#BurlON ’til June 20

#BurlON Til June 20 It’s festival season here in Burlington and our Tourism Burlington team…

The post #BurlON ’til June 20 appeared first on Tourism Burlington.

Originally from – 

#BurlON ’til June 20

Oakville introduces new parking app with HonkMobile

Thursday, July 6, 2017 – for immediate release

Oakville introduces new parking app with HonkMobile

Skip the line! Park and pay with your phone

The Town of Oakville has partnered with HonkMobile to offer a new way to pay for parking at municipal parking lots in Downtown Oakville and Kerr Village. In addition to the existing Pay by Plate machines, visitors can now pay for parking from their smartphone using the Honk app.

“We’re always looking for new ways to use technology to enhance town services,” said Mayor Rob Burton. “With the Honk app, there is no waiting at the pay stations. It’s easy as park, search, pay and go, making it easier to shop, visit and enjoy all that Downtown and Kerr Village has to offer.”

Honk also notifies users when their time is about to expire and allows them to buy additional time right from their smartphone, eliminating the need to rush back to a parking machine and helping to avoid tickets.

Simply download the free app from honkmobile.com, the App Store or Google Play and set up your account. When you’re ready to park, choose your zone and enter the parking time needed. Information is also posted on each parking lot’s pay-by-plate machines, if you need help.

“Honk is revolutionizing parking across North America and we are thrilled to bring our service to Oakville,” says Honk Founder and CEO Michael Back. “It’s really a win-win for the town and its’ motorists. As mobile adoption increases, there is less need for parking equipment and meters and their associated maintenance costs. The ease and convenience of the app eliminates the need to get out of the car to pay for parking.”

Look for the signs at all municipal parking lots that use Honk! On-street mobile payment will be accepted in the coming weeks.

For more information, please visit our Municipal Parking Lots and Garages page.

About HonkMobile:

HonkMobile is North America’s leading provider of on-demand mobile payments for parking. Honk’s innovative cloud-based technology streamlines parking by allowing users to search, pay for, and top up parking from their mobile phone, tablet or any internet connected device. Honk is already accepted at over 800 locations and 150,000 parking spaces across Canada and the United States. Using a single account, motorists can pay for parking anywhere Honk is accepted across North America.


Sign up for the town’s RSS feeds

to get information delivered right to your desktop.

Excerpt from:

Oakville introduces new parking app with HonkMobile

Council recognizes four significant cultural heritage landscapes in Oakville

Wednesday, May 17, 2017 – for immediate release

Council recognizes four significant cultural heritage landscapes in Oakville

$150,000 additional funding approved to undertake Phase Three: Implementation of Protection Measures

Council recognized four Oakville properties as significant cultural heritage landscapes at its Planning and Development Council meeting Monday night. The four properties are:

Raydor Estate/Glen Abbey at 1333 Dorval Drive
Bowbeer Farmstead at 1086 Burnamthorpe Road East
Hilton Farm at 2013 North Service Road West
Biggar Farm at 4243 Sixth Line

The four properties will now be subject to Phase Three implementation work led by town staff to identify and recommend to Council potential measures to safeguard the heritage attributes of these properties.

Council’s decision took into account advice from town heritage staff, detailed information, analysis and opinions provided by external experts led by Letourneau Heritage Consulting, as well as input from landowners, the Heritage Oakville Advisory Committee and the public.

“The expert assessments and the staff report were very convincing in identifying how the four properties met the criteria to be recognized as significant cultural heritage landscapes,” Mayor Burton said. “We look forward to hearing back from staff, the public and the landowners on how we can best protect the heritage importance of these properties moving forward.”

Council’s decision continues the implementation of the town’s Cultural Heritage Landscapes Strategy, endorsed by Council in January 2014. These four properties were identified as high priority sites for further study in the Phase One Cultural Heritage Landscape Inventory endorsed by Council in February 2016. Last night’s actions concluded Phase Two Cultural Heritage Landscape Assessments for these properties. Council approved $150,000 in additional funding for Phase Three, which will include assistance from independent experts. 1333 Dorval Drive (Glen Abbey Golf Course/RayDor Estate) remains a high priority for completion.

Council also approved a staff recommendation that no further action be taken as part of the Cultural Heritage Landscape Strategy on two other properties that had been identified as high priority sites in the Phase One Inventory, Rivaz Farm at 3367 Dundas Street West and the Van Sickle Farm at 3451 Tremaine Road. These properties, while not identified as significant cultural heritage landscapes, were identified to have significant built heritage resources that may warrant protection. Two other high priority properties which are owned by the town, Bronte Harbour (3014 Lakeshore Road West) and Bronte Bluffs (35 West River Street) will be subject to Phase Two assessments in the coming months.

