Town achieves highest standard in performance data collection

Tuesday, May 2, 2017 – for immediate release

Town achieves highest standard in performance data collection

ISO 37120 Platinum certification reflects commitment to transparency and innovation

Oakville joins the ranks of cities across the globe after receiving the prestigious ISO 37120 platinum certification, the world’s first international standard for sustainable cities, from the World Council on City Data (WCCD). Oakville is the fourth Ontario municipality to receive this designation, and is the first International Organization of Standardization (ISO) achievement for the town.

“This certification is a significant achievement for Oakville that reflects Council’s commitment to innovation and transparency as we work to create Canada’s most livable town,” Mayor Rob Burton said. “Our involvement with the WCCD will help us measure how well we’re meeting the needs of our citizens, track our progress over time and benchmark our performance against other world-class cities.”

ISO 37120 Sustainable Development of Communities: Indicators for City Services and Quality of Life is comprised of 100 performance indicators that track a city’s progress in delivering services and ensuring quality of life for its community. Platinum certification acknowledges that the town has achieved the highest standard in data collection and research to drive the delivery of high quality programs and services to the community.

As a global leader on standardized metrics, the WCCD manages the ISO 37120 certification system and Global Cities Registry that hosts data from approximately 40 cities around the world, to enable a municipality and its residents to compare its social, economic and environmental performance in relation to other cities. Data now available shows that Oakville is leading the way in areas including the number of higher education degrees per 100,000 population (about one in two citizens has a higher education degree), total electrical energy use per capita (Oakville is one of the most efficient communities) and total number of bike paths/lanes per 100,000 population (among the highest of cities worldwide).

There is a wide range of certification levels offered by the WCCD for cities to aspire to and levels are based on the number of indicators reported by the city. To achieve platinum certification, the highest level, the town provided data on over 90 indicators that was validated through a third-party verification process.

During her presentation to Council, Dr. Patricia McCarney, president and CEO of World Council on City Data, commended the town’s commitment open data and efforts to pursue certification. “It is my pleasure to welcome the Town of Oakville to the World Council on City Data as an ISO 37120 platinum certified municipality. The dedication of Mayor Burton, Town Council and staff to open, standardized and comparable city data will help to increase the quality of life for all citizens while driving evidence-based decision making and data driven solutions. The town stands out in Canada and globally as a leader in working to create a more smart, sustainable, resilient, inclusive and prosperous future for its residents.”

Quick Facts

The WCCD was founded in 2014 – ISO 37120 was piloted by 20 WCCD Foundation Cities throughout the world
Based on eight years of development by the Global City Indicators Facility and later the Global Cities Institute at the University of Toronto
ISO 37120 is the first ISO standard on cities
Comprises 100 indicators (54 core, 46 supporting) around 17 themes on city sustainability and quality of life

To view Oakville’s data and to learn more about ISO 37120, visit the World Council on City Data website. To learn more about the town’s commitment to open data, visit our Open Data page..


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Town achieves highest standard in performance data collection

Let’s negotiate: Ability to reach agreement vital

 

If you lack negotiation skills, you won’t be able to put together a deal for your clients or keep your business afloat. Negotiating skills are crucial in real estate and, luckily, they can be learned on the job and improved throughout your career.

The REALTOR® Edge newsletter spoke with two Ontario REALTORS® and a negotiating expert to gain insights into how to succeed in negotiations.

Sharon Shortt of Belleville sold more than 1,000 homes during her 25-year sales career. Now a broker of record, she says she understood that her role in the negotiation process was that of a mediator between buyers and sellers.

“Although I am representing my client, if a deal can be negotiated that leaves both the buyer and the seller happy with the result, then we have a successful transaction, and ultimately everyone wins,” says Shortt.

“As REALTORS® we strive to serve the best interests of our clients, but it’s rare for both sides to get every single thing they originally wanted in a real estate transaction. All of us want to serve our clients, but the overall goal is for both buyer and seller to be happy with the result in the end.”

