up for email updates from the town, please visit the Town of Oakville website at oakville.ca and use the search words “former hospital”. You can also email any questions to formerhospitalsite@oakville.ca. If you plan to attend the open house on March 1 and have any accessibility needs, please let us know by February 23 by contacting ServiceOakville at 905-845-6601, or by filling out the online accessible feedback form.


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Town presents comprehensive demolition strategy for former hospital site

The Tale of a Town exhibit on display in Oakville

Wednesday, February 8, 2017 – for immediate release

The Tale of a Town exhibit on display in Oakville

An interactive exhibit showcasing the personal stories and memories of Oakville community members will be on display at the Queen Elizabeth Community Cultural Centre (QEPCCC) from February 11 to 20, 2017.

Hosted by the Town of Oakville, in partnership with FIXT POINT Arts and Media, The Tale of a Town exhibit is part of a national storytelling project that gathers the rich histories of main streets and downtown cores through personal interviews with the people who live there.

In June 2016 the project’s Storymobile (a recording booth on wheels) gathered over 100 stories from local Oakville heroes, community stakeholders, neighbourhood residents and independent business owners. The exhibit features active listening stations, a quote wall, an activity station and a recording booth to continue to capture new stories.

In September the exhibit will be brought to life, alongside stories from across Canada, in a stage performance piece at the Oakville Centre for the Performing Arts.

The exhibit is on display in the Main Gallery of QEPCCC located at 2302 Bridge Road. Admission is free.

For more information, visit oakville.ca and search “Tale of a Town.”


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The Tale of a Town exhibit on display in Oakville

Downtown Plan moving forward

Tuesday, February 14, 2017 – for immediate release

Downtown Plan moving forward

Council-approved Lakeshore Road streetscape furniture will showcase downtown’s historic character

The revitalization of Lakeshore Road took a big step forward last night when Council approved the bridge railing, the lighting and the furniture selections (streetlight poles, benches, bollards, bike rings) for downtown Oakville.

“Thanks to public input we have streetscape furniture and materials that truly reflects what our residents want to see in Oakville’s historic downtown,” said Oakville Mayor Rob Burton. “We look forward to creating a vibrant Lakeshore Road that showcases the best of Oakville’s livability, history and distinct character.”

Community input has been vital throughout the Lakeshore Road East Reconstruction and Streetscape Project. After extensive public consultation both in-person and on-line, a traditional style of streetscape furniture was approved by Council on October 3, 2016, and specific furniture pieces were selected by residents’ and businesses in December.

With Council’s approval last night, staff will begin incorporating the selections into the Lakeshore Road Reconstruction and Streetscape Project, slated to start in 2019, and into the overall Downtown Transportation and Streetscape (DTS) Master Plan for other roads in downtown as they are reconstructed. The new curbs and pavers will be included in the new construction of Lakeshore Road Bridge at Sixteen Mile Creek which is expected to be completed in December 2017. Staff have also reported to the Heritage Oakville Advisory Committee and requested a heritage permit for the furnishings.

It should be noted that the town’s standard for LED fixture colour temperature is 4000K. With town’s public outreach resulting in a clear preference for 3000K for the streetlights within the historic downtown commercial district, Council approved staff’s recommendation to retrofit 3000K LED fixtures on existing decorative poles in the town’s other commercial districts – Kerr Village and Bronte Village. In addition, while there was clear preference for the existing streetlight pole and acorn fixture styles, staff will be reporting back to Council during the final engineering design phase on the costs of refurbishing the existing poles and retrofitting the LED fixtures, or installing new poles to match the existing styles.

Moving forward, staff will continue to work on developing options for a flexible/curbless look for Lakeshore Road and will launch a separate public engagement process this spring with a report due back to Council later in the year.

Background

The Downtown Plan, launched in December 2013, is comprised of the Downtown Cultural Hub Study (DCH), and the Downtown Transportation and Streetscape Study (DTS).

