AVL technology improving services for Oakville residents

Wednesday, July 5, 2017 – for immediate release

AVL technology improving services for Oakville residents

Automatic Vehicle Locators being used on buses, fire trucks and public works vehicles

Technology that allows the Town of Oakville to pinpoint the exact location of its buses, public works vehicles and fire trucks in real-time is resulting in significant service improvements for residents according to a staff presentation made to Council on June 26, 2017.

Automatic Vehicle Locators (AVL) are devices that work with GPS (Global Positioning System) and a wireless radio system to transmit information about a vehicle’s current location. It’s a powerful tool that helps the town manage fleets of vehicles and ensure that service levels are being met.

“In today’s digitally-driven world, municipal governments have to constantly evolve to continue providing high-quality services to our residents,” said Mayor Rob Burton. “AVL technology is helping the town provide citizens with on-demand information, tools and services they can easily access from their mobile devices.”

For Oakville Transit customers, AVL technology allows them to track their bus in real-time from their computer or mobile phone so they can know exactly when it will arrive at their stop. Digital signs onboard buses and automated voice announcements advising customers of next stop information are also features made possible by this technology.

The Roads and Works department is also using AVL technology to provide better communication to residents about snow clearing. Residents can now track the progress of plows in real-time as they clear roads by using the PlowOakville online tool. Staff also use the technology to accurately monitor and track the amount of salt their trucks distribute on the roads.

AVL and GPS technology are not only making town services more accessible and convenient for residents, these tools are also helping the Oakville Fire Department cut down response times and get to the scene of an emergency sooner. When a fire crew is dispatched on a call, they can now access the call information from a computer tablet within the fire truck.

“In an emergency situation every second counts and this technology gives our crews the most accurate, up-to-date mapping information available so they can respond as quickly as possible,” said Fire Chief Brian Durdin.

The town is continuing to invest in new technology and innovative solutions to serve the community more efficiently and effectively. Other initiatives currently underway include a new pay by phone mobile app for municipal parking lots, and a mobile-friendly update to oakville.ca coming later this month.


Sign up for the town’s RSS feeds

to get information delivered right to your desktop.

Visit site – 

AVL technology improving services for Oakville residents

Councillor Adams appointed chair of 2018 Budget Committee

Town plans for continued inflation level tax increases

At the inaugural 2018 Budget Committee meeting on June 26, 2017, Councillor Tom Adams was appointed as Oakville’s budget chair for the tenth consecutive year. Councillor Adams holds his Master’s in Business Administration from McMaster University and is a former senior risk manager to one of Canada’s major financial institutions.

Oakville is committed to offering valued services and programs to residents and making strategic investments in community priorities. Each year the town’s budget is one of the most important tasks facing Town Council, who have directed staff to prepare a budget that keeps the overall tax increase in line with inflation. The target for 2018 has been set at an overall property tax increase of 1.8 per cent, including the town, Regional and educational shares of the property tax bill.

Key budget pressures outlined by Nancy Sully, deputy treasurer and director, Financial Planning, include $1.4 million to implement the increased minimum wage announced recently by the Province, and $1.3 million in costs related to growth in the town including the operation of new transit vehicles, the cost to maintain new parks and roads, as well as costs associated with operating the new Trafalgar Park Community Centre (redeveloped Oakville Arena) and a proposed library.

The town will be looking at transforming the way services are delivered in order to respond to budget pressures in 2019 and 2020 relating to Trafalgar Park and the opening of the Southeast Community Centre (on the former hospital lands), a new fire station in Palermo, as well as other funding needs. Council has directed staff to keep overall property tax increases in line with inflation in both 2019 and 2020.

“The town is at the point where we must move beyond simple cost containment measures to keep tax increases at the rate of inflation in future years,” said CAO Ray Green. “Council, staff and the community will need to work together to set priorities, and look for opportunities to transform the way we deliver services.”

Green recommended a comprehensive reshaping of the organization that will enable the town to meet the overall budget target set by Council and create a longer-term vision for the financial sustainability of town operations.

“Oakville is recognized as having the healthiest finances in Ontario, and keeping those finances strong and secure is a key part of Council’s vision to make Oakville the most livable town in Canada,” said Mayor Rob Burton. “Staff have made us aware of potential pressures on the horizon, and recommended we take proactive steps to address them. We are confident that taking early action will help assure the long-term health of Oakville’s finances.”