A cultural heritage landscape is a geographical area of heritage significance that has been modified by human activities and is valued by a community for the important contribution they make to our understanding of the history of a place, an event, or a people. The Provincial Policy Statement requires that significant cultural heritage landscapes be conserved.

For more information visit our Cultural Heritage Landscapes strategy page.


Sign up for the town’s RSS feeds

to get information delivered right to your desktop.

Visit source: 

Council recognizes four significant cultural heritage landscapes in Oakville

Draft Cultural Heritage Landscapes assessments completed on six high-priority properties

Thursday, April 13, 2017 – for immediate release

Draft Cultural Heritage Landscapes assessments completed on six high-priority properties

Report will go to Heritage Oakville Advisory Committee on Tuesday, April 25, 2017

The Town of Oakville today released the draft Phase Two Cultural Heritage Landscape Assessments undertaken on six high-priority properties identified for further study by the Phase One Cultural Heritage Landscape Inventory endorsed by Council on February 2016. The research for this phase of the project was undertaken by Letourneau Heritage Consulting.

A cultural heritage landscape is a geographical area of heritage significance that has been modified by human activities and is valued by a community for the important contribution they make to our understanding of the history of a place, an event, or a people. The six properties considered in this phase of the project were:

Bowbeer Farmstead (1086 Burnhamthorpe Road East)
Raydor Estate / Glen Abbey (1333 Dorval Drive)
McMichael Farm (3367 Dundas Street West)
Hilton Farm (2031 North Service Road West)
Biggar Farm (4243 Sixth Line)
Remnant Farmstead (3451 Tremaine Road)

The report on the draft Phase Two Cultural Heritage Landscapes Assessments will be considered by Heritage Oakville Advisory Committee on April 25, 2017. The meeting will take place at Town Hall, Council Chamber, beginning at 9:30 a.m. The recommendations from Heritage Oakville and staff will go forward to Council for consideration at its meeting of May 15, 2017.

“The town’s Heritage Oakville Advisory Committee has a critical role to play in reviewing the evidence provided by the heritage consultant in this phase of the process,” Mayor Burton said. “Council looks forward to receiving the committee’s advice and feedback.”

The Provincial Policy Statement requires that significant cultural heritage landscapes be conserved. Phase Two assessments provide an evidentiary basis, if any, on which Council could proceed with any protection measures in Phase Three, such as Official Plan policies or designation under the Ontario Heritage Act.

To register to speak at the Heritage Oakville Advisory Committee meeting of April 25, 2017, please call 905-815-6015 or email townclerk@oakville.ca by 4:30 p.m. the day prior to the meeting.

To register to speak at the Planning and Development Council meeting of May 15, 2017, please call 905-815-6015 or email townclerk@oakville.ca by noon the day of the meeting.

For more information visit our Cultural Heritage Landscapes strategy page.


Sign up for the town’s RSS feeds

to get information delivered right to your desktop.

Read more: 

Draft Cultural Heritage Landscapes assessments completed on six high-priority properties

Town continues ash tree removals from EAB-infested woodlands

Residents are invited to learn more at community open house on January 11, 2017

This winter, as weather and ground conditions permit, the town’s contractor will begin year three of the Woodlands Hazard Abatement program to remove ash trees destroyed by the Emerald Ash Borer (EAB) from town woodlands. The town is removing dead and dying trees near public trails and bordering properties for safety and to allow new trees to grow. Trails may be temporarily closed as the work is carried out.

Residents are invited to an open house at Town Hall on January 11, 2017, from 6 to 8 p.m. to learn more.

While natural regeneration will account for most of the regrowth in the woodlands, the town is establishing a number of planting sites in select areas to help the urban forest regrow.

“A thriving tree canopy brings tremendous environmental, health and economic benefits to a community, which is why Council has made growing Oakville’s urban forest a key part of our livable Oakville vision,” said Mayor Rob Burton. “Even in the face of disease, ice storms and EAB, our efforts to grow Oakville’s tree canopy have been paying off. We will continue to build on that success in 2017 and for many years to come.”

Following tree removals, logs, branches and wood debris are left on the forest floor to eventually break down, nourish the soil, and aid in the regrowth of shrubs and trees.

“The town is following a comprehensive management program to help our woodlands regrow after the impact of EAB, including natural regeneration and intensive planting sites. Over 14 hectares (34.6 acres) of woodland properties have been replanted to date,” said Chris Mark, director, Parks and Open Space. “We encourage residents to come to the open house and talk with our forestry experts to learn how EAB has affected our woodlands and how they will regrow.”

