OMB approves Bronte Green application for development of former Saw-Whet Golf Course lands

Thursday, July 6, 2017 – for immediate release

OMB approves Bronte Green application for development of former Saw-Whet Golf Course lands

Decision approves settlement negotiated last fall

The Ontario Municipal Board (OMB) has released its decision formally approving the negotiated settlement that was reached between the Town of Oakville, the Region of Halton, Conservation Halton and Bronte Green last fall concerning the development of the lands at 1401 Bronte Road.

“The OMB’s decision to approve the town’s settlement with Bronte Green was the best possible outcome that we could achieve at the OMB,” Mayor Burton said. “In the settlement, Bronte Green agreed to significant concessions to respond to all of the issues raised by the town including protecting green space and addressing key environmental concerns over wildlife and flood protection. While it would have been desirable to preserve all this land, legally that was simply not possible in this case.”

The approved development proposal permits Bronte Green to build a residential community with limited retail, and a mix of single family homes, townhouses and low-rise apartments located on Bronte Road. This proposed transit-friendly community will also include a school, parks and a trail system while preserving sensitive environmental lands that are critical habitat to endangered and other species of wildlife.

The town had opposed the original Bronte Green application as being premature and not in the public interest. This position was based on serious concerns with the draft plan and the underlying technical studies. The town engaged a team of 15 witnesses representing a variety of scientific and planning disciplines to put forth its case.

Following extensive negotiations, Bronte Green made significant changes to its original development proposal to reflect the concerns raised by the Town of Oakville, Region of Halton, Conservation Halton and the community. These changes included:

Dedicating a significant parcel of land to enhance the woodlands
Creating a high value habitat for species including snapping turtles.
Increasing the size of the buffer around the natural features from 10 to 30 metres in order to better protect the natural heritage system from the impacts of development and to reduce flood and erosion impacts.
Constructing storm water management systems which insure that there will be no additional risk of downstream flooding.
Removing the vehicular bridge previously proposed over the Fourteen Mile Creek which posed a threat to endangered species of fish.
Securing a permanent natural heritage linkage to Bronte Creek Provincial Park.
Reserving an elementary school site adjacent to a centrally located neighbourhood park.
Increasing density on portions of the site to support transit-friendly development along Bronte Road, and preserve more parkland

For more information visit the Bronte Green Corporation development application page.


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OMB approves Bronte Green application for development of former Saw-Whet Golf Course lands

Town continues ash tree removals from EAB-infested woodlands

Residents are invited to learn more at community open house on January 11, 2017

This winter, as weather and ground conditions permit, the town’s contractor will begin year three of the Woodlands Hazard Abatement program to remove ash trees destroyed by the Emerald Ash Borer (EAB) from town woodlands. The town is removing dead and dying trees near public trails and bordering properties for safety and to allow new trees to grow. Trails may be temporarily closed as the work is carried out.

Residents are invited to an open house at Town Hall on January 11, 2017, from 6 to 8 p.m. to learn more.

While natural regeneration will account for most of the regrowth in the woodlands, the town is establishing a number of planting sites in select areas to help the urban forest regrow.

“A thriving tree canopy brings tremendous environmental, health and economic benefits to a community, which is why Council has made growing Oakville’s urban forest a key part of our livable Oakville vision,” said Mayor Rob Burton. “Even in the face of disease, ice storms and EAB, our efforts to grow Oakville’s tree canopy have been paying off. We will continue to build on that success in 2017 and for many years to come.”

Following tree removals, logs, branches and wood debris are left on the forest floor to eventually break down, nourish the soil, and aid in the regrowth of shrubs and trees.

“The town is following a comprehensive management program to help our woodlands regrow after the impact of EAB, including natural regeneration and intensive planting sites. Over 14 hectares (34.6 acres) of woodland properties have been replanted to date,” said Chris Mark, director, Parks and Open Space. “We encourage residents to come to the open house and talk with our forestry experts to learn how EAB has affected our woodlands and how they will regrow.”

Removal of woodland ash trees is a multi-year program. Woodlands with more than 50 per cent ash population are a priority. Once these woodlands are completed, the town will begin removals in the woodlands with less than 50 per cent ash population.

The town will also remove some invasive species and trees other than ash that are identified as structurally unsound or are over-crowding the forest. By following this sustainable forest management approach, the Town of Oakville is the first lower-tier municipality in Canada to have all of its woodlands achieve Forest Stewardship Council® (FSC®) certification through the forest certification program of the Eastern Ontario Model Forest. The FSC® is an international, membership-based, non-profit organization that supports environmentally appropriate, socially beneficial, and economically viable management of the world’s forests.