The DTS was approved by Council in April 2015. This study assessed the current traffic and roadway conditions in downtown Oakville and created recommendations to enhance the roadways, beautify streets, improve pedestrian/cycle ways and revitalize the Towne Square, by introducing design standards as well as increasing connectivity, mobility and accessibility. In November 2015 Council approved the timing for the Lakeshore Road Reconstruction and Streetscape Project to commence in 2019 and be completed over a two year period. In addition, the Lakeshore Road Bridge over Sixteen Mile Creek is now closed for reconstruction and will reopen in December 2017.


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Downtown Plan moving forward

Town prepares for reconstruction of Lakeshore Road Bridge at Sixteen Mile Creek

Wednesday, January 18, 2017 – for immediate release

Town prepares for reconstruction of Lakeshore Road Bridge at Sixteen Mile Creek

Bridge closes the week of January 30; reopens December 2017

During the week of January 30, 2017, the Lakeshore Road Bridge over Sixteen Mile Creek will be closed until December 2017 to motorists, cyclists and pedestrians in both directions. The bridge is being reconstructed as part of the overall Lakeshore Road Reconstruction and Streetscape project.

A detour route around the bridge will be provided via Kerr Street, Rebecca Street and Navy Street. All businesses, the library, the theatre and Centennial Pool remain open and accessible during construction.

“The town is moving forward with a much needed project to reconstruct Lakeshore Road East starting with the bridge. Changing the streetscape in downtown Oakville will help pave the way for a revitalized downtown,” said Mayor Rob Burton. “We appreciate everyone’s patience during construction and remind you that it is business as usual in downtown Oakville.”

Once complete, the new bridge will include two travel lanes and bikes lanes. There will also be a wider pedestrian sidewalk with a barrier wall to separate the sidewalk and vehicular traffic. New pedestrian railings and lookouts will be included as well as LED lighting. The Lakeshore Road approaches to the bridge between Navy Street and Forsythe Street will also be reconstructed.

On January 5, 2017, in preparation for the bridge closure, Navy Street was permanently converted to two-way traffic between Lakeshore and Rebecca/Randall streets. Signs are posted around the area to notify drivers of the change. As part of the Council approved Downtown Transportation and Streetscape Study (DTS), Navy Street is one of several streets in downtown Oakville scheduled to be converted to two-way operation. The other streets are still in the detailed design phase and are scheduled to be converted in 2018.

Another addition to Downtown Oakville is the new pedestrian crossover device at the intersection of Navy Street and Church Street (in front of Centennial Square). Several new crossovers are planned to be installed across town in 2017 starting with the Navy and Church street location. Pedestrian crossovers have specific pavement markings and crossing signs. There are three types of crossovers. The crossover at Navy and Church has poles, flashing beacons above the signs and pedestrian push buttons. Unlike pedestrian crosswalks at traffic signal locations, at a crossover, drivers and cyclists must stop behind the yield line and wait until the pedestrian completely crosses the road before proceeding.

With Lakeshore Road East (Navy Street to Allan Street) coming to the end of its lifespan and needing a major reconstruction, the town undertook extensive research and public consultation to identify broader opportunities to improve traffic, beautify streets and improve pedestrian/cycle ways in the downtown. In October 2015, Council approved the Lakeshore Road Reconstruction and Streetscape Project as part of the Downtown Transportation and Streetscape Study (DTS) study. The Lakeshore Bridge at Sixteen Mile Creek reconstruction is taking place in advance of the road project as inspections of the bridge revealed its condition warrants immediate attention.

For details about this project, please visit the Lakeshore Road Bridge Reconstruction page. Additional information will be posted online as the projects progress. You can also contact ServiceOakville at 905-845-6601.


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Town prepares for reconstruction of Lakeshore Road Bridge at Sixteen Mile Creek

Help shape the future of transportation options within town

Wednesday, November 23, 2016 – for immediate release

Help shape the future of transportation options within town

Take the surveys online or attend one of the public events

The town is developing a Transportation Demand Management (TDM) plan and a Pedestrian Safety program and wants to hear how you get around town, what your travel preferences are, and what would motivate you to try different travel options such as walking, cycling, public transit and carpooling. Residents are invited to share their ideas by completing the TDM and Pedestrian Safety surveys online or by participating in one of the public events happening this month.