Staff noted that the 2018 budget documents would be released on November 21, 2017. Staff will present the Budget Committee with an overview of the proposed 2018 operating and capital budgets, including opportunities for potential savings or increased revenues. The Budget Committee will hear input from pubic delegations before making a recommendation on December 12, 2017 to Council. Final Council approval of the operating and capital budgets is scheduled for December 18, 2017.

“Our key focus for this budget is to meet our goal of keeping overall property tax increases in line with inflation, while building and renewing infrastructure and maintaining high quality services for the community,” Councillor Adams said. “Public input is a critical piece of our annual budget process and I look forward to engaging with residents over the next few months.”

For more information, access the staff report included in the June 26, 2017 Budget Committee meeting agenda or visit the 2018 Budget page.


Sign up for the town’s RSS feeds

to get information delivered right to your desktop.

See more here:  

Councillor Adams appointed chair of 2018 Budget Committee

Former Hospital Site Project takes big step forward

Council endorses site master plan as well as base funding and amenities for community centre

The redevelopment project of the former Oakville-Trafalgar Memorial Hospital lands took a significant step forward at a Special Meeting last night when Town Council endorsed an overall master plan for the lands as well as the some programming and features for the Southeast Oakville Community Centre that is planned for the site.

“It is important for Council that our plan for the hospital lands reflect the needs and wishes of local residents,” said Mayor Burton. “We appreciate the thoughtful insight provided by community members throughout this consultation process, which has helped staff draft a plan that Council can fully support.”

Recently, residents from across Oakville were invited to share their thoughts on three proposed land use concepts for the overall site at a community workshop and through an online discussion forum. All three land use concepts include a community centre, a park and residential development but the arrangement was slightly different in each option.

While the feedback received was extensive both in person and online, there was no clear consensus on one particular option. However, certain themes and a common concept of establishing distinct districts did emerge with a residential district in the north, a civic district with a community centre and park in the middle, and a seniors-oriented housing district in the south.

With that in mind, the Council-endorsed former Oakville-Trafalgar Hospital Site Master Plan includes:

A residential area that complements the existing neighbourhood and maintains the character of the community as intended in the official plan.
A civic area that consolidates the community centre and parkland along Reynolds Street since it is the busiest street bounding the site, and allows the park space to be open, follow the principles of safe-park design and be highly accessible. The town also wants to explore the creation of a visible civic square in the area around the former high school. With Council’s approval of the master plan, exploration for re-use of the building will be required.
A seniors-oriented housing area that gives options for residents to down-size to smaller, more manageable properties or dwelling units without the need to leave the community. The area could range from independent seniors-living to assisted-care. Further discussions with members of the community and stakeholders will be needed to help define these opportunities.

The final master plan was also fully endorsed at last night’s meeting by the resident associations in Ward 3.

“What residents made clear during the consultation process is that the former hospital and high school played a critical role in anchoring and contributing to the neighbouring community’s identity,” added Mayor Rob Burton. “As such, the final master plan reflects the idea of maintaining that legacy for years to come.”

At last night’s meeting, Council also approved the following enhancements for the new Southeast Community Centre on the site expansion of the single gym to a double gym ($470,000); therapeutic warm-water pool ($2,740,000); fitness centre ($2,550,000) and; an indoor walking track ($1,800,000). These features are in addition to the amenities already planned for the community centre: indoor pool (to replace Centennial Pool), multi-purpose rooms and space for intergenerational programming.

A financial overview on the project was also received by Council which estimates the cost for entire project, including demolition, parking garage enhancements and community centre development, to be approximately $54 million. Town reserves are a primary funding source for this project. The sale of lands not used for a community centre or park is intended to replenish funding used from the reserve. This strategy is one way to ensure sufficient funding for other large, long term projects across the town in the future.

Moving ahead, the demolition contractors will begin site preparation this summer. The overall demolition and site remediation will take approximately 12 months to complete. The architectural/general contractor team responsible for the community centre will be selected in early July. The process of design will begin shortly afterwards. The development of the new community centre will begin in late 2018 with an opening scheduled for fall 2020.

A number of Planning Act approvals will also be necessary in order for the redevelopment of the site to proceed including official plan and zoning amendments, and draft plan of subdivision/site plan approvals. Amendments to the town’s Official Plan and Zoning By-law will be subject to the statutory planning process and a public meeting is expected in the fall with proposed Official Plan updates by the end of 2017.

The town plans on engaging with the public later this fall on the project including progress on the demolition work and next steps regarding the design of the community centre design and potential uses of the park.

