Hats Off to Tourism Volunteers

April 7 – 13, 2019 is National Volunteer Week, so it is the perfect time…

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Hats Off to Tourism Volunteers

National Volunteer Week 2018

April 15 – 21, 2018 is National Volunteer Week, so it is the perfect time to…

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National Volunteer Week 2018

Town prepares for reconstruction of Lakeshore Road Bridge at Sixteen Mile Creek

Wednesday, January 18, 2017 – for immediate release

Town prepares for reconstruction of Lakeshore Road Bridge at Sixteen Mile Creek

Bridge closes the week of January 30; reopens December 2017

During the week of January 30, 2017, the Lakeshore Road Bridge over Sixteen Mile Creek will be closed until December 2017 to motorists, cyclists and pedestrians in both directions. The bridge is being reconstructed as part of the overall Lakeshore Road Reconstruction and Streetscape project.

A detour route around the bridge will be provided via Kerr Street, Rebecca Street and Navy Street. All businesses, the library, the theatre and Centennial Pool remain open and accessible during construction.

“The town is moving forward with a much needed project to reconstruct Lakeshore Road East starting with the bridge. Changing the streetscape in downtown Oakville will help pave the way for a revitalized downtown,” said Mayor Rob Burton. “We appreciate everyone’s patience during construction and remind you that it is business as usual in downtown Oakville.”

Once complete, the new bridge will include two travel lanes and bikes lanes. There will also be a wider pedestrian sidewalk with a barrier wall to separate the sidewalk and vehicular traffic. New pedestrian railings and lookouts will be included as well as LED lighting. The Lakeshore Road approaches to the bridge between Navy Street and Forsythe Street will also be reconstructed.

On January 5, 2017, in preparation for the bridge closure, Navy Street was permanently converted to two-way traffic between Lakeshore and Rebecca/Randall streets. Signs are posted around the area to notify drivers of the change. As part of the Council approved Downtown Transportation and Streetscape Study (DTS), Navy Street is one of several streets in downtown Oakville scheduled to be converted to two-way operation. The other streets are still in the detailed design phase and are scheduled to be converted in 2018.

Another addition to Downtown Oakville is the new pedestrian crossover device at the intersection of Navy Street and Church Street (in front of Centennial Square). Several new crossovers are planned to be installed across town in 2017 starting with the Navy and Church street location. Pedestrian crossovers have specific pavement markings and crossing signs. There are three types of crossovers. The crossover at Navy and Church has poles, flashing beacons above the signs and pedestrian push buttons. Unlike pedestrian crosswalks at traffic signal locations, at a crossover, drivers and cyclists must stop behind the yield line and wait until the pedestrian completely crosses the road before proceeding.

With Lakeshore Road East (Navy Street to Allan Street) coming to the end of its lifespan and needing a major reconstruction, the town undertook extensive research and public consultation to identify broader opportunities to improve traffic, beautify streets and improve pedestrian/cycle ways in the downtown. In October 2015, Council approved the Lakeshore Road Reconstruction and Streetscape Project as part of the Downtown Transportation and Streetscape Study (DTS) study. The Lakeshore Bridge at Sixteen Mile Creek reconstruction is taking place in advance of the road project as inspections of the bridge revealed its condition warrants immediate attention.

For details about this project, please visit the Lakeshore Road Bridge Reconstruction page. Additional information will be posted online as the projects progress. You can also contact ServiceOakville at 905-845-6601.


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Town prepares for reconstruction of Lakeshore Road Bridge at Sixteen Mile Creek

Town to recommence public consultation on furniture options for downtown Oakville

Tuesday, July 26, 2016 – for immediate release

Town to recommence public consultation on furniture options for downtown Oakville

Be sure to have your say this fall

Town Council passed a motion on July 25, 2016, directing staff to recommence a public engagement process this fall with traditional, classical and contemporary furniture options — streetlights, benches, bike rings and bollards — for the Lakeshore Road East Reconstruction and Streetscape Project. The motion also called on staff to develop options for Lakeshore Road that would provide, in whole or in part, a flexible (curbless) street. Staff are expected to report back on both items in early 2017. In the meantime, staff will move forward with incorporating the garbage/recycling stations as well as the granite pavers and curbs into the streetscape design as presented to the public this past March and June.