“Providing our community with safe, efficient and accessible options for getting around town is one more way we’re making Oakville even more livable,” said Oakville Mayor Rob Burton. “That’s why we’re exploring ways to better meet the transportation needs of Oakville residents.”

The goal of the TDM plan is to provide alternatives to single occupancy vehicle trips and help alleviate traffic congestion in Oakville. The plan will explore ways to help residents make better use of current infrastructure and travel options, improve air quality and reduce greenhouse gas emissions, while making commuting less expensive and more enjoyable.

The Pedestrian Safety program will work to promote more active modes of transportation, make Oakville even more pedestrian friendly, and identify areas that would benefit from designated pedestrian crossings.

Both the TDM plan and Pedestrian Safety program build on the success of the town’s existing Transportation Master Plan, Switching Gears.

Provide your input

There are a number of ways you can provide your input:

Visit the Public Engagement Hub before December 9 to complete the online surveys

Visit and talk to the project team at:

Iroquois Ridge Community Centre on Thursday, November 24 from 5-8 p.m.
Glen Abbey Community Centre on Wednesday, November 30 from 5-8 p.m.

Visit the Roads, Sidewalks and Traffic page to learn more.


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Help shape the future of transportation options within town

Keeping it traditional for downtown Oakville

Furniture style chosen. Selection of specific furniture pieces happening later this fall

Following extensive public consultation, Council approved a traditional furniture style for downtown Oakville at the October 3, 2016, meeting, taking the town one step further towards revitalizing Lakeshore Road. Choosing the individual furniture pieces will be part of the next round of public consultation happening later this fall.

“Council appreciates the way the community had a strong preference for a traditional style of street furniture that could support and reinforce our town’s regard for preserving and complementing our heritage,” Mayor Rob Burton said.

In September 2016, the town invited residents to select, in-person or online, a preferred style — traditional, contemporary or classic — for the streetscape furnishings (streetlights, benches, bike rings and bollards) for downtown Oakville as part of the Lakeshore Road East Reconstruction and Streetscape Project. Each style was designed to complement the downtown heritage district.

In an effort to connect with residents from across town, staff were at seven high-traffic events/locations including the Downtown Oakville Farmers’ Market, Sixteen Mile Sports Complex and other town community centres. Photos of each furniture style — traditional, contemporary and classic — were on display for review and then residents chose the style they liked best. An online photo library and voting option was also available from September 8 to 23, 2016.

In total, 1,431 persons participated and 867 (60.5%) preferred traditional; 264 (18.5%) contemporary; and 300 (21%) classic furniture. The Downtown BIA also did its own internal survey of its members which resulted in a preference for the traditional style.

With a furniture style now chosen, the next step is to select the individual furniture pieces that work best for downtown Oakville. That decision will be part of the next round of public consultation happening later this fall with a preferred suite of traditional furniture pieces going to Council for approval in early 2017. Staff will also be reporting to Heritage Committee on the traditional furnishing options.

Once finalized, the new streetscape materials and furnishings will be used as part of the Lakeshore Road Reconstruction and Streetscape Project slated to start in 2019, and for other streets in downtown Oakville as they are reconstructed in the future. The new curbs and pavers, approved by Council in July, will be included when the town undertakes to rehabilitate the Lakeshore Road Bridge at Sixteen Mile Creek starting in early 2017, including the roadway approaches between Navy Street and Forsythe Street.

Background

Following extensive public consultation through the Downtown Transportation and Streetscape Study (DTS) a contemporary furniture theme was chosen in 2015, over traditional and classical, to complement the historic buildings in the streetscape yet remain a reflection of the current time. However, when specific contemporary furniture pieces were presented to the public this past March and June there was significant concern and opposition about the theme choice. Desire to maximize a flexible (curbless) design of the Lakeshore Road East configuration was also discussed at these meetings as a topic for consideration.

In July 2016, Town Council passed a motion directing staff to recommence a public engagement process with traditional, classical and contemporary furniture options — streetlights, benches, bike rings and bollards — for the Lakeshore Road East Reconstruction and Streetscape Project. In the meantime, staff are moving forward with incorporating the garbage/recycling stations as well as the granite pavers and curbs into the streetscape design as presented to the public this past March and June.

The motion also called on staff to develop options for Lakeshore Road that would provide, in whole or in part, a flexible (curbless) street. Staff are expected to report back on both items in early 2017.

For more information visit the Lakeshore Road Reconstruction Project page.


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Keeping it traditional for downtown Oakville

Council approves budget and redevelopment plans for Oakville Arena and Trafalgar Park

Site will include outdoor rink, fitness centre and Fire Education and Heritage Room

Plans to redevelop Oakville Arena and Trafalgar Park now include an outdoor rink, an accessible playground with shade structure, a fitness centre and a room in the new fire hall dedicated to fire safety education and heritage. Council approved $2,849,000 in additional funding at the September 19, 2016, Council meeting, bringing the total project budget to $41,044,000.

“Providing the facilities to help residents lead more healthy, engaged and active lives is a key part of our livable Oakville vision,” said Mayor Rob Burton. “I’m proud to say the new Oakville Arena and Trafalgar Park will do all that and more. With the help of public input from Oakville residents we have developed plans for a truly dynamic community space.”

The project will expand the existing Oakville Arena to a 65,500 square foot community centre while retaining the arena’s wooden roof trusses recognized as a heritage feature. The community centre will include an NHL-size ice pad, a seniors’ centre, public meeting space, fitness centre, full-size gymnasium, and an indoor running track. Trafalgar Park will feature a fully accessible playground with a shade structure, a double tennis court that will be converted into an artificial outdoor rink in the winter, and exterior washroom facilities.

The Fire Education and Heritage Room included in the new fire hall on the corner of Kerr and Rebecca Street will offer interactive displays, public education materials, historical artifacts along with a 1948 vintage pumper truck on display.

Of the additional $2,849,000 approved by Council, $994,000 will address a number of factors identified during the first phase of the project, known as validation. Since the original project budget of $38,195,000 was established in 2014, the town’s standards in energy management, storm water management and accessibility have changed. Those changes, along with current market conditions, the low Canadian dollar and expenses related to site remediation contributed to the budget increase.

“The validation phase of this project has been critical because it’s given us a deeper understanding of potential issues and how to address them in the most cost-effective way possible,” said Nicole Wolfe, manager of capital projects in the Facilities and Construction Management department. “Our team reviewed numerous options to identify efficiencies in order to drive down costs, and provide better value to the town.”

The fire hall is expected to open in November of 2017 and the arena and community centre are scheduled to open in the fall of 2018 to coincide with the start of the ice season.

Additional budget details are outlined in the staff report to Council. For more information about the project, visit the Oakville Arena redevelopment page.


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Council approves budget and redevelopment plans for Oakville Arena and Trafalgar Park

Do you like traditional, contemporary or classic furnishings for downtown Oakville?

Tuesday, September 13, 2016 – for immediate release

Do you like traditional, contemporary or classic furnishings for downtown Oakville?

Have your say at various events around town or vote online

The town is inviting residents to vote for a traditional, contemporary or classic style of furnishings— streetlights, benches, bike rings and bollards — for downtown as part of the Lakeshore Road East Reconstruction and Streetscape Project.

Voting started this past Saturday at the Downtown Oakville Farmers’ Market and continues for the next two weeks on the Lakeshore Road Reconstruction and Streetscape Project page or in person at:

Sixteen Mile Sports Complex — Wednesday, September 14, 2016, 6 to 8 p.m.
Iroquois Ridge Community Centre — Thursday, September 15, 2016, 6 to 8 p.m.
Downtown Oakville Farmers’ Market on George Street — Saturday, September 17, 2016, 9 a.m. to noon
Town Hall, Oakville/Trafalgar Room — Tuesday, September 20, 2016, 6 to 8 p.m.
Queen Elizabeth Park Community and Cultural Centre — Wednesday, September 21, 2016, 6 to 8 p.m.
Glen Abbey Community Centre — Thursday, September 22, 2016, 6 to 8 p.m.

Each of the three styles (traditional, contemporary or classic) is designed to complement the downtown heritage district. The photos on display at the events and posted online give a sense of each style, but do not necessarily represent the final furniture pieces that will be selected. Once a style is determined, the next step will be to choose the individual furniture pieces that work best for downtown Oakville. This will be part of the next round of public consultation happening later this year.