Check out the June 27 Special Council Agenda for detail, including staff reports. For more information and to sign up for the town’s newsletter.


Sign up for the town’s RSS feeds

to get information delivered right to your desktop.

Originally posted here – 

Former Hospital Site Project takes big step forward

Outstanding volunteers honoured at 16th Annual Community Spirit Awards

Thursday, June 8, 2017 – for immediate release

Outstanding volunteers honoured at 16th Annual Community Spirit Awards

Oakville’s best and brightest volunteers were celebrated for their exemplary contributions to the community at the 16th Annual Community Spirit Awards held last night at Queen Elizabeth Park Community and Cultural Centre.

2017 Community Spirit Award recipients:

Bingo Rivera, Access Award sponsored by Access Abilities
William Smith, Arts Award sponsored by the Oakville Beaver
The Oakville Rotaract Club, Group Volunteer Award sponsored by the Town of Oakville
Mary Davidson, Heritage Award sponsored by Genworth Financial Canada
Jan Tingle, Individual Volunteer Award sponsored by Paradiso Restaurant
Peter Lowes, Senior Award sponsored by Chartwell Waterford Retirement Residence
Aiza Abid and Marica Pinnock, Youth Award sponsored by RBC Royal Bank

“On behalf of Council, I offer all the nominees and award recipients our sincere gratitude for your dedication, for inspiring others with your commitment, and for elevating the entire Oakville community with your spirit,” said Mayor Rob Burton.

Chris Mei, television host of the Weather Network, was the emcee for the evening, entertaining the audience while sponsors handed out the awards. Each recipient received a one-of-a-kind award created by local illustrator, designer and portrait artist Emily Soden.

Since 2002, Oakville’s Community Spirit Awards have recognized individuals and groups for their outstanding contributions to the community.

Visit the Community Spirit Awards page for more information about the awards and this year’s recipients.


Sign up for the town’s RSS feeds

to get information delivered right to your desktop.

Excerpt from:

Outstanding volunteers honoured at 16th Annual Community Spirit Awards

Council endorses Rogers Hometown Hockey event in downtown Oakville

Tuesday, May 30, 2017 – for immediate release

Council endorses Rogers Hometown Hockey event in downtown Oakville

Staff receives green light to proceed with plans for outdoor celebration in December 2017

Oakville hockey fans of all ages will have a chance to showcase their love of the game when the Rogers Hometown Hockey celebration comes to town this winter.

Town Council authorized staff to sign a letter of agreement with the Hometown Hockey event organizers that will see the outdoor festival visit Downtown Oakville during a weekend in December. The date will be confirmed once the NHL schedule is released in June.

Rogers Hometown Hockey is a two-day festival that celebrates Canada’s passion for hockey with a weekend of free outdoor activities. The festival will feature games, interactive experiences, and live entertainment for the whole family culminating with an outdoor viewing party of an NHL game broadcast live from the Sportsnet Mobile Studio with Ron MacLean and co-host Tara Slone.

“This event is a fantastic opportunity to celebrate hockey in Oakville, attract thousands of people downtown during the Christmas shopping season, and showcase our town to a national audience,” said Mayor Rob Burton.

Council also approved $96,000 in funding to cover costs associated with hosting the event such as marketing, parking, police, site security and a transit shuttle service.

Staff is working with the Hometown Hockey production team to confirm which area in downtown Oakville is most suitable for the event site. The event dates and location will be announced later this summer.


Sign up for the town’s RSS feeds

to get information delivered right to your desktop.

Read more – 

Council endorses Rogers Hometown Hockey event in downtown Oakville

Council recognizes four significant cultural heritage landscapes in Oakville

Wednesday, May 17, 2017 – for immediate release

Council recognizes four significant cultural heritage landscapes in Oakville

$150,000 additional funding approved to undertake Phase Three: Implementation of Protection Measures

Council recognized four Oakville properties as significant cultural heritage landscapes at its Planning and Development Council meeting Monday night. The four properties are:

Raydor Estate/Glen Abbey at 1333 Dorval Drive
Bowbeer Farmstead at 1086 Burnamthorpe Road East
Hilton Farm at 2013 North Service Road West
Biggar Farm at 4243 Sixth Line

The four properties will now be subject to Phase Three implementation work led by town staff to identify and recommend to Council potential measures to safeguard the heritage attributes of these properties.