“The goal was for both buyer and seller to be happy with the result, even if they didn’t end up with every term that they originally wanted,” says Shortt.

There is usually something that needs to be negotiated from an original offer, Shortt notes, whether it is the closing date, price change, chattels such as appliances, or numerous other items. Sentimental items can also be a sticking point in negotiations, such as a tree planted by owners when their daughter was born that they wish to take with them. She has seen offers go back and forth as many as eight times, which isn’t that uncommon, she says.

“The challenging points are always the situations you least expect,” she adds. “Sometimes you can work them out, and sometimes you can’t.”

Negotiations can be very difficult, says Shortt, but she considered the challenge as “the very nature of the business — every Realtor has experience with negotiating.”


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When the words “tough negotiations” came up in conversation, she thinks back to the pricing negotiations she undertook a number of years ago for a chain of sales where the last buyer made an offer conditional upon the sale of his home, and the offer was accepted. “Unfortunately, as time passed, it became apparent that this buyer wasn’t going to be offered the price he needed for his own property to buy the other. We had to go back and renegotiate the sale price on each of the three properties involved in the chain,” says Shortt. “It was a lot of work to get everyone to agree, but in the end, the transactions all closed successfully.”

Chattels can be a huge stumbling block in the negotiating process, says Michael Gibbons, a Chatham Realtor who turned to real estate six years ago after a 20-year career in retail. He recalls a transaction when ownership of the washer and dryer was a heated point of dispute among the two parties. The laundry room had been custom built with a unique setup and the appliances fit perfectly.

“The washer and dryer were taken out and put back into the offer about four times,” Gibbons says. “It was a big sticking point and both sides were really hung up about it. The fate of these appliances probably added three extra days to the negotiations.”

A creative solution was eventually proposed by Gibbons: he offered to give the buyers his own washer and dryer, which were the same size and would also fit the space perfectly. “From a real estate perspective, it worked out well, but my wife wasn’t happy,” laughs Gibbons. “Sometimes in the heat of negotiations, you have to make quick decisions. In retrospect, I probably should have discussed the idea with my wife beforehand, but fortunately everything worked out in the end.”

“The job for a skilled negotiator is to build enough trust to uncover what’s really important to everyone”

Buyers and sellers sometimes let their emotions take over, which can hobble the negotiating process, he adds. Often, emotion overshadows the professional advice the client receives from the Realtor.

“How important is that chandelier?” Gibbons asked rhetorically. “Emotion always seems to make the value of the items under negotiation worth more.”

When clients dig in their heels and refuse to negotiate, Gibbons often takes them back to the questions he asked during the qualifying process so they remember the bigger picture. He asks them to once again consider carefully what they need and want, and whether the property in question fulfils their requirements.

“In those cases, I know that it meets their needs because they’ve made an offer, so I remind them they might be upset later to lose a property they love because of a disagreement over vertical blinds,” he says.

“Negotiation is where Realtors can bring real value to a transaction,” says Suze Cumming, who sold real estate in Toronto for 25 years prior to opening the Canadian branch of the Negotiation Institute. She now coaches Realtors across the country on negotiating successfully. Cumming believes in a collaborative win-win approach, but says Realtors also need access to competitive tactics to be successful.

People are the complicating factor in any negotiation, says Cumming. “Real estate transactions are unique because there’s so much emotion involved,” she says. “If people don’t feel heard and understood, the negotiation process will be far more challenging.”

When clients dig in their heels on a given point, Cumming examines the stand the clients are taking, tries to understand their area of concern and probes further to discover what’s motivating their behaviour.

“The job for a skilled negotiator is to build enough trust to uncover what’s really important to everyone, and to make sure everyone’s needs are met.”

She recalls a situation when her buyers were among 10 bidders competing for a property they really wanted, but they were unwilling to “grossly overpay”. Cumming learned that the seller had his eye on another property. She advised her clients to submit an offer contingent upon the seller’s ability to purchase the house he wanted. He accepted their offer, even though it was lower than some of the other bids, because that offer took his own needs into account.