Removal of woodland ash trees is a multi-year program. Woodlands with more than 50 per cent ash population are a priority. Once these woodlands are completed, the town will begin removals in the woodlands with less than 50 per cent ash population.

The town will also remove some invasive species and trees other than ash that are identified as structurally unsound or are over-crowding the forest. By following this sustainable forest management approach, the Town of Oakville is the first lower-tier municipality in Canada to have all of its woodlands achieve Forest Stewardship Council® (FSC®) certification through the forest certification program of the Eastern Ontario Model Forest. The FSC® is an international, membership-based, non-profit organization that supports environmentally appropriate, socially beneficial, and economically viable management of the world’s forests.

The town continues to manage EAB in our active parks and on the road allowance, and has successfully treated over 3,800 ash trees, which are still healthy, with the bio insecticide TreeAzin to save them from the destructive insect.

To get information about the town’s EAB management program, visit the trees and woodlands page.

EAB facts:

EAB is a highly destructive insect originating from Asia that preys on ash trees.
It was first discovered in Canada in 2002 and discovered in Oakville in 2008.
During the relatively short time that EAB has been in North American, it has built up its populations to damaging levels and is believed to have killed in excess of 20 million trees in the U.S. and Canada.
The EAB larvae feed on the soft tissue underneath the bark of the tree, preventing the movement of water and nutrients and resulting in the death of the tree.
Typically, within six years of an infestation arriving in a woodlot, more than 99 per cent of the ash trees will have been killed.

More information on EAB can be found on the Natural Resources Canada website.


Sign up for the town’s RSS feeds

to get information delivered right to your desktop.

Continue reading: 

Town continues ash tree removals from EAB-infested woodlands

Council approves Fire Master Plan

Monday, November 21, 2016 – for immediate release

Council approves Fire Master Plan

On November 14, 2016, Council approved a Fire Master Plan that will ensure Oakville’s fire services will meet the future needs of the growing community. The plan will guide the delivery of fire protection and emergency services over the next ten and fifteen years.

“The safety of our community is of utmost importance,” said Mayor Rob Burton. “With this plan in place, residents can be assured that the Oakville Fire department will continue to provide an exceptional level of service as our community expands.”

The Fire Master Plan includes an assessment of all operations and divisions within the Oakville Fire department including fire stations and trucks, staffing, apparatus and equipment, fire prevention and public education programs, communications and emergency planning.

Included in the plan’s 43 recommendations is the addition of a new station (Station 8) near the intersection of Bronte Road and Pine Glen Road and the future relocation of Station 9 from its current location on Neyagawa Boulevard closer to the intersection of Burnhamthorpe Road and Sixth Line. These recommendations are aimed at addressing the growth of new neighbourhoods in North Oakville as well as increased development in existing areas of town.

The Fire Master Plan was developed based on stakeholder and public input, community needs as well as current research and best practice. It includes strategies and recommendations that are consistent with the master planning processes outlined by the Office of the Fire Marshal and the Emergency Management, Ontario (OFMEM).

“Our focus is reducing fires and safety risks by optimizing three lines of defense – public education and prevention, safety standards and enforcement and emergency response,” said Fire Chief, Brian Durdin. “It’s a proactive strategy that helps keep the community safe, and helps manage the cost of fire suppression services.”

For more information, visit the Fire Master Plan page.


Sign up for the town’s RSS feeds

to get information delivered right to your desktop.

Continue reading:

Council approves Fire Master Plan

Pokémon GO while visiting Burlington

Have you heard about Pokémon GO?  We kid, even if you would never play Pokémon GO, chances are you’ve heard of it.  I have to admit that while I wasn’t an early adapter who managed to download it before it was available in … Continue reading →

The post Pokémon GO while visiting Burlington appeared first on Tourism Burlington.

View original – 

Pokémon GO while visiting Burlington

Town Council declares Ward 2 Town Councillor seat vacant

Wednesday, November 18, 2015 – for immediate release

Town Council declares Ward 2 Town Councillor seat vacant

By-election to be called in January 2016

On November 16, 2015, Oakville Town Council officially declared the office for Ward 2, Town Councillor vacant. A Special Meeting of Council will be held on Monday, January 11, 2016 to introduce a by-law calling for a by-election.

Upon approval of the by-law, nominations may be filed starting Tuesday, January 12 until Friday, February 26, 2016. Voting Day will be held Monday April 11, 2016.

The Ward 2, Town Council seat became vacant when Pam Damoff became the Member of Parliament for Oakville North Burlington during the 2015 Federal Election.