Council’s decision took into account advice from town heritage staff, detailed information, analysis and opinions provided by external experts led by Letourneau Heritage Consulting, as well as input from landowners, the Heritage Oakville Advisory Committee and the public.

“The expert assessments and the staff report were very convincing in identifying how the four properties met the criteria to be recognized as significant cultural heritage landscapes,” Mayor Burton said. “We look forward to hearing back from staff, the public and the landowners on how we can best protect the heritage importance of these properties moving forward.”

Council’s decision continues the implementation of the town’s Cultural Heritage Landscapes Strategy, endorsed by Council in January 2014. These four properties were identified as high priority sites for further study in the Phase One Cultural Heritage Landscape Inventory endorsed by Council in February 2016. Last night’s actions concluded Phase Two Cultural Heritage Landscape Assessments for these properties. Council approved $150,000 in additional funding for Phase Three, which will include assistance from independent experts. 1333 Dorval Drive (Glen Abbey Golf Course/RayDor Estate) remains a high priority for completion.

Council also approved a staff recommendation that no further action be taken as part of the Cultural Heritage Landscape Strategy on two other properties that had been identified as high priority sites in the Phase One Inventory, Rivaz Farm at 3367 Dundas Street West and the Van Sickle Farm at 3451 Tremaine Road. These properties, while not identified as significant cultural heritage landscapes, were identified to have significant built heritage resources that may warrant protection. Two other high priority properties which are owned by the town, Bronte Harbour (3014 Lakeshore Road West) and Bronte Bluffs (35 West River Street) will be subject to Phase Two assessments in the coming months.

A cultural heritage landscape is a geographical area of heritage significance that has been modified by human activities and is valued by a community for the important contribution they make to our understanding of the history of a place, an event, or a people. The Provincial Policy Statement requires that significant cultural heritage landscapes be conserved.

For more information visit our Cultural Heritage Landscapes strategy page.


Sign up for the town’s RSS feeds

to get information delivered right to your desktop.

Visit source: 

Council recognizes four significant cultural heritage landscapes in Oakville

OMB upholds Town’s Interim Control By-law regarding Glen Abbey

Thursday, May 11, 2017 – for immediate release

OMB upholds Town’s Interim Control By-law regarding Glen Abbey

The Ontario Municipal Board has rejected ClubLink’s appeal by upholding the town’s Interim Control By-law (ICBL) and its one year extension, concluding that the ICBL was appropriate and necessary. The Board’s decision noted that the town’s ICBL was based on a legitimate planning rationale, was enacted in good faith, and was in conformity with the Region of Halton Official Plan and the Provincial Growth Plan.

“Council is very pleased that the Board recognized that the magnitude of the Glen Abbey proposal and its potential for impact on the community warrant further study,” Mayor Burton said. “Our Livable Oakville Official Plan specifically identifies suitable growth areas in order to protect the character of our stable residential neighbourhoods and Council looks forward to hearing the results of the town’s studies.”

The OMB’s decision ensures the town will have sufficient time to complete its studies on the Glen Abbey property. Staff will be reporting to Council over the next month on all three studies. Any further work directed by Council as a result of the studies is expected to be completed before the ICBL expires on February 1, 2018.

Upcoming meeting dates are:

  1. Urban Structure Review

Livable Oakville Subcommittee, Town Hall, May 15, 1 p.m.
Public information meetings, Town Hall, May 30, 1:30 to 3:30 and 6:30 to 8:30 p.m.
Planning and Development Council, Town Hall, June 12, 7 p.m.

  1. Cultural Heritage Landscapes

Phase 2 reports for the high priority sites, including Glen Abbey, went to Heritage Oakville Advisory Committee on April 25
Planning and Development Council, Town Hall, May 15, 7p.m.

  1. Land Use Economic and Impact Analysis

Planning and Development Council, Town Hall, June 12, 7 p.m.

Members of the public are invited to attend these upcoming meetings. To register as a delegate to speak at the Planning and Development Council meetings, please call 905-815-6015 or email townclerk@oakville.ca by noon the day of the meeting.

The ICBL, originally passed on February 1, 2016 with a one-year extension, will now remain in effect up to January 31, 2018. Section 38 of the Planning Act (Ont.) permits a municipality to pass an ICBL for up to a year (with the right to extend the by-law for a further year) in order to complete a review or study of land use policies in the municipality.

For more information, review the summary of the decision on the Interim Control By-law page.


Sign up for the town’s RSS feeds

to get information delivered right to your desktop.

From:  

OMB upholds Town’s Interim Control By-law regarding Glen Abbey

Town launches Switching Gears Transportation Master Plan Update

Tuesday, May 9, 2017 – for immediate release

Town launches Switching Gears Transportation Master Plan Update

Seeking public feedback on ensuring balanced and sustainable transportation options

As part of the scheduled update of its Switching Gears Transportation Master Plan (TMP), the Town of Oakville is seeking input from residents to help identify community transportation priorities from now until 2031.

“Our goal is to offer balanced, sustainable transportation options that make it even easier for people, goods, and services to move around Oakville,” said Mayor Rob Burton. “Switching Gears offers exceptionally detailed integration between Oakville’s land use and transportation planning. Now, we’re looking for public input to make sure we are focused on the community’s transportation priorities.”

Over the next few decades, the town expects to see increased traffic due to population and employment growth. That’s why the town is looking for responsible and effective ways to handle this growing demand by finding a balance for strategic road improvements with the need for greater range of transportation choices to reduce the number of vehicles on the road.

Building on the success of the town’s recent Active Transportation Master Plan update, Goods Movement Study and Pedestrian Safety Study, the 2017 TMP update will review the transportation network improvements focusing on future transit targets to accommodate growth to 2031, and provide input into the town’s upcoming Development Charge By-Law.

Public open house

To connect with residents, the town will be hosting a public open house on May 17 at Town Hall from 6 – 8 p.m. Drop-in and registration starts at 6 p.m. followed by a staff presentation and open house from 6:30 to 8 p.m.

Residents are also encouraged to submit comments and suggestions at tmp@oakville.ca or share their ideas on Facebook or Twitter.

Oakville’s TMP, Switching Gears (pdf) looks at all modes of transportation including public transit, walking, cycling and ride-sharing along with strategic roadway improvements to ensure the safe, convenient and efficient movement of people and goods. Launched in 2013, Switching Gears is the town’s guiding document for developing practical, sustainable, long-term plans to guide the town’s transportation system to meet the needs of its anticipated growth to 2031. It incorporates transportation, land use planning and financial strategy which respects the social, environmental and economic goals as defined in the Livable Oakville Plan, Halton’s Official Plan and Transportation Plan, and other provincial strategies.


Sign up for the town’s RSS feeds

to get information delivered right to your desktop.

Source:

Town launches Switching Gears Transportation Master Plan Update

Council moves Former Hospital Site Project into the next phase

Community Workshop on land use options scheduled for June 1

At a Special Meeting on Tuesday night concerning the redevelopment of the former Oakville-Trafalgar Memorial Hospital lands, Council approved the five-year review of the Parks, Recreation, Libraries Facilities Master Plan (Master Plan) and directed staff to report back on a parks and open space strategy to address issues and opportunities for future park acquisition. Council also received three staff reports on the former hospital site project including a financial overview, information on the new Southeast Oakville Community Centre, and proposed options for the overall site master plan.

Council gave staff the green light to seek public feedback on three land use options for the site. Staff will report back to Council on the results of the community consultation process at the June 27 Special Meeting of Council. Council also referred a final decision on the community centre’s base funding and program enhancements to the June 27 meeting and requested staff to report back on potential sponsorship opportunities for the centre.

“Oakville is one step closer to adding yet another community centre and even more parkland with the redevelopment of the former hospital site,” said Mayor Rob Burton. “Now, we’re looking for input from residents as we decide how best to arrange the parking garage, community centre, park and residential development on these lands.”

Residents from across Oakville are invited to share their feedback on the proposed land use concepts for the overall site at a June 1 community workshop. In the meantime, residents can also email their feedback to formerhospitalsite@oakville.ca. An online discussion forum will be coming out later in May.

While all three land use concepts include the community centre, a park and residential development, the arrangement is slightly different in each options. The concepts also adhere to a number of key principles derived from earlier public feedback and the town’s Official Plan such as placing the new community centre close to a park and the existing parking garage; incorporating a “green connection” for pedestrian access through the site; conserving heritage aspects of the former Oakville-Trafalgar High School (OTHS); protecting the Chimney Swift colony; as well as ensuring new development is compatible with the neighbouring community and consistent with the Livable Oakville Plan policies.