“That’s win-win collaborative deal-making,” Cumming says. “The offer put the buyers in a good position because it met everyone’s needs and the seller looked favourably on them.”

“Negotiation skills matter more than any other skills for Realtors because they create better experiences and outcomes for the clients.”

Negotiating Tips from the Three Sources Quoted Above:

Don’t be afraid to ask; the worst the other party can do is say no.
Make sure all agreements are written into the offer and the APS.
Negotiating is a learning process; if you make an error, learn for next time.
Become flawless in the essentials of real estate: legal issues, ethical issues, financial issues and negotiation.
Remember that clients, unlike Realtors, don’t negotiate daily. Don’t press them. Most people are reasonable if they are given enough time to think things through.
Share all relevant information with your clients so they can make good decisions.

Story by Elaine Smith

Sources: Suze Cumming, Michael Gibbons, Sharron Shortt

Editor’s Note: Suze Cumming teaches courses on negotiation in real estate across the country. Her course to become a Certified Negotiation Expert (CNE®1 designation) is being offered in May in Toronto at REALTOR® Quest, Canada’s largest REALTOR® trade show and conference. For details, visit www.thenatureofrealestate.com/negotiation or www.realtor-quest.ca.

Editorial Policy: The REALTOR® EDGE newsletter is produced 11 times a year by the Ontario Real Estate Association. The newsletter aims to provide practical and useful news and information about the real estate industry to members of the association. The opinions expressed in the newsletter are not necessarily those of the publisher. The newsletter welcomes submissions from the real estate community, including letters to the editor, opinion pieces, events and news. The newsletter reserves the right to edit, based on space restrictions and/or suitability, and/or to refuse submitted material for inclusion in the newsletter without reason. All rights reserved. Reproduction in whole or in part without the express written permission of the publisher, OREA, is prohibited. Contents are copyright of the Ontario Real Estate Association.

Editor: Mary Ann Gratton

Contributors to this issue: Merv Burgard, Mary Ann Gratton

Web Editor: Shade Lapite

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Let’s negotiate: Ability to reach agreement vital

Town of Oakville wins planning award

Oakville’s inZone project recognized for excellence in planning

On November 5, 2015, the Town of Oakville was presented with an Ontario Professional Planners Institute’s (OPPI) Excellence in Planning award at a ceremony held at Queen’s Park in Toronto. The town was recognized in the category of Municipal Statutory Planning Studies for their highly regarded inZone project, which helped guide the review and development of the town’s new zoning by-law. The town’s Joe Nethery, manager, Zoning By-law Project accepted the award.

“The inZone project resulted in a clear, concise, and user-friendly by-law that will help maintain and shape the charming nature and characteristics of our town,” Mayor Rob Burton said. “This award recognizes what can be achieved as we continue to work together to create Canada’s most livable town.”

The end result of the inZone project was Council’s unanimous passing of the town’s new Zoning By-law 2014-014. The by-law provides new zoning permissions and regulations expressed in the town’s official plan, and sets out the rules for what, where and how buildings can be constructed in Oakville. The inZone project implemented several significant improvements for public consultation, customer service, and information management related to land use regulation in Ontario.

Oakville’s inZone has been recognized by other municipalities, who seek to emulate the project in their zoning reviews.

“Zoning reviews are extremely technical processes. They rarely inspire great participation or recognition outside the project team. Oakville’s inZone project achieved both, and has shown how municipalities in Ontario and further afield can meaningfully engage a broad demographic and identify and implement process improvements,” said Mark Simeoni, director of Planning Services at the town.

The Excellence in Planning Awards recognize innovation, creativity, professionalism, problem-solving, and communications. Award recipients represent the best of the best in community planning across the province.

Oakville has been further recognized by the OPPI, who have asked town staff to sit on their Best Zoning By-laws of 2015 panel at their annual conference in Toronto.