The town continues to manage EAB in our active parks and on the road allowance, and has successfully treated over 3,800 ash trees, which are still healthy, with the bio insecticide TreeAzin to save them from the destructive insect.

To get information about the town’s EAB management program, visit the trees and woodlands page.

EAB facts:

EAB is a highly destructive insect originating from Asia that preys on ash trees.
It was first discovered in Canada in 2002 and discovered in Oakville in 2008.
During the relatively short time that EAB has been in North American, it has built up its populations to damaging levels and is believed to have killed in excess of 20 million trees in the U.S. and Canada.
The EAB larvae feed on the soft tissue underneath the bark of the tree, preventing the movement of water and nutrients and resulting in the death of the tree.
Typically, within six years of an infestation arriving in a woodlot, more than 99 per cent of the ash trees will have been killed.

More information on EAB can be found on the Natural Resources Canada website.


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Town’s new video demonstrates what to do if you encounter a coyote

Monday, June 6, 2016 – for immediate release

Town’s new video demonstrates what to do if you encounter a coyote

Hazing video part of the town’s public awareness campaign to reduce coyote conflicts

While seeing a coyote in Oakville is not necessarily cause for alarm, there is an understandable concern when coyotes come a bit too close for comfort. The town’s new coyote hazing video explains what to do if you encounter a coyote on your property, and demonstrates how to “haze” or scare away coyotes so they do not feel comfortable being around people.

Though coyotes are commonly found in urban areas such as Oakville, they are usually wary animals and are not considered to be a significant risk to people. However, intentional and unintentional feeding, tolerating them on our property, and allowing pets to roam freely contribute to coyotes losing their inhibitions towards people and becoming more brazen around domestic pets.

“With a healthy fear of humans, coyotes can co-exist peacefully with us. This short video gives some simple instructions on how we can help maintain a coyote’s fear of humans and deter them from approaching our backyards and play spaces,” said Cindy Toth, director, Environmental Policy.

Hazing involves using actions and loud noises to make the coyote feel uncomfortable and unwelcome. The video shows the simplest method of hazing a coyote is being loud, appearing large and shouting at it to “go away!” Other techniques include spraying with a hose, throwing small sticks, or waving a rake or other large or shiny objects.

While regular hazing around your home and neighbourhood is important, the video advises not to haze coyotes in their natural environment such as woodlands where they may have dens. Staying on trails and keeping dogs on a short leash is especially important this time of year when coyote pups may be in the den or out seeking food such as grasshoppers and mice in wooded or grassy areas.

The video also recommends residents ensure their property is an unwelcome environment by removing attractants such as pet food, compost, and brush piles, and not leaving pets unattended outdoors.

The video was produced in response to an increase in coyote sightings in Oakville last winter and joins a number of measures the town has put in place to help minimize coyote disturbances. The town’s coyote public awareness program includes:

coyote awareness signs in key areas where coyotes have been sighted;
community workshops and education session in areas where increased coyote activity is reported;
wildlife-proof lids on garbage bins throughout the town;
notices to residents in key areas as a reminder to not dump household refuse or food waste in town bins, parks or trails;
enforced town by-laws including littering, property standards, and dogs off leash;
a coyote reporting form and mapping feature on the town’s website.

The coyote hazing video can be found on the town’s YouTube channel or on the coyote page.


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Play, forget work

Work is necessary, but it is such a tedious task. Indeed, work can be numbing. Playing, on the other hand, is pleasurable but arguably unnecessary. From a learning perspective, I do not accept either sentiments.

Look at young children reveling in pure play. They are curious, connected, and hard at work in unadulterated fun. They are not distracted by stressful schedules, tasks, or deliverables. They party in the moment with total commitment of body and mind.

Look at old folks leisurely smiling, laughing, and enjoying each other’s company while sitting, walking, or playing with youthful vigor. They are not limited by slowness or the natural aging of their bodies. They remain lighthearted, even playfully ornery.

Young children and old folks are natural playmates for each other. Put them together and learning is at its pinnacle. Between the very young and very old, we have our job, our working life. What a wonderful world it would be if we could put play in our work. It would transform our education systems and careers, and extend our potential to learn.

Of course you know that leisure and play are tandem activities. Did you know that the original Greek and Roman meaning of the word ‘school’ is ‘leisure’?