“Engaging with the public is always vital. In this case, Council believes the streetscape design will be a key factor in the success of downtown Oakville as a social, cultural and economic hub” said Mayor Burton. “That’s why we’ve asked staff to seek additional public input on this issue before we come to a decision.”

Following extensive public consultation through the Downtown Transportation and Streetscape Study (DTS) a contemporary theme was chosen in 2015, over traditional and classical, to complement the historic buildings in the streetscape yet remain a reflection of the current time. However, when specific contemporary furniture pieces were presented to the public this past March and June there was significant concern and opposition about the theme choice. Desire to maximize a flexible (curbless) design of the Lakeshore Road East configuration was also discussed at these meetings as a topic for consideration.

Once finalized, the new streetscape materials and furnishing are expected to be used as part of the Lakeshore Road Reconstruction and Streetscape Project slated to start in 2019, and for other streets in downtown Oakville as they are reconstructed in the future. The new curbs and pavers will be included when the town undertakes to rehabilitate the Lakeshore Road Bridge at Sixteen Mile Creek starting in early 2017, including the roadway approaches between Navy Street and Forsythe Street.

Background

The Downtown Oakville Heritage Conservation District (DOHCD) Plan identified the current mixture of designs, materials and colours in downtown as visually cluttered. The DOHCD Plan identified the opportunity for a new design of streets furnishing, allowing for contemporary improvements, so long as it is cohesive, supports the pedestrian environment and does not compete with the historic material of the district.

With Lakeshore Road East (Navy Street to Allan Street) coming to the end of its lifespan and needing a major reconstruction, the town undertook extensive research and public consultation to identify broader opportunities to improve traffic, beautify streets and improve pedestrian/cycle ways in the downtown. In October 2015, Council approved the Lakeshore Road Reconstruction and Streetscape Project as part of the Downtown Transportation and Streetscape Study (DTS) study.

For more information visit the Lakeshore Road Reconstruction Project page.


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Town to recommence public consultation on furniture options for downtown Oakville

Councillor Adams appointed chair of 2017 Budget Committee

Wednesday, June 29, 2016 – for immediate release

Councillor Adams appointed chair of 2017 Budget Committee

At the inaugural 2017 Budget Committee meeting on June 27, 2016, Councillor Tom Adams was appointed for a ninth consecutive year as Oakville’s budget chair. Councillor Adams holds his Master’s in Business Administration from McMaster University and is a former senior risk manager to one of Canada’s major financial institutions.

Oakville is committed to offering valued services and programs to residents and making strategic investments in community priorities. Each year the town’s annual budget is one of the most important tasks facing Town Council, and Council has directed staff to prepare a budget that keeps the overall tax increase in line with inflation.

“Keeping our finances stable, secure, and healthy is a key part of our vision to make Oakville the most livable town in Canada,” Mayor Rob Burton said. “Councillor Adams has a fantastic track record as budget chair and I am confident that his experience will help us once again meet our goal of keeping tax increases in line with inflation.”

As its first order of business, the Budget Committee received details of the 2017 process, which includes four meetings scheduled for November to provide an overview of the budget, staff presentations, and to receive delegations from the public and key stakeholders. The final staff recommended budget will be presented to Council on November 15, 2016, with Budget Committee recommendations finalized on December 6, 2016. Council approval of the operating and capital budgets is set for December 12, 2016.

“Public input is a critical piece of our annual budget process and I look forward to engaging with residents over the next few months,” Councillor Adams said. “Our key focus for this budget is to meet our goal of keeping overall property tax increases in line with inflation, while building and renewing infrastructure and maintaining high quality services for the community.”

For more information, access the staff report included in the June 27, 2016 Budget Committee meeting agenda or visit the 2017 Budget page.


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Town seeks feedback on final materials and furniture for downtown Oakville

Public input open until June 30, 2016

The town’s much needed project to reconstruct Lakeshore Road in downtown Oakville is now in the last stage of the furniture and materials selection process. Public meetings were held at Town Hall on June 15, 2016, where residents and businesses had a chance to view the final contemporary pieces, share their thoughts, and learn more about the Lakeshore Road Reconstruction and Streetscape Project.

“Understanding the priorities of residents and business owners is a critical part of ensuring Oakville’s downtown remains attractive, vibrant and economically stable,” said Mayor Rob Burton. “Council truly appreciates the feedback we receive and looks forward to revitalizing the downtown with a newly redesigned Lakeshore Road.”

The new streetscape materials and furnishing include granite pavers and curbs, benches, bike rings, roadside bollards, trash/recycling stations and streetlights that will be used as part of the Lakeshore Road Reconstruction and Streetscape Project slated to start in 2019, and for other streets in downtown Oakville as they are reconstructed in the future. Some of the streetscape features will also be included when the town undertakes to rehabilitate the Lakeshore Road Bridge at Sixteen Mile Creek starting in early 2017.

Public opinion was mixed on some of the specific furniture pieces (benches, bike racks and streetlight poles). Some residents were concerned that the furniture might clash with the downtown’s heritage elements. The contemporary theme for downtown Oakville was chosen over traditional and modern options in 2015 after extensive public consultation through the Downtown Transportation and Streetscape Study (DTS) . A presentation was also made to the Oakville Heritage Committee highlighting the complimentary role of a contemporary streetscape theme to the heritage elements of downtown Oakville.

Members of the community who couldn’t make it out on Wednesday can review photos of the final materials and furniture online and provide comments by email until June 30. Later this summer, staff are planning to present the final selections to the Oakville Heritage Committee and the Accessibility Advisory Committee before going to Council in early fall 2016.

Moving forward, the town will be having conversations on how to minimize any construction impact on downtown businesses, residents and visitors.

With Lakeshore Road East (Navy Street to Allan Street) approaching the end of its lifespan and needing a major reconstruction, the town undertook extensive research and public consultation to identify broader opportunities to improve traffic, beautify streets and improve pedestrian/cycle ways in the downtown. In October 2015, Council approved the Lakeshore Road Reconstruction and Streetscape Project as part of the DTS which included a contemporary theme for the downtown streetscape design.

The DTS, along with the Downtown Culture Hub Study (DCH), make up the town’s exciting Downtown Plan which aims to create an attractive, active, animated and vibrant downtown that will bring people together while maintaining the beautiful historic downtown streetscape. The DCH is exploring opportunities to create cultural and performing arts spaces and new riverfront park that will become the cultural, social, and economic heart of our community. Staff is undertaking further research and public consultation on these potential DCH opportunities before reporting back to Council later this year.

For more information and to review an online photo library of the final suite of furniture and materials, visit the Lakeshore Road Reconstruction Project page.


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Town seeks feedback on final materials and furniture for downtown Oakville

Town highlights accessibility during National Access Awareness Week

Tuesday, May 31, 2016 – for immediate release

Town highlights accessibility during National Access Awareness Week

The Town of Oakville is committed to accessibility and inclusion for residents of all abilities. In celebration of this commitment, Mayor Rob Burton proclaimed May 29 to June 4 National Access Awareness Week in Oakville.

“As a town, it is our job to remove barriers preventing everyone from fully participating in the community,” Mayor Rob Burton said. “Offering accessible programs, services and facilities is an essential part of making Oakville the most livable town in Canada.”

National Access Awareness Week is dedicated to encouraging Canadians to think about the barriers people with disabilities face, and to find ways to help remove them. Highlights of the town’s commitment to promoting inclusion and reducing barriers include:

Development of the New Oakville Universal Design Standards for town facilities, mandatory for all construction projects at the town. The standard is recognized by the province as best-practice in barrier-free design and has been adopted by a number of municipalities in Ontario.
Enhancements to town facilities include power door openers, accessible washrooms, accessible parking spots, cane detectable warning surfaces, accessible counters at service desks, accessible front lobby seating, and new directional signage at Town Hall. Town community centres offer accessible showers and change areas and arenas feature accessible viewing areas and barrier-free paths.
All Oakville Transit buses feature low-floors to better support patrons with mobility issues and offer visual and verbal announcements of direction, destination, and next major stop.
Specialized recreation programs for persons with disabilities are offered in various facilities such as yoga “younique”, clay classes and summer camp one-on-one support programs.
New and redeveloped playgrounds include accessible play equipment, accessible washrooms (where available), and clear space to allow children, caregivers and those using mobility devices to play and move freely.
Audit of the town’s existing 255 kilometres of trail facilities will be completed in 2016 to develop a strategy for accessibility improvements.
Online accessibility improvements include website upgrades, development of mobile apps for Oakville and Oakville Transit, and moving all video content to YouTube.
The town’s full-time Accessibility Coordinator promotes accessibility and provides advice to departments on how to remove and prevent barriers.

