#BurlON til Feb 20

It’s a busy week with Valentine’s Day and Family Day Weekend, as well as it…

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#BurlON til Feb 20

Freeman Station

Freeman Station is one of the last surviving Grand Trunk Railway stations, following the loss of…

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Freeman Station

Heritage Matters in #BurlON

Our lovely city of Burlington has a rich heritage-structural, oral and cultural. If you’re looking…

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Heritage Matters in #BurlON

#BurlON til Oct 24

We are already midway through October and we are finally seeing signs that it is…

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#BurlON til Oct 24

What’s Inside? Doors Open Burlington

On Saturday, September 29, 2018, 12 sites across Burlington will open their doors and give…

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What’s Inside? Doors Open Burlington

Burlington Public Art

Over the last year we have had the opportunity to work with our Mayor, Rick Goldring, as he wrote several blogs for us and shared some of his favourite seasonal things to see and do.  Today, we had the pleasure of … Continue reading →

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Burlington Public Art

Culture Days Weekend in Burlