This Weekend in Burlington – June 17/18

The month of June has the longest daylight hours of the year. Take advantage of…

The post This Weekend in Burlington – June 17/18 appeared first on Tourism Burlington.

Link to article: 

This Weekend in Burlington – June 17/18

Town of Oakville recognized for 2015 Culture Days celebration

Monday, December 21, 2015 – for immediate release

Town of Oakville recognized for 2015 Culture Days celebration

Town places third among top 10 municipalities with similar population

Oakville’s celebration of arts and culture held on Saturday, September 26, 2015 was among the best Culture Days events in the country according to the annual Top Ten Cities and Towns list released by the Culture Days non-profit organization.

The town ranked third within the group with populations of 50,000 to 499,999. Richmond, BC took the top spot followed by London, ON in second place.

“On behalf of Council, I’d like to congratulate everyone involved in organizing such a successful and widely recognized event,” Mayor Rob Burton said. “Oakville Culture Days is a great opportunity for residents to immerse themselves and learn more about our vibrant arts and culture community.”

Rankings were based on the number of activities held in each community. Oakville’s Culture Days at Queen Elizabeth Park Community and Cultural Centre (QEPCCC) featured 62 activities, including theatre performances, ceramic and woodshop workshops, exhibitions and more.

Culture Days is a grassroots, nation-wide movement that aims to raise awareness, participation and engagement in the arts and cultural life of Canadian communities.


Sign up for the town’s RSS feeds

to get information delivered right to your desktop.

Jump to original: 

Town of Oakville recognized for 2015 Culture Days celebration

Miss Real Estate Manners: Protect your clients

These 10 tips about courtesy in real estate are taken from guidelines produced in the Miss Real Estate Manners document from the London and St. Thomas Association of REALTORS® (LSTAR). The following story in The REALTOR® EDGE newsletter is the sixth installment of tips, excerpted from the “Common sense” section of the guidelines, with permission from LSTAR.

1. When showing property keep all members of the group together.

2. Never allow unaccompanied persons access to property without permission. Enter property only with permission even if you have an Active Key or an EKey.

3. Update the seller frequently on market conditions (good or bad) on how the marketing is going and how prospective buyers are reacting to the home. Be gentle.

4. Make sure your advertising honestly reflects the property and is in good taste.

5. Ensure that the buyer and seller are aware of the closing costs (i.e., principal, interest, GST, insurance, Land Transfer Tax and any required mortgage insurance) as well as the payments. Remember that first-time buyers are often blissfully unaware that there is such a thing as closing costs. Enlighten them. Gently.


Read the December EDGE
Offer handling a common complaint: RECO
Multiple offers pose unique challenges


6. Direct all enquiries regarding terms, conditions or the price of a home to the listing REALTOR®. Do not discuss these points directly with the seller.

7. Be certain all co-operating brokers are aware of the compensation they will receive upon successful conclusion of the transaction before they show your listing. Avoid commission disputes in the presence of buyers or sellers. (Can you imagine how awkward that would be?  And how unprofessional?)

8. If you are the listing REALTOR®, present all offers in an unbiased manner, regardless of who wrote it – even if it’s your worst enemy. It’s not your choice to make.  It’s the seller’s choice.

9. Help the seller evaluate any fair and reasonable offer, but do not act against the best interest of your client, his or her own best judgment, or good conscience.

10. Make sure that the fully-signed purchase agreement reflects the terms and conditions to which the principals have agreed. Avoid ambiguity.

The above tips are excerpted with permission from the London and St. Thomas Association of REALTORS®. Read LSTAR’s full Miss Manners document here.

Link:  

Miss Real Estate Manners: Protect your clients

Miss Real Estate Manners – Part 4

This is the fourth installment of tips on courtesy in real estate, taken from guidelines produced by the London and St. Thomas Association of REALTORS® (LSTAR). The following article in the REALTOR® EDGE newsletter is excerpted from the “Common sense” section of the guidelines with permission from LSTAR.

Real estate is a reputation business. What you do today may affect your reputation and business for years to come. Bear this in mind: in professional life, where career and business depend on the way you deal with your peers and clients, courtesy is of paramount importance. Here are 10 tips that focus on common sense in real estate.

Identify yourself as a Realtor in all contacts with the public and other Realtors.

Urge your buyer to get pre-qualified. Showing homes that buyers cannot afford, or that do not meet their needs, is an exercise in futility for all parties, including yourself.

Learn the facts about a property before showing it. If you do not know something, say so. You may be legally responsible for misrepresentation of a property or facts. (Disclose, disclose, disclose!)

Share important information about a property, including the presence of pets, security systems and whether the sellers will be present during the showing.

Notify the listing brokerage if there appears to be inaccurate information on the listing or complete an Association DIS form.

Avoid the inappropriate use of endearments or other condescending language (e.g., no calling your colleague “Dearie” or the buyer “Luv”!)

Do not prospect at other Realtors’ open houses or similar events.

Exhibit honest, ethical behaviour when showing another brokerage’s listing.

Allow only registered persons to conduct showings on your behalf. Having an unregistered friend or spouse “cover” for you is in violation of the Real Estate and Business Brokers Act. If a complaint is made, you may be subject to discipline and very steep fines. It’s unprofessional and, frankly, it’s hardly worth it.

The above tips are excerpted with permission from the London and St. Thomas Association of REALTORS®. Read LSTAR’s full Miss Manners document here.

Link to original – 

Miss Real Estate Manners – Part 4

Miss Real Estate Manners: Show courtesy

The following excerpt is taken with permission from guidelines posted by the London and St. Thomas Association of REALTORS®.

In real estate, as in life, the Golden Rule applies: Treat others the way you would like to be treated. Real estate professionals should abide by the three Cs: Courtesy, Communication, andCommon Sense. Just ask yourself how you would like to be treated. Treat your colleagues, clients and customers that way. It’s not only nice; it’s smart. Good ethical standards can and do lead to more business, while behaving badly may have a very negative effect on your career. Remember: real estate is a reputation business. What you do today may affect your reputation and business for years to come.

The following points of etiquette may seem obvious to ridiculous and even insulting. What REALTOR® would trample on a client’s neighbour’s flowerbed? What ‘professional’ would show up on the doorstep of another agent’s listing without advance warning at nine o’clock at night and ask the seller to show him the house? Yet we’ve heard complaints from both REALTORS® and the public regarding every single one of these “no-no’s”.

Read it and weep, but most of all remember: in professional life, where career and business depends on the way you deal with your peers and clients, courtesy is of paramount importance. Here are some tips from the “Courtesy” section of the Miss Real Estate Manners document produced by the London and St. Thomas Association of REALTORS®.


Read the June EDGE
Why big data holds the key to better service
Motorcycle ride for charity celebrates 10th anniversary


Courtesy

When you page a fellow REALTOR®, please leave your full name and office. (“Hiya, Joey boy! Call Bob!” doesn’t cut it. Who the heck’s Bob?)
Promptly return phone calls. REALTORS® who don’t return calls (or answer e-mails) are not only rude, they are standing in the way of business getting done and damaging their reputation and career
If you say that you will call someone by a certain time, call!
Avoid making late-night phone calls about things that can wait until the morning. Some people go to bed earlier than you and don’t appreciate being woken up.
If it’s too late to call a client, it’s too late to call a colleague. REALTORS® sleep too. Respect and consideration for your fellow REALTORS® is worth more than making a phone call . . . or even a sale.
Do not make “urgent” phone calls or leave “urgent” messages unless the matter is really urgent. Remember the boy who cried, “Wolf!” one time too often.
If a seller you’ve had your eye on decides to list with somebody else, guess what? Respect and reinforce that decision! A professional attitude on your part will generate more business for you in the future than sniping about the competition in the here and now. The public doesn’t like negative advertising or attack strategies – not from politicians, not from REALTORS®. Take the high road.
And, speaking of your competition, don’t badmouth them. Speak respectfully about your competition and you will come across as professional; bash them and you come off sounding, well, like a thug.
Do you like people wasting your time? Of course not! So don’t waste theirs. Arrive on time or, if you are running late or have to cancel an appointment, politely advise the other party as soon as possible. (Remember: Do unto others…!)
Have you ever been stood up for a date? Remember how it felt? If you have an appointment to show a house and, when you arrive, your client refuses to look inside, you might be tempted to just drive off. Don’t. The owner might be sitting inside, waiting for you. The polite thing to do is to park the car, go up to the front door and make your apologies to the owner. He may not be happy, but at least he can get on with his life … and you will have done the decent thing. If the same thing happens and the owner is not at home, call and leave a message, letting him know that the house was not viewed.

The above tips are excerpted and reprinted with permission from the London and St. Thomas Association of REALTORS®. Read the full Miss Real Estate Manners document.

Continued here: 

Miss Real Estate Manners: Show courtesy

Everybody’s doin’ it, doin’ it, doin’ it!

Have you ever wanted and waited for something to happen and finally it did?

I’m talking about consolidation of MLS® in Ontario, where all REALTORS® will have seamless access to all MLS® information.

Yes, we’ve had some fine examples of information sharing and common MLS® data bases like in Toronto/GTA, Ottawa/Renfrew and London/Tillsonburg. But there were many regions where members had to join two or three boards to obtain all of the listing information for their market. It’s been costly, inefficient and in the eyes of the consumer, not very professional.

Things are rapidly changing! Several boards, that are with the MLS® vendor Millennium, are using Search-Integration software so their members can look seamlessly at all the listing information across three and even six separate real estate boards’ data bases. Each board remains independent.

In Southern Ontario, (Niagara to Oakville to Kitchener), eight separate real estate boards, currently dealing with five separate MLS® systems, will eventually consolidate into one common MLS® data base using the vendor Corelogix.  Again, each board remains independent.

This is fantastic news, and it’s in keeping with the 2014 theme of “collaboration” that’s permeating our strategic plans. We have to thank the Executive Officers and volunteer leaders who are leading this charge, putting in countless hours for the good of their members. (The Southern group had 30 meetings over 10 weeks!). Their courage and foresight is appreciated.

If you’re not doin’ it….you should be doin’ it.

Continue reading: 

Everybody’s doin’ it, doin’ it, doin’ it!

Second land transfer tax threatens Ontario jobs and economic activity

As Ontario gears up for municipal elections on October 27, OREA is highlighting what we feel is a major issue, the possibility of a second land transfer tax.

As municipalities across the province look for new revenue tools and taxes, one consideration has become a municipal land transfer tax (MLTT). This tax would be imposed on all home purchases, on top of the already existing provincial land transfer tax, raising the cost of homeownership.

In the spring we shared research about the loss of revenue and employment that an MLTT has caused the City of Toronto. Now it’s time to focus on what an MLLT could mean for other cities. New research conducted by Altus Group Economic Consulting, shows that an MLTT would greatly impact Ottawa, London, Mississauga, Hamilton and Thunder Bay. Dampening their economic activity and killing jobs.

According Altus’ report, Potential Economic Implications of the Municipal Land Transfer Tax in Selected Ontario Municipalities, the impact on some of our largest cities totals more than $1 billion and a loss of more than 10,000 jobs. It breaks down as follows:

Ottawa:                                                                      Mississauga:

Loss of $543 million in economic activity            Loss of $482 million in economic activity
Loss of 3,558 jobs                                                      Loss of 3,157 jobs
Loss of $184 million in wages and salaries          Loss of $163 million in wages and salaries

 

Hamilton:                                                                   London:

Loss of $342 million in economic activity              Loss of $270 million in economic activity
Loss of 2,240 jobs                                                        Loss of 1,771 jobs
Loss of $116 million in wages and salaries             Loss of $92 million in wages and salaries

 

Thunder Bay:

Loss of $60 million in economic activity
Loss of 392 jobs
Loss of $20 million in wages and salaries
For the full Altus report, and to find out how you can participate in the campaign, visit donttaxmydream.ca . Don’t forget to check out our campaign video and share it via social media.

Read the article:  

Second land transfer tax threatens Ontario jobs and economic activity

Celebrate our Olympians in downtown Oakville this Saturday, September 15

Tuesday, September 11, 2012 – for immediate release

Celebrate our Olympians in downtown Oakville this Saturday, September 15

Join in the excitement and meet your favourite athletes

It’s time to give Oakville’s 2012 Olympic heroes a standing ovation! Come out and join the celebration this Saturday, September 15 in downtown Oakville.

“What a great way to show your hometown pride for Oakville’s Olympic athletes,” Mayor Rob Burton said. “This is a big thank you to our athletes who showed a tremendous competitive spirit and were a true inspiration in every way at the London Games.”

The event kicks off at 2 p.m. with a parade along Lakeshore Road starting at Reynolds Street and ending with a reception and autograph session at Centennial Square.

Attending Olympians include Adam van Koeverden, Diana Matheson, Mark Oldershaw and Kyle Jones. Both Douglas Csima and Tera Van Beilen were unavailable to attend, but they will be represented by their parents at the event.

“As a community that is a passionate and proud supporter of recreational sports in Oakville, we hope this celebration will inspire all our athletes to reach for their dreams,” added Mayor Burton. “After all, the young athletes of today may be the Olympians of tomorrow.”

The parade will include temporary rolling road closures along Lakeshore Road. To accommodate “well-wishers” and to ease traffic congestion into the downtown core, Oakville Transit will be offering a free shuttle service from the Oakville GO Station to nearby Centennial Square. Shuttles leave the Oakville GO Station starting at 1 p.m. and depart from the celebration starting at 3:30 until 4:30 p.m. Accessible parking spaces will be available on Church Street.

Centennial Square is located at the corner of Lakeshore Road and Navy Street, in front of the Oakville Public Library and the Oakville Centre for the Performing Arts.

This celebration is proudly supported by our sponsors Ford Motor Company of Canada and Tim Hortons. A special thanks also goes to Budds Group of Car Dealerships, B&B Decals and Robert Boast-Cornish.

For full information about the event visit the celebrate our Olympians page. You can also follow the town on Twitter or like us on Facebook.

Media contact:

Michael Mendel
Senior Communications Advisor
Town of Oakville
905-845-6601, ext. 3788
mmendel@oakville.ca


Sign up for the town’s RSS feeds

to get information delivered right to your desktop.

See more here:

Celebrate our Olympians in downtown Oakville this Saturday, September 15

Oakville and partners win the Peter J. Marshall Innovation Award

The Town of Oakville, along with the Region of Waterloo, Region of York, and the cities of Brampton, Burlington, Hamilton and London, received the Peter J. Marshall Innovation Award at the Association of Municipalities of Ontario’s (AMO) annual conference in Ottawa. The award recognized the Transit Inventory Management Services (TIMS) project — an initiative that involved multiple transit agencies consolidating their parts procurement through a single North American supplier.

“Council would like to congratulate everyone involved in this project,” Mayor Rob Burton said. “This award not only recognizes the merits of the initiative in improving efficiencies, it also acknowledges the commitment of staff to think outside the box — wanting to create processes that benefit municipalities across boundaries.”

Kim Dooling, manager, Purchasing and Risk Management at the Town of Oakville, and Charles Whitlock, director, Procurement and Supply Services at the Region of Waterloo and Chair of the TIMS project, accepted the award on behalf of all the municipalities.

“It is a great honour to receive this prestigious award on behalf of the participating municipalities,” said Mr. Whitlock. “This project is a result of supply chain specialists and senior transit staff working together for two years to create a process that works.”

This Vendor Managed Inventory (VMI) model reduces administration costs, uses economies of scale to save participating municipalities money, increases efficiency, and reduces the supply chain’s carbon footprint. This new model allows for a more stable and streamlined supply chain, where fluctuations in inventory space and financing are absorbed by the supplier rather than the transit system.

The Peter J. Marshall Innovation Award recognizes municipal governments that have demonstrated excellence in the use of innovative approaches to improve capital and/or operating efficiency, and to generate effectiveness through alternative service delivery initiatives and partnerships.

About the winners

The City of Brampton’s transit system (Brampton Transit) has a fleet of 299 buses with two garages providing over 16 million passenger trips per year.

The City of Burlington’s transit system (Burlington Transit) has a fleet of 52 buses with one garage providing over 1.9 million passenger trips per year.

The City of Hamilton’s transit system (Hamilton Street Railway) has a fleet of 217 buses with one garage providing over 21.2 million passenger trips per year.

The City of London’s Transit Commission (London Transit Commission) has a fleet of 191 buses with two garages providing 22.4 million passenger trips per year.

The Region of Waterloo’s transit system (Grand River Transit) has a fleet of 218 buses with two garages, providing over 19 million passenger trips per year.

The Region of York’s transit system (York Region Transit) has a fleet of 437 buses with four garages providing over 21 million passenger trips per year.

The Town of Oakville’s transit system (Oakville Transit) has a fleet of 89 buses with one garage providing over 2.8 million passenger trips per year.

About AMO

AMO is a non-profit organization representing almost all of Ontario’s 444 municipal governments. AMO supports and enhances strong and effective municipal government in Ontario and promotes the value of municipal government as a vital and essential component of Ontario and Canada’s political system.

-30-

Media contact

Kim Dooling, CPPB
Manager, Purchasing and Risk Management
Town of Oakville
905-845-6601, ext.3087
kdooling@oakville.ca


Sign up for the town’s RSS feeds

to get information delivered right to your desktop.

Read article here – 

Oakville and partners win the Peter J. Marshall Innovation Award

Town of Oakville wins 11 awards for environmental, sustainability and social responsibility initiatives

Wednesday, June 20, 2012 – for immediate release

Town of Oakville wins 11 awards for environmental, sustainability and social responsibility initiatives

Oakville is one step closer to its goal of becoming the most livable town in Canada after bringing home an impressive 11 awards for various environmental, sustainability and social responsibility initiatives. Staff presented the awards received from community groups, industry peers and professional associations at Council Monday night.

“Council and I are thankful that town staff have won so much recognition for their hard work and dedication in creating a more sustainable Oakville,” Mayor Rob Burton said. “Council is proud of the quality and dedication of our town staff.”

Council congratulated staff on the following awards:

Conservation Halton Awards of Excellence – Corporate Award for leadership in biodiversity and environmental initiatives. Oakville was one of the first municipalities in Ontario to adopt an Environmental Strategic Plan (ESP)—a detailed plan that outlines the town’s commitment to protecting and enhancing the environment. The updated ESP approved by Council in December 2011, provided direction for a number of environmental programs. Oakville was recognized for its wildlife strategy, including the comprehensive Living with Coyotes education initiative. Other noteworthy highlights include a State of the Environment Reporting system that measures the plan’s results, efforts to deal with invasive species, as well as urban forestry initiatives to increase tree canopy cover and improve forest health.
Partners for Climate Protection ICLEI Award for Milestone 3 in recognition of Oakville’s Corporate and Community energy plans. The Corporate and Local Community energy plans outline necessary actions for the corporation and the community to improve Oakville’s air quality and reduce energy use. Since the program’s inception in 1994, 226 municipalities across Canada have joined the Partners for Climate Protection program. Of these members only 87 have achieved Milestone 3 or better.
LEED (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design) Gold certification, awarded by the Canada Green Building Council for Oakville’s state-of-the-art Sixteen Mile Sports Complex. The facility earned LEED credits for energy performance, storm water treatment and management, ozone protection, light pollution reduction, thermal control and comfort, indoor air quality and green housekeeping. Sixteen Mile Sports Complex is Oakville’s first municipal building to achieve LEED certification and the first quad pad arena in Canada to earn LEED Gold.
Smart Commute Gold Workplace, recognized by Halton Region and Metrolinx for Oakville’s successful participation in the region-wide Smart Commute Initiative. The program helps reduce the amount of single occupant vehicles on the road, reduces pollution entering the environment, and supports carpooling, cycling, walking, and public transit initiatives. The gold award was given to Oakville as an outstanding workplace that demonstrates innovation and documented success in encouraging town staff to choose more environmentally friendly ways to get to and from work.
Bronze Level Bicycle Friendly Communities Award from the Share the Road Cycling Coalition, an Ontario-based non-profit organization that promotes bicycling as a mode of transportation, recreation and fitness. Municipalities are judged in five categories of cycling initiatives often referred to as the Five “Es.” These are Engineering, Education, Encouragement, Enforcement, and Evaluation and Planning.
Canadian Public Relations Society Pinnacle Award (Hamilton Chapter); International Association of Business Communicators (IABC) Awards: IABC Ovation Award of Excellence (Toronto Chapter), IABC Ovation Award of Merit (Toronto Chapter), IABC Virtuoso Award of Excellence (London Chapter), IABC Virtuoso Award of Merit (London Chapter), and IABC Best of the Best Virtuoso Award (London Chapter) for the Oakville Canopy Club, an innovative community outreach program that encourages residents and businesses to save Oakville’s tree canopy from the threat of the Emerald Ash Borer.

Award winners recognized by Council include:

Nina de Vaal, Michael Brennan and Sarah Douglas-Murray, Recreation and Culture
Chris Mark and Janis Olbina, Parks and Open Space
Shelly Switzer and Saher Fazilat, Facilities and Construction Management
Cindy Toth, Donna Doyle and Suzanne Madder, Environmental Policy
Chris Clapham, Engineering and Construction
Janine Ivings, Jeff Smalley and Brett McNally, Strategy, Policy and Communications

-30-

Media contact:

Janine Ivings
Senior Communications Advisor
Strategy, Policy and Communications
905-845-6601, ext. 3005
jivings@oakville.ca


Sign up for the town’s RSS feeds

to get information delivered right to your desktop.

Original link – 

Town of Oakville wins 11 awards for environmental, sustainability and social responsibility initiatives