The boundary for Ward 2 is Lake Ontario to the south, Sixteen Mile Creek to the east, QEW/403 to the north, and Third Line to the West.


Sign up for the town’s RSS feeds

to get information delivered right to your desktop.

Continue reading here: 

Town Council declares Ward 2 Town Councillor seat vacant

Town launches mobile app to enhance customer service

Thursday, October 22, 2015 – for immediate release

Town launches mobile app to enhance customer service

Be in the know and get connected — anywhere, anytime — with the official mobile app for the Town of Oakville.

Want a new way to access information and stay connected with the Town of Oakville? There’s now an app for that! The official Oakville mobile app gives residents and businesses a quick and convenient way to engage and interact with the town.

“Council actively encourages and supports new innovative ideas to connect and communicate with residents,” said Mayor Rob Burton. “The Oakville mobile app will make it easy for residents to stay up-to-date with town information right from their smartphone at any time, from anywhere.”

Available in the iTunes App Store for Apple devices and in Google Play for Android devices, the Oakville app is full of features that make it easy for citizens to access information about town news, service updates and events.

You can also share a concern or submit a service request, connect with the Mayor and your Members of Council, follow the town’s social media channels, and easily access the recreational drop-in program app, Active Oakville. Additional features include the ability for users to locate the closest parks, facilities, cycle ways and trails, and to receive timely alerts about significant service disruptions and weather events.

Oakville’s mobile app is a welcome addition to a roster of innovative online services the town offers its residents on oakville.ca including the temporary on-street parking permit form, new interactive mapping tools for active building permits, parks and sports fields amenities as well as FindOakville — the town’s new site selection tool that allows users to search for available commercial and industrial buildings, and vacant employment land.

As this is the first phase of the project, new features will be added as the town continues to transform the way it delivers service, engages with the community and promotes open, accessible and accountable government. Later this year, Oakville Transit is implementing an Intelligent Transportation System that works with GPS technology to track buses in real-time.

“Council is always looking for opportunities to best serve our citizens whether by phone, in person or online. We look forward to expanding our online services in today’s increasingly mobile and digitally connected society,” added Mayor Burton.

The Oakville mobile app is available for use on Apple and Android smartphones and tablets:

Download the Oakville app for iPhone 
Download the Oakville app for Android 

Purple Forge (www.purpleforge.com), a leading provider of mobile application services to governments across North America and around the world, is the vendor for the Oakville mobile app. Their mobile applications allow- governments to engage with their citizens and keep them informed about routine information, or push alerts to them in case of emergencies. Supporting a broad range of applications, Purple Forge is helping cities to become smarter and more responsive to their citizens’ needs.


Sign up for the town’s RSS feeds

to get information delivered right to your desktop.

Link: 

Town launches mobile app to enhance customer service

Mentorship in real estate

Mentorship comes in different shapes and patterns, but many REALTORS® can benefit from the guidance of others, no matter how that mentoring is delivered.

From one-on-one sessions to group meetings and formalized training programs, mentorship in real estate takes many forms. Various methods and strategies are used by REALTORS® in Ontario to encourage and support learning. The REALTOR® EDGE newsletter spoke with various professionals who talked about the importance of sharing and passing on knowledge.

Anna Vozza, a Windsor REALTOR®, entered the real estate business 15 years ago to work for an independent brokerage. Now a director at the Ontario Real Estate Association, Vozza says she has had the good fortune to be mentored informally by the brokerage owner, Bob Pedler.

“He is my grandfather’s age, and he mentored me and took me under his wing,” Vozza says. “He has been the president of organizations of every level of real estate, and I want to follow in his footsteps. I am a leader now in real estate because he pushed me.”

“Having a mentor who shares his wisdom and experience has been a godsend.”

Each morning of the business week, Vozza has coffee and an informal chat in the office with her mentor.

“It’s one-on-one time where we talk over the coming day, the listings and the issues arising from deals that are on the go,” Vozza says. “He has taught me that nothing is unachievable if I put my mind to it. During my first commercial deal, he stood by in case there were problems, but he kept encouraging me and telling me, ‘You can do it.’ ”

Vozza believes that success in real estate “isn’t something you can learn from a book. We’re in the business of building relationships.” Having a mentor who shares his wisdom and experience has been a godsend, she says. “Depending on what’s going on at the time, he can be a listener, advisor or coach,” she says. “My mentor listens to me vent, is a sounding board in a deal, gets me back on track positively and helps me work through the next deal. He also advises me on how to deal with different personalities.”