 

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Play, forget work

Questions Recreational REALTORS® Should Ask

Summertime… and the living is easy… unless you’re representing buyers interested in purchasing a recreational property, and these transactions require you to complete due diligence on matters unique to this property type.

Following are three basic steps to consider in these types of transaction.

First, determine which type of recreational property your clients want or can afford. They fall into five categories: seasonal (non-winterized and only used during the summer months), winterized year-round cottages, country homes, chalets, and hobby farms.

Second, determine if there are any title and legal issues surrounding the property, such as:

•  easements or encroachments

•  legal restrictions or rights

•  disputes concerning property boundaries

•  disputes concerning ownership of fences

•  ownership of shoreline

•  location of improvements made to the property

•  local zoning bylaws

•  impact of the Ministry of Natural Resources

•  property accessibility via private road

Third, determine services to the property, such as:

•  sewers or septic system

•  location, size, and maintenance of septic system

•  water supply source (e.g., municipal, private well, community well)

•  quality and quality of water (if not municipal)

 

The above is not a comprehensive list. It is meant to help you recognize the uniqueness of selling these types of properties.

 

 

Reference: Ontario Real Estate Association and Acronamic Learning Systems Inc. (May 2015). The Residential Real Estate Transaction. Don Mills, ON: Ontario Real Estate Association.

 

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Questions Recreational REALTORS® Should Ask

What’s happening at Town Hall — June 15 to 19, 2015

Friday, June 12, 2015 – for immediate release

What’s happening at Town Hall — June 15 to 19, 2015

Do you want to know what’s happening at Town Hall? Are you interested in participating in local government? Here’s a highlight of what’s happening June 15 to June 20, 2015.

June 15

Planning and Development Council
Location: Town Hall, Council Chamber, 7 – 10 p.m.

Consent items
Assumption of Subdivision Plan 20M-930 – Upper Glen Abbey Greens Phase 2, By-law 2015-057, West of Bronte Road, South of Dundas Street
Subdivision Agreement – Davis Minardi 2A (North), South of Burnhamthorpe Road West, West of Neyagawa Boulevard

Public hearing items
Public meeting and recommendation report – Zoning By-law amendment, First Gulf Corporation, 610 Chartwell Road (formerly 514 South Service Road East) Z1611.16 – By-law 2015-070 and By-law 2015-076
Public meeting and recommendation report – town-initiated Official Plan amendment, Natural Heritage System Partial Expansion, Fourteen Mile Creek Valley, File No. 42.24.015, By-law 2015-069

Discussion items
42 Lakeshore Road West update
Notice of intention to demolish – 149 Balsam Drive

Advisory Committee minutes
Heritage Oakville Advisory Committee (May 26, 2015)

June 16

Open house – Employment and Commercial review 
Location: Sixteen Mile Sports Complex, Community Room 1, 6–8 p.m.

June 17

Property Standards Committee 
Location: Town Hall, Bronte Room, 2–4:30 p.m.

EAB open house 
Location: Sixteen Mile Sports Complex, 6:30–8:30 p.m.

June 19

Appeals Committee
Location: Town Hall, Bronte Room, 10–11:30 a.m.

June 20

Advance voting for Ward 6 Oakville Municipal By-election 
Locations:

Iroquois Ridge Community Centre, 1051 Glenashton Drive, 10 a.m.–5 p.m.
Town Hall, 1225 Trafalgar Road, 10 a.m.–5 p.m.

What’s happening at Town Hall provides an overview of upcoming Town of Oakville meetings and other events. The public is welcome to attend these meetings. For agendas and copies of reports, please visit the agendas and minutes page. For more information and additional upcoming meetings, please visit the Council calendar or news and notices page.

For more information

Kathy Patrick
Supervisor, Council and Committee Services
Town of Oakville
905-845-6601, ext. 4235
kathy.patrick@oakville.ca


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What’s happening at Town Hall — June 15 to 19, 2015

New Minister of Government and Consumer Services, the Honourable David Orazietti.

Premier Kathleen Wynne appointed her new cabinet in late June, including the new Minister of Government and Consumer Services (MGCS), the Honourable David Orazietti.

The Ministry of Government and Consumer Services (MGCS) works to protect Ontario consumers and ensure we all enjoy a fair, safe, and informed marketplace. The Ministry also implements regulatory practices that contribute to a vibrant and competitive provincial economy. In addition, the Ministry is responsible for the Real Estate and Business Brokers Act, 2002.

Mr. Orazietti was first elected to the Ontario Legislature in 2003 as the MPP for Sault Ste. Marie. Before his appointment to the Ministry of Government and Consumer Services, Mr. Orazietti served as Minister of Natural Resources in 2013. Beyond his ministerial appointments, Mr. Orazietti boasts an impressive career in public service. He has held many parliamentary assistantships including: Assistant to the Premier, Education, Natural Resources, Aboriginal Affairs, and Northern Development and Mines.

Before entering provincial politics, the Minister worked as a secondary school teacher for 10 years and served two terms as a city councillor.

REALTORS® recognize the important impact MGCS has on our industry. In the previous parliament, OREA worked closely with then-Minister of Consumer Services, the Honourable Tracy MacCharles on numerous issues, including: amendments to Bill 55- Stronger Protection for Ontario Consumers Act, 2014; the panel on home inspector minimum qualifications; and, the Condominium Act, 1998 Review.

We developed a strong working relationship with Minister MacCharles, and while we’re sad to see her leave MCS, we wish her all the best in her new portfolio and look forward to working with Minister Orazietti.

Continued here – 

New Minister of Government and Consumer Services, the Honourable David Orazietti.

North Oakville Trails Plan ensures a sustainable and healthy Oakville

Friday, May 24, 2013 – for immediate release

North Oakville Trails Plan ensures a sustainable and healthy Oakville

Trails plan protects Natural Heritage System and connects communities

Oakville’s 150+ kilometres of trails is about to expand! An extensive and connected trail system, designed specifically to link the New Communities of Oakville located north of Dundas Street, was approved by Planning and Development Council on Tuesday night. All trails will be integrated into the new communities of Sixteen Hollow, 407 West, Glenorchy, and Joshua’s Meadows over time, and will control access into the Natural Heritage System, a preserved green space of over 900 hectares.

“Oakville is unique and there needs to be a focus on providing opportunities for walking and cycling, and reducing reliance on roads. Our North Oakville Trails System provides that opportunity,” Mayor Rob Burton said. “As well, a connected trail system like this brings sustained health and ecological benefits for our community.”

The hierarchy of trails includes multi-use trails, major trails and minor trails, as well as a network of on-road cycle lanes and bike routes, many of which will provide access to the primary Active Transportation Master Plan network.

Multi-use trails

off road (within boulevard or community parks), hard surfaced trails, typically 3 metres wide
are fully accessible and intended for shared use by pedestrians, cyclists, in-line skaters, etc.
allow for year-round maintenance
form part of the Active Transportation Master Plan
will not be constructed within the Natural Heritage System
provide access to adjacent neighbourhoods

Major trails

off road, soft-surfaced trails (compacted limestone screenings) through natural areas, open space corridors, typically 2.1 to 2.4 metres wide
intended for pedestrian, cyclists and passive recreational use
accessible where possible
typically seasonal use, will not receive winter maintenance

Minor trails

off road, soft surfaced materials (limestone screenings, wood chips, natural compacted ground) through natural areas and valley systems, typically 1 to 1.5 metres wide
intended for pedestrian, cyclists for passive recreational use
seasonal use, will not receive winter maintenance
limited accessibility
provide enhanced circulation and improves access to major trail network

Over the last year, meetings with stakeholders and the public played a key role in developing the trails plan. In addition, a Council sub-committee was established for the purpose of hearing presentations and receiving comments about the trails within the Natural Heritage System.

The North Oakville Trails plan is one of several master plans included in Vision 2057. Together, with other key planning initiatives, they will shape the town’s future, creating a more livable and sustainable Oakville. To review the trails plan visit the North Oakville Trails Plan page. 

Media contact:

Gisèle Shaw
Manager, Corporate Communications
Town of Oakville
905-845-6601, ext. 3166
gshaw@oakville.ca


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North Oakville Trails Plan ensures a sustainable and healthy Oakville

What’s happening at Town Hall – July 3 to 6, 2012

Friday, June 29, 2012 – for immediate release

What’s happening at Town Hall – July 3 to 6, 2012

Do you want to know what’s happening at Town Hall? Are you interested in participating in local government? Here’s a highlight of what’s happening July 3 to 6, 2012.

July 3

inZone Subcommittee
Location: Town Hall, Committee Room 1 and 2, 1 to 3:30 p.m.

Site Plan Committee
Location: Town Hall, Trafalgar Room, 5 to 7 p.m.

Planning and Development Council
Location: Town Hall, Council Chamber, 7 to 10 p.m.