The town’s Accessibility Advisory Committee is committed to improving and promoting accessibility, and takes part in local events such as the Halton Community Resource Fair, Pan Am torch relay event and Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act (AODA) 10th anniversary to support awareness and collaboration.

Visit the accessibility page to learn more about the town’s multi-year accessibility plan and ongoing work to make it easier for people of all abilities to participate in the community.


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Art meets fashion at Oakville Museum’s new exhibition opening May 27, 2016

Thursday, May 26, 2016 – for immediate release

Art meets fashion at Oakville Museum’s new exhibition opening May 27, 2016

What do Pierre Trudeau, Elizabeth Taylor and The Beatles have in common? They are all featured in Oakville’s newest Art and Fashion exhibition that will take visitors on a 250-year journey through the world of paintings and couture.

“This exhibit explores the relationship between fashion and the art of its time and we’re very excited to showcase nine of our most exquisite gowns paired with nine unique artistic movements,” said Carolyn Cross, Curator of Collections at Oakville Museum.

The exhibit begins with a 1766 French court style gown featuring lace, silk and embroidery paired with the Rococo art that reflects the desire for luxury and excess which came to a halt with the French Revolution.

From there the exhibit proceeds to cover most of the major art movements of the 19th and 20th centuries including the Impressionists and Expressionists before reaching a Pop Art finale highlighting iconic artifacts from the 1960s. A Pierre Trudeau paper dress is displayed with a copy of Andy Warhol’s Silver Liz and the Sgt. Peppers Lonely Hearts Club Band album by The Beatles.

“In 1968, a journalist said that electing Pierre Trudeau was like voting for a Beatle because he was so popular so we had to put these pieces together,” Cross explained. “It really is a fun exhibit and you don’t have to be an art historian or a fashion devotee to enjoy it.”

The Art and Fashion exhibition runs from May 27, 2016 to June 18, 2017 at the Oakville Museum at Erchless Estate, 8 Navy Street, in downtown Oakville. The museum is open Tuesday to Sunday, from 1 to 4:30 p.m. and admission is free.

For more information, visit the Oakville Museum page.


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Art meets fashion at Oakville Museum’s new exhibition opening May 27, 2016

Ontario Budget 2016

Ontario’s Minister of Finance, Charles Sousa, presented the government’s 2016 Budget to the Legislature yesterday. The budget outlined the government’s plan to create jobs, grow the economy, invest in major infrastructure projects, low-carbon initiatives and programs to improve Ontario’s workforce. The Minister indicated that the government is on track to eliminate the deficit by 2017-18.

What does the 2016 Budget mean for Ontario REALTORS®?

Municipal Land Transfer Tax (MLTT): We are happy to report that Budget 2016 does not reverse the province’s commitment not to give municipalities MLTT powers. OREA continues to monitor for legislation that would give any new revenue tools to municipalities.

Personal Real Estate Corporations (PRECs): Unfortunately, the government did not include OREA’s pre-budget recommendation to permit the use of PRECs by real estate salespeople or brokers. OREA will continue to advocate for this proposal.

Cap-and-Trade Initiative: Ontario will move forward with a cap-and-trade system as its carbon pricing mechanism. The government estimates that the cap-and-trade plan will add about 4.3 cents a litre to the price of gasoline and about $5 a month to natural gas bills.

Ontario Home Energy Audits and Retrofits: The budget reconfirms the home energy audit and retrofit program introduced earlier this month. The program would invest $100 million from the Ontario Green Investment Fund to provide rebates for home owners with Enbridge or Union Gas to conduct an energy audit and retrofits recommended by the auditor. While OREA is supportive of the new program, we will continue to oppose any efforts to introduce mandatory home energy audits.