“Streetscape furniture and benches serve to reflect the character of a community,” said Oakville Mayor Rob Burton. “This is your chance to tell us how we should best showcase the character of our historic downtown. We want public input to help us move forward with a vibrant Lakeshore Road that shows the best of Oakville’s history and livability.”

Following extensive public consultation through the Downtown Transportation and Streetscape Study (DTS) a contemporary style was chosen in 2015, over traditional and classic, to complement the historic buildings in the streetscape yet remain a reflection of the current time. However, when specific contemporary furniture pieces were presented to the public this past March and June there was significant concern and opposition about the style choice. Desire to maximize a flexible (curbless) design of the Lakeshore Road East configuration was also discussed at these meetings as a topic for consideration.

On July 25, 2016, Town Council passed a motion directing staff to recommence a public engagement process to gather more feedback. The motion also called on staff to develop options for a flexible (curbless) street. Staff is expected to report back on both items in early 2017. In the meantime, staff will move forward with incorporating the garbage/recycling stations as well as the granite pavers and curbs into the streetscape design as presented to the public this past March and June.

Background

The Downtown Oakville Heritage Conservation District (DOHCD) Plan identified the current mixture of designs, materials and colours in downtown as visually cluttered. The DOHCD Plan identified the opportunity for a new design of street furnishings, allowing for contemporary improvements, so long as it is cohesive, supports the pedestrian environment and does not compete with the historic material of the district.

With Lakeshore Road East (Navy Street to Allan Street) coming to the end of its lifespan and needing a major reconstruction, the town undertook extensive research and public consultation to identify broader opportunities to improve traffic, beautify streets and improve pedestrian/cycle ways in the downtown. In October 2015, Council approved the Lakeshore Road Reconstruction and Streetscape Project as part of the Downtown Transportation and Streetscape Study (DTS) study.

For more information visit th Lakeshore Reconstruction Project page.


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Do you like traditional, contemporary or classic furnishings for downtown Oakville?

Share your memories of Oakville as part of the Tale of the Town theatre and media project

Monday, May 30, 2016 – for immediate release

Share your memories of Oakville as part of the Tale of the Town theatre and media project

Visit the Storymobile at various locations from June 9 to 26, 2016

Have you watched downtown Oakville change over the years? If you have a compelling community story or memory to share you won’t want to miss the Tale of a Town project coming to Oakville next month.

The Tale of a Town is a site-specific theatre and media project that captures the collective memories of Canada’s main streets, one story at a time. The initiative begins by gathering the histories of main streets and downtown cores through personal interviews with the people who live there.

“Oakville is a town with a rich history and I encourage everyone with a great story to participate in this unique opportunity to bring these stories to life once again” said Mayor Rob Burton.

The Tale of a Town project is currently touring Ontario and the project’s Storymobile will be visiting various locations in Oakville from June 9 to 26, 2016. Stories gathered during these interviews will inspire the creation of a performance installation where submissions will be showcased through a theatrical, interactive platform at the Oakville Centre for the Performing Arts later this year. Stories collected in Ontario will feed into the Tale of a Town-Canada project to become a multi-platform celebration of the country’s main street culture in tribute to Canada’s 150th anniversary in 2017.

Oakville residents are invited to visit the Tale of a Town-Oakville Storymobile when it stops at the following locations:

Towne Square:

June 9 (12-5 p.m.), June 10 (4– 9 p.m.), June 11 (8 a.m.–2 p.m.) June 17 (4–9 p.m.), June 18 (8 a.m.–2 p.m.) June 19 (noon–5 p.m.), June 21 (4– 9 p.m.), and June 25 (9 a.m.–2 p.m.)

Lakeside Park:

June 12 (noon–4 p.m.)

Coronation Park:

June 20 (10 a.m.–2 p.m.)

Oakville Soccer Club:

June 24 (5–8 p.m.)

Oakville RibFest at Sheridan College:

June 26 (noon–4 p.m.)

Visit the Tale of the Town-Oakville project page for more information. To book an interview session, email events@oakville.ca


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Share your memories of Oakville as part of the Tale of the Town theatre and media project