About OPPI

The Ontario Professional Planners Institute (OPPI) is the recognized voice of the province’s planning profession. The institute’s more than 4,000 members work in government, private practice, universities, and not-for-profit agencies in the fields of urban and rural development, community design, environmental planning, transportation, health, social services, heritage conservation, housing, and economic development. Members meet quality practice requirements and are accountable to OPPI and the public to practice ethically and to abide by a Professional Code of Practice. Only full members are authorized by the Ontario Professional Planners Institute Act, 1994, to use the title Registered Professional Planner (RPP).


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Town of Oakville wins planning award

Municipal Revenue and the MLTT

In the 2014 Ontario budget, which will be introduced in mid-July, the government reaffirmed their commitment to upload the cost of social assistance benefit programs and court security and prisoner transportation costs off the property tax base. The 2008 Joint Provincial Municipal Fiscal and Social Service Delivery Review (PMFSDR) estimated that municipalities would see a net benefit of $1.5 billion per year by 2018. According to May 1st’s budget, “As a result of the uploads, municipalities are seeing over $1.5 billion in savings in 2014 alone, which is equivalent of nearly 10 per cent of property tax revenue in the province. These savings will continue to grow until full implementation of the provincial uploads by 2018”.

The budget also reiterated the government’s 2013 budget announcement to review options, “to ensure Ontario’s property tax system is fair, accurate and predictable”.

Most recently, in an interview with CTV Toronto, Premier Wynne indicated that the new Minister of Municipal Affairs and Housing would have to tackle the issue of allowing municipalities to raise taxes. With the exception of Toronto, municipalities in Ontario are limited to raising revenue through property taxes and user fees. The City of Toronto is unique, in that they were given expanded taxation powers under the City of Toronto Act, 2006. While the Act did not prescribe what tax the city could or should implement, the Act gave the city the authority to impose the Toronto land transfer tax.

Ontario REALTORS® understand that taxes are crucial to delivering social services all residents depend and count on. However, from provincial land transfer taxes to property taxes, Ontario home owners and home buyers already pay their fair share.

As a result of the MLTT in Toronto, the average home buyer in the city pays an average of $15,000 in municipal and provincial LTTs, upfront, every time they move. This may force many home owners to tolerate living in ill-suited homes for longer than they would have otherwise. For many other Torontonians, this increased cost creates a barrier to home ownership.

In addition, the MLTT has hurt the housing market and cost Toronto jobs. According to a study by the C.D. Howe Institute, the Toronto LTT resulted in a 16 percent drop in residential home sales. A study by Altus Group Economics Consulting found that since there were fewer real estate transactions the city lost $2.3 billion in economic activity as well as 15,000 jobs.

OREA’s GR team will continue monitoring any discussion on expanding municipal taxation powers and will continue to proactively work to prevent the spread of the MLTT to other Ontario municipalities.

For more information, please visit donttaxmydream.ca.

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Municipal Revenue and the MLTT

We Need a New Model

It is all about performance. It is about getting things done. Without action, knowledge is suspended in time. Without the necessary skills, knowledge is wasted. Learning is evident only when you demonstrate your knowledge by applying your skills in succeeding in doing the something you desire.

Sadly, contemporary learning is still troubled with too much text, a scarcity of practical case-studies, and inadequate opportunities to apply and practise learning objectives and skills. Consequently, education is too often seen as humdrum. Such boring programs and/or instruction mean a lack of learning. Leaners do not acquire all the necessary knowledge and skills that may even result in dislike for the material, the instructor, and the institute. If students do not perceive that they received value for their time and money, learning suffers and undesirable attitudes emerge.

Instructional design needs to focus on the learner. It cannot be traditionally linear. Knowledge presentation followed by a quiz followed by more content and yet another quiz, ad nausea, until all materials have been offered followed by a final exam is not learning with the greatest potential for understanding. This approach discounts such differences in learners as pacing, preferences, readiness levels, and personalities.

The solution is creating effective learning experiences based on instructional design best practices that place the learner at the centre of the process. Unfortunately, too often, everyone believes they know best and progress is stalled by opposing opinions.  It is as if watching golf on  TV qualifies viewers as PGA professionals.

In schooling, change is not as pervasive as you may have suspected.