Council also heard from staff about several potential community centre enhancements that were identified during public consultation. The most frequently requested items and their potential costs include: expansion of the single gym to a double gym ($450,000); therapeutic warm-water pool ($2,340,000); fitness centre ($2,460,000) and; an indoor walking track ($1,800,000). These features are in addition to the amenities already planned for the community centre: indoor pool (to replace Centennial Pool), multi-purpose rooms and space for intergenerational programming. Council referred the decision on the base funding and the optional program enhancements to the June 27 Special Meeting of Council.

While not recommended in the Master Plan, members of the Oakville Aquatics Club spoke at the meeting requesting a 50 meter pool for the community centre. Town Council asked they return to Council with financing associated with their request as well as fundraising potential.

Background

The former site of the Oakville-Trafalgar Memorial Hospital (OTMH) was part of the town’s overall 2013 South Central Public Lands Study (SCPLS) which reviewed a number of key sites owned by the town in south central Oakville (e.g. surplus school sites, Oakville Arena) and made recommendations about their future use, including recreation uses. The town is working with community partners to create a vibrant new community centre, park, and future residential areas site to meet the needs of Oakville residents.

This summer contractors will begin site preparation for the safe demolition of the former hospital and Helen Lawson buildings. The overall demolition and site remediation will take approximately 12 months to complete. Development of the new community centre will begin in late 2018 with an opening scheduled for fall 2020.

For more information and to sign up for email updates from the town, please visit our Former Hospital Site Project page.


Sign up for the town’s RSS feeds

to get information delivered right to your desktop.

See the original article here: 

Council moves Former Hospital Site Project into the next phase

Town Council approves new private tree protection by-law

Tuesday, May 2, 2017 – for immediate release

Town achieves highest standard in performance data collection

ISO 37120 Platinum certification reflects commitment to transparency and innovation

Oakville joins the ranks of cities across the globe after receiving the prestigious ISO 37120 platinum certification, the world’s first international standard for sustainable cities, from the World Council on City Data (WCCD). Oakville is the fourth Ontario municipality to receive this designation, and is the first International Organization of Standardization (ISO) achievement for the town.

“This certification is a significant achievement for Oakville that reflects Council’s commitment to innovation and transparency as we work to create Canada’s most livable town,” Mayor Rob Burton said. “Our involvement with the WCCD will help us measure how well we’re meeting the needs of our citizens, track our progress over time and benchmark our performance against other world-class cities.”

ISO 37120 Sustainable Development of Communities: Indicators for City Services and Quality of Life is comprised of 100 performance indicators that track a city’s progress in delivering services and ensuring quality of life for its community. Platinum certification acknowledges that the town has achieved the highest standard in data collection and research to drive the delivery of high quality programs and services to the community.

As a global leader on standardized metrics, the WCCD manages the ISO 37120 certification system and Global Cities Registry that hosts data from approximately 40 cities around the world, to enable a municipality and its residents to compare its social, economic and environmental performance in relation to other cities. Data now available shows that Oakville is leading the way in areas including the number of higher education degrees per 100,000 population (about one in two citizens has a higher education degree), total electrical energy use per capita (Oakville is one of the most efficient communities) and total number of bike paths/lanes per 100,000 population (among the highest of cities worldwide).

There is a wide range of certification levels offered by the WCCD for cities to aspire to and levels are based on the number of indicators reported by the city. To achieve platinum certification, the highest level, the town provided data on over 90 indicators that was validated through a third-party verification process.

During her presentation to Council, Dr. Patricia McCarney, president and CEO of World Council on City Data, commended the town’s commitment open data and efforts to pursue certification. “It is my pleasure to welcome the Town of Oakville to the World Council on City Data as an ISO 37120 platinum certified municipality. The dedication of Mayor Burton, Town Council and staff to open, standardized and comparable city data will help to increase the quality of life for all citizens while driving evidence-based decision making and data driven solutions. The town stands out in Canada and globally as a leader in working to create a more smart, sustainable, resilient, inclusive and prosperous future for its residents.”

Quick Facts

The WCCD was founded in 2014 – ISO 37120 was piloted by 20 WCCD Foundation Cities throughout the world
Based on eight years of development by the Global City Indicators Facility and later the Global Cities Institute at the University of Toronto
ISO 37120 is the first ISO standard on cities
Comprises 100 indicators (54 core, 46 supporting) around 17 themes on city sustainability and quality of life

To view Oakville’s data and to learn more about ISO 37120, visit the World Council on City Data website. To learn more about the town’s commitment to open data, visit our Open Data page..


Sign up for the town’s RSS feeds

to get information delivered right to your desktop.

More here – 

Town Council approves new private tree protection by-law