Ontario Retirement Pension Plan/Pooled Registered Pension Plan: The budget announces the government’s commitment to move forward with the ORPP. The government also reaffirmed that their long term objective is to enhance the CPP.

Changing Workplaces Review: OREA is currently involved in the Employment Standards Act, 2000 review, advocating to maintain the current exemption for real estate professionals. Budget 2016 announces that the Special Advisor’s leading the consultation will release their interim report by early 2016 and the full report in summer 2016.

Healthy Homes Renovation Tax Credit (HHRTC): Budget 2016 announced that the HHRTC will end on January 1st, 2017. The HHRTC was created to help seniors live independently in their homes by making renovations more affordable.

For more information on the Ontario Budget please visit the Ministry of Finance’s website.

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Ontario Budget 2016

Town to add 28 km of new pedestrian and cycling ways

Wednesday, February 3, 2016 – for immediate release

Town to add 28 km of new pedestrian and cycling ways

Town Council’s approval of the 2016 Active Transportation Capital Program at the February 1, 2016, Council meeting just made getting around Oakville on foot or by bike even easier.

“Council and I are proud to be adding 28 kilometres to the plan’s existing 185 kilometres of pedestrian and cycling paths in town,” Mayor Rob Burton said. “We are committed to providing residents and visitors with convenient and healthy alternatives to get around Oakville.”

By the end of 2016, implementation of over 28 kilometres of new cycling and pedestrian paths will have started for a number of different uses. Projects approved for 2016 include:

On-road cycle lanes
Along Bristol Circle around the entire length of Winston Park Boulevard; and along Winston Park Boulevard between Dundas Street and Bristol Circle.

Off-road multi-use trails
Along Cornwall Road between Chartwell Road and Morrison Road, and along both sides of Dundas Street between Neyagawa Boulevard and Oak Park Boulevard.

Sidewalks
Along Cornwall Road from Chartwell Road to Morrison Road, Wedgewood Drive from Constance Drive to Devon Road, Constance Drive from Wedgewood Drive to Maple Grove Drive, Trafalgar Road over the QEW overpass, and on Upper Middle Road at Ninth Line.

Signed bike routes
Along sections of Arrowhead Road, Devon Road, Hixon Street, Jones Street, Lees Lane, Linbrook Road, Pinegrove Road, Pinery Crescent, Rockingham Drive, Sandwell Drive, Sedgewick Crescent, Warminster Drive, Woodhaven Park Drive, Yolanda Drive, and Sunset Drive.

In addition, to encourage participation in cycling as an alternate mode of transportation the town will increase the number of bike racks/rings on the side streets in downtown Oakville and continue with its bike corral pilot project within the three BIAs. Town staff will also implement a number of public education and outreach projects such as updating the Cycle, Walk Oakville web-based and hard copy maps, and participating in the Active and Sustainable School Transportation program.

Finally, a major initiative for 2016 will be to continue the review and assessment of the entire existing active transportation network in order to develop a larger scale capital rehabilitation program to ensure our paths and trails remain in good condition. Completion of the multi-use trail rehabilitation along Rebecca Street from Third Line to Fourth Line, as well as a review and rehabilitation of the multi-use trail along the south side of Upper Middle Road from Third Line to the Smith Triller Viaduct will also continue this year.

Funding for the active transportation program comes from several sources including annual capital budget for new facilities, other capital budgets relating to road projects, sidewalk and multi-use trail budget, and capital maintenance budget for existing facilities.

The ATMP was introduced in 2009 and recommends an extensive network of facilities composed of on-road and off-road paths designed to respond to the needs of a range of active transportation users, age and skill level. Since then a total of 185 kilometres of bike lanes, pathways and signed bike routes were implemented as well as 110 bike racks across the town.

Later this year staff will be initiating the first update to the existing ATMP. Building on the success of the current plan, and the town’s approved transportation master plan, Switching Gears, staff will conduct an interactive public and technical agency engagement process to guide the update.

More information about upcoming active transportation projects for 2016 and completed/ongoing projects from 2015 can be found on the Active Transportation Capital Projects page.


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Town to add 28 km of new pedestrian and cycling ways