Link to article – 

We Need a New Model

Town of Oakville wins Excellence in Economic Development Award

The International Economic Development Council (IEDC) has awarded a Silver Excellence in Economic Development Award to the Town of Oakville for its 2011 Economic Development Annual Report. The honour was announced at an awards ceremony during the IEDC Annual Conference in Houston, Texas on October 2, 2012.

“We’re very proud to be recognized by the IEDC as an economic development leader,” Mayor Rob Burton said. “The hard work of our business community and Economic Development staff ensures that Oakville is positioned as the choice location for successful businesses.”

The Town of Oakville 2011 Economic Development Annual Report is a comprehensive summary of development activity over the past year. It highlights various local companies, Oakville’s competitive position — relative to 25 area municipalities, economic development initiatives, and a look at development into 2012.

“We recognize the Town of Oakville for creating innovative and successful strategies to promote economic development in this period of global recovery,” said Jay Moon, IEDC chair. “Our awards honour organizations and individuals for their efforts in creating positive change in communities. The Town of Oakville demonstrates that they are at the forefront of the economic development profession and are using cutting-edge, effective practices that can be replicated in other communities.”

This annual report was initially conceived as a reporting tool for Council, but it has become a key resource for potential investors.

“Oakville has a dynamic cluster of businesses supporting innovation and growth and is a location of choice for over 300 national and international corporate headquarters,” said Dorothy St. George, director, Economic Development for the Town of Oakville. “Just recently, we welcomed Siemens Canada, Canadian Tire Financial Services and PricewaterhouseCoopers to our community.”

The town is also home to Sheridan Institute of Technology and Advanced Learning — named in 2012 as the top post-secondary school in the world for digital animation. Digital media and animation is one of the four major industry sectors shaping Oakville’s economic development strategy; the other three include professional and financial services, life sciences, and advanced manufacturing.

IEDC’s Excellence in Economic Development Awards recognizes the world’s best economic development programs and partnerships, marketing materials, and the year’s most influential leaders. These awards honour organizations and individuals for their efforts in creating positive change in urban, suburban, and rural communities.

Media contact

Dorothy St. George
Director, Economic Development
Town of Oakville
905-338-4240
dstgeorge@oakville.ca

Mary Jo Milhomens
Senior Communications Advisor
Town of Oakville
905-338-4244
mmilhomens@oakville.ca


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Town of Oakville wins Excellence in Economic Development Award

Nominees announced for the 2012 Community Spirit Awards

Tuesday, May 15, 2012 – for immediate release

Nominees announced for the 2012 Community Spirit Awards

Celebrating those residents, groups, organizations and businesses that make a positive impact on the community, the Town of Oakville is pleased to announce the nominees for the 11th Annual Community Spirit Awards.

Access Award – sponsored by MEDIchair Halton

Recognizes individuals, businesses or organizations that have made or are making a significant or ongoing voluntary contribution, beyond legislated requirements, to the well-being and advancement of people with disabilities. 

Stephen Cull
Pinegrove Public School (Al Barrett, Lisa Miali, Mikaela DeSilva, and Wynne Ann Huinink)

Arts Award – sponsored by The Oakville Beaver

Recognizes an individual or organization that, through their volunteerism, has contributed to nurturing and enhancing the arts in Oakville.

David Foster
Jean Grieve
Chloe Shackelton

Environmental Award – sponsored by Tim Hortons

Recognizes an individual or organization whose outstanding voluntary contribution of environmental stewardship has helped to enhance or protect Oakville’s environment.

Nora and Dan Fulcher
Blake Poland

Group Volunteer Award – sponsored by Sun Life Financial

Recognizes a group of three or more individuals who have come together to volunteer their time toward a shared goal/activity or event involving leadership, innovation and creativity. Activities or events can benefit all ages. 

Enza Natural Health Centre and Day Spa
Halton Food For Thought
Halton Unit Canadian Cancer Society, Transportation Volunteers
Walls of Hope

Heritage and History Award – sponsored by Genworth Financial Canada

Recognizes an individual or organization that has made an outstanding contribution to Oakville’s heritage and history by aiding in the preservation and celebration of Oakville’s natural, built and cultural heritage.

George Chisholm

Individual Volunteer Award – sponsored by Paradiso Restaurant

Recognizes an individual who has made an outstanding volunteer contribution towards improving the well-being of Oakville residents of any age group.

Cheryl Kozak
Sera Mansueto
Niki McLaughlin
George Murray
Bryan Pryde
Bob Trillia

Senior Award – sponsored by Sunrise Senior Living

Recognizes a senior (65 years and older) or group that has made an outstanding voluntary contribution to the Oakville community.

Darlene Cox
Colin Woodcock

Youth Award – sponsored by RBC Royal Bank

Recognizes a youth individual or group (18 years and under) that has made positive contributions towards enriching Oakville’s quality of life.

Oakville Trafalgar Student Volunteers High School Lunch Buddies Club
Youth Alpha Leadership Team

Buy your tickets for Community Spirit Awards

The 11th Annual Community Spirit Awards will be held on Wednesday, June 13, 2012 at the Oakville Conference and Banquet Centre. Tickets are $30 and can be purchased by calling 905-338-4250. Each award recipient will receive an original art piece created specifically for the Community Spirit Awards by Sheridan Institute of Technology and Advanced Learning student Vanesa Trillia.

For more information, visit the Community Spirit Awards page.

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For more information contact

Nancy Beddoe
Steering Committee Chair
905-845-6601, ext. 3976
csa@oakville.ca

Kimberly Moser
Senior Communications Advisor
905-845-6601, ext. 3096
kmoser@oakville.ca


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Nominees announced for the 2012 Community Spirit Awards

Oakville Community Spirit Awards honour outstanding volunteers

Thursday, June 23, 2011 – for immediate release

Oakville Community Spirit Awards honour outstanding volunteers

Now in its 10th year, the Community Spirit Awards continue to prove that the spirit of volunteerism in Oakville is alive and well! A full-house packed the Oakville Conference Centre at last night’s awards ceremony, showcasing an impressive blend of volunteers—all passionate about their community.

“Without a doubt, volunteerism is the backbone of Oakville and what truly makes this town such a unique community,” Oakville Mayor Rob Burton said. “On behalf of Council, I congratulate and thank the recipients and nominees of this year’s Community Spirit Awards.”

MC Chris Mei, national prime time host on the Weather Network entertained the audience while sponsors handed out eight awards, beautifully hand-crafted glass sculptures created by artist Chris Laskey, a student from the Sheridan Institute of Technology and Advanced Learning’s Craft and Design program.

“We wish we could recognize each and every volunteer in Oakville,” Nina de Vaal, director of Recreation and Culture said. “This year’s nominees are incredibly diverse and have demonstrated innovative and creative ways to volunteer their time. We applaud you for making a difference in our community and encourage others to follow suit.”

Recipients of the 2011 Oakville Community Spirit Awards are:

Access Award: David Cole – sponsored by MEDIchair Halton
Arts Award: Stacey Sinclair – sponsored by the Oakville Beaver
Environmental Award: Lisa Seiler – sponsored by Tim Hortons
Group Volunteer Award: The May Court Club of Oakville – sponsored by Sun Life Financial
Heritage and History Award: Barbara Anne McAlpine – sponsored by Genworth Financial Canada
Individual Volunteer Award: Scott Snowball – sponsored by Paradiso Restaurant
Senior Award: Edel Brasher and Anna Pittens – sponsored by Sunrise Senior Living
Youth Award: Keelee Buhlau – sponsored by RBC Royal Bank

The Oakville Community Spirit Awards recognize individuals and groups for their outstanding contribution to the Oakville community. 

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For more information:

Janine Ivings
Senior Communications Advisor
905-845-6601, ext. 3005
jivings@oakville.ca


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Oakville Community Spirit Awards honour outstanding volunteers

Oakville launches 10th Annual Community Spirit Awards

Wednesday, March 09, 2011 – for immediate release

Oakville launches 10th Annual Community Spirit Awards

Nominate a community champion today!