Formal Mentorship

When Sue Symons first became a REALTOR® seven-and-a-half years ago, she was assigned to a mentor at the office where she was based. “The broker assessed people to see if there would be a good fit between mentor and protégé,” she says of the brokerage’s mentorship program. “The mentor had to have experience, but the match was based on the broker’s assessment of whether the two personalities would work well together.”

Symons was paired with the same REALTOR® who had sold her home, a woman with several years of experience. “It was the right fit for me,” Symons says. “My mentor was client-focused and she is one of the hardest workers I know. Our mentoring process was fairly informal. We discussed how to write a deal or talked about wells, tanks and technical things. She also brought me in and trained me on things like running an effective open house.”

The benefits of mentorship became very clear from that experience, says Symons.  She is now the owner and broker of record at her own North Bay real estate brokerage, with 28 REALTORS® on site. Symons has established a mentorship program at her own brokerage that combines mentorship with formal training. The mentorship officially lasts a year, but informally, it can continue forever. “The value of teaching people to be true professionals is so important,” she says.

Each REALTOR® who joins Symons’ brokerage is required to attend a week of intensive training, along with scheduled weekly sales training sessions that address topics such as how to build trust and technical subjects such as understanding agency agreements. Although these sessions are mandatory for new salespeople, they are open to everyone.

“Our whole office has a mentorship focus,” Symons says. “We spend a lot of time on training and mentoring, and everyone is encouraged to ask for and provide help to others. I would call it a mentoring environment.”

Mentoring even comes into play when Symons works with a client, something she does not do often in her current role as broker of record, unless the client insists on her services. In that case, she will take the project on as a co-listing with one of her REALTORS® and use it as a teaching opportunity.

“Mentoring people through the entire sales process is a great way to help them when they’re getting started in this business,” Symons says.


Read the September EDGE
Complaints service helps at stressful time
Serving buyers in the pre-construction phase


Many Minds Are Better Than One

At the Toronto brokerage where Bill Johnston works as a REALTOR®, mentorship takes the form of collective wisdom through a process the firm calls Mastermind. Every Wednesday morning, many of the REALTORS® gather in a conference room to come up with solutions to problems posed by individual salespeople or brokers.

“For anyone with an issue or concern, that group can brainstorm,” says Johnston, who has been in the business for 33 years. “That session is the most practical and beneficial mentorship I’ve come across during my years in real estate. It is very concrete and specific, and we get a lot of input and insights.”

The session lasts one hour. The facilitator is usually one of the managers at the brokerage who keeps strict track of the time since everyone has a busy day ahead.

“I support the group approach,” says Johnston. “Although it can be helpful to have one person as a sounding board, too much one-on-one mentoring can foster dependency, and the mentor may not always be around. REALTORS® need to learn to be self-sufficient.”

“It’s up to the facilitator to keep the discussion moving so that topics don’t get left behind or beaten to death,” Johnston says. “It’s fair to say that there is at least one answer offered for every problem. Even after 33 years, I still learn new things at these meetings.”

Mentoring Advice for Brokers:

  1. Set up a mentoring program. These programs help new people and enhance the professionalism of the industry across the board
  2. Reach out to other brokers who have programs. Sharing knowledge reduces the need to re-invent the wheel.
  3. It doesn’t have to be complicated. A mentorship program is simply an opportunity for people to learn from others and apply those lessons. It can be as simple as you make it.
  4. Mentoring programs support ongoing learning. Continuous learning is worthwhile even for seasoned professionals. These programs get everyone thinking and involved.
  5. REALTORS® are honoured to be asked to participate. They see it as a responsibility and take it seriously.
  6. Emphasize the value of seeing other REALTORS® as part of the family. Help other agents and learn from them. The more you give back, the more you gain, ten-fold.
  7. Mentorship teaches the importance of being a good self-manager. This business provides a great deal of freedom but there is also lots of room to fail. Mentorship keeps the focus on self-discipline, professionalism, due diligence and good work habits.

Story by Elaine Smith

Sources: Bill Johnston, Sue Symons, Anna Vozza

For more information on mentorship in real estate, the OREA Real Estate College has produced A Mentoring Kit for New Salespeople. The kit contains chapters on resources, planning, sales, skills and professionalism, along with CDs and information on how real estate is structured in Ontario. It can be purchased for $10 plus tax. To purchase the kit through OREA’s e-Store, visit www.orea.com and click on OREA Real Estate College and then on Learning Tools to find A Mentoring Kit for New Salespeople. You can also order the kit by telephone by calling (416) 391-6732 or toll-free 1-866-411 6732 and speaking with one of OREA’s customer service representatives.

Continue reading here:  

Mentorship in real estate