Consent items
Extension to Draft Plan of Subdivision Approval for Silwell Development Limited (Metrontario Group) for Part of Lots 13, 14 & 15, Concession 1 S.D.S.
453 Wedgewood Drive and 1315 Ario Road – Ontario Municipal Board decisions

Discussion items
Notice of Intention to Designate – 39 Jones Street
Business Leaders Forum and Corporate Calling
Oakville Transportation Master Plan – Switching Gears (2031) Draft Study Report
2012 Trade Mission to China

July 4

Community Services Committee
Location: Town Hall, Council Chamber, 7 to 10 p.m.

Consent items
Acquisition of water lot lands from Ministry of Natural Resources
Grant of Permanent Easement to the Regional Municipality of Halton on Dundas Street East
Sale of Surplus Lands to Fernbrook Homes (Bronte 15) Limited

Discussion items
Environmental Strategic Plan (ESP) – 2011 Implementation Update
CUTA Transit Vision 2040
Health Protection Air Quality By-law Implementation Status and Air Quality Initiatives Update

Administrative Services Committee
Location: Town Hall, Committee Rooms 1 and 2, 7 to 10 p.m.

Consent item
License Renewal – Glenashton Park – East side of Eighth Line, north of Glenashton Drive

Discussion items
Regulation of Tanning Salons
2011 Municipal Performance Measures (MPMP)
Policy and Procedure Update Report
Bronte Harbour Yacht Club (BHYC)

What’s Happening at Town Hall provides an overview of upcoming Town of Oakville meetings and other events. The public is welcome to attend these meetings. For agendas and copies of reports, please visit Agendas and Minutes. For more information and additional upcoming meetings, please visit the Council Calendar or News and Notices.

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For more information

Kathy Patrick
Supervisor, Council and Committee Services
Town of Oakville
905-845-6601, ext. 4235
kpatrick@oakville.ca


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What’s happening at Town Hall – July 3 to 6, 2012

North Oakville Urban Forest Strategic Management Plan ensures a sustainable and healthy urban forest

Thursday, May 24, 2012 – for immediate release

North Oakville Urban Forest Strategic Management Plan ensures a sustainable and healthy urban forest

Oakville’s Planning and Development Council approved the innovative North Oakville Urban Forest Strategic Management Plan on Tuesday night, ensuring a sustainable and healthy urban forest for the lands located north of Dundas Street. The plan, which impacts overall planning for residential, commercial and industrial lands, recommends a multi-faceted strategy that connects urban forestry best practices to existing environmental features in Oakville’s Natural Heritage System.

“North Oakville is unique and there needs to be a focus on maximizing opportunities for tree growth,” Mayor Rob Burton said. “This will take careful planning as there will be challenges with introducing these new standards. The long-term benefits, however, will be the sustained ecological health of our community.”

Under the plan, trees are identified as green infrastructure and their location and suitability will now be addressed at the onset of the planning process. Development applications will be required to provide detailed locations and soil volume of all trees in composite utility plans. This ensures the placement of trees will receive equal consideration as the location for the placement of other services, such as water or gas utilities.

Implementation of the plan will occur through amendments to the zoning by-law following a best practices review by staff of other southern Ontario municipalities. Changes to the site plan and subdivision requirements will be reflected in updated conditions of approval. Opportunities to maximize tree canopy coverage will be further strengthened through landscape standards, detailed land use policies, and conceptual plans for new parklands. Tools have been developed to assist staff in accurately assessing existing and proposed canopy coverage for each development site to ensure targets are met.

The plan also outlines updated standards that boost tree planting requirements on parklands, landscape strips, buffer areas, parking lots and storm water management ponds as well as dictates soil depth and volume for medium and large stature trees.

To ensure the successful realization of the new plan, the town acknowledges that it will take a concerted effort. As a result, the plan calls for the establishment of partnerships with community and environmental groups along with other public agencies, levels of government and the private sector to encourage participation in this planning and preservation initiative.

The strategic management plan is one of several master plans included in Vision 2057. Together, with other key planning initiatives, they will shape the town’s future, creating a more livable and sustainable Oakville.

For more information visit the North Oakville Urban Forest Strategic Management Plan page.

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Media contact

Chris Mark
Director, Parks and Open Space
905-845-6601, ext. 3111
cmark@oakville.ca

Kimberly Moser
Senior Communications Advisor
905-845-6601, ext. 3096
kmoser@oakville.ca


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North Oakville Urban Forest Strategic Management Plan ensures a sustainable and healthy urban forest