Oakville Mayor Rob Burton officially launched the 10th Annual Community Spirit Awards last night at Town Hall, encouraging Oakville residents to nominate community champions they admire and appreciate for an award.

“We’re looking for Oakville’s shining stars, who through their volunteer efforts alone are putting us one step closer to achieving our vision of becoming the most livable town in Canada,” Mayor Burton said. “We want to recognize these outstanding individuals, organizations, businesses and groups who are active in the community by nominating them for an Oakville Community Spirit Award.”

Nominations will be accepted until April 15, 2011 in the following categories:

Access Award, sponsored by MEDIchair Halton
Arts Award, sponsored by The Oakville Beaver
Environmental Award, sponsored by Tim Hortons
Group Volunteer Award, sponsored by Sun Life Financial
Heritage and History Award, sponsored by Genworth Financial Canada
Individual Volunteer Award, sponsored by Paradiso Restaurant
Senior Award, sponsored by Sunrise Senior Living
Youth Award, sponsored by RBC Royal Bank

Nomination forms are available for pick-up at Town Hall, community centres, library branches or can be completed on the Community Spirit Awards page.

The awards ceremony will be held on Wednesday, June 22, 2011 at the Oakville Conference and Banquet Centre. Award recipients will receive an original art piece created specifically for the Community Spirit Awards by Sheridan Institute of Technology and Advanced Learning student/award artist Chris Laskey.

For more information about Oakville’s Community Spirit Award categories and nomination requirements visit the Community Spirit Awards page.

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For more information

Susan Fanelli
Recreation Supervisor
Town of Oakville
905-845-6601, ext. 3155
sfanelli@oakville.ca

Janine Ivings
Senior Communications Advisor
Town of Oakville
905-845-6601, ext. 3005
jivings@oakville.ca


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Oakville launches 10th Annual Community Spirit Awards

What’s Happening at Town Hall – January 25 to 29, 2010

Friday, January 22, 2010 – for immediate release

What’s Happening at Town Hall – January 25 to 29, 2010

January 22, 2010 – For immediate release

Do you want to know what’s happening at Town Hall? Are you interested in participating in local government? Here’s a highlight of what’s happening January 25–29, 2010.

January 25

Planning and Development Council
Location: Town Hall, Council Chamber, 1225 Trafalgar Road, 7–10 p.m.

Consent items:
Subdivision agreement – New Province Homes, Metrus Developments, phase 10, file: 24T-07006 (SD.432.8) — report from Development Services, January 6, 2010

Discussion items:
Bed and breakfast review – land use policies and regulations — report from Planning Services, January 4, 2010
Memorandum of understanding with Sheridan Institute — report from Economic Development department, January 5, 2010

January 26

Administrative Services Committee
Location: Town Hall, Committee Room 2, 1225 Trafalgar Road, 7–10 p.m.

Consent item:
Oakville Hydro lease renewal — report from Legal department, January 11, 2010

Discussion item:
Advance voting dates and hours — report from Clerk’s department, January 4, 2010

Committee of Adjustment
Location: Town Hall, Council Chamber 1225 Trafalgar Road, 7–10:30 p.m.

January 27

Environmental Strategic Plan Advisory Committee
Location: Town Hall, Oakville Room, 1225 Trafalgar Road, 7–9 p.m.

Oakville Harbours Committee
Location: Town Hall, Committee Room 2, 1225 Trafalgar Road, 7:30–10 p.m.

What’s Happening at Town Hall provides an overview of upcoming Town of Oakville meetings and other events. The public is welcome to attend these meetings. For agendas and copies of reports, please visit Agendas and Minutes. For more information and additional upcoming meetings, please visit the Council Calendar or Public Notices.

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For more information:
Kathy Patrick
Supervisor, Council & Committee Services
Town of Oakville
905-845-6601, ext. 4235
kpatrick@oakville.ca


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What’s Happening at Town Hall – January 25 to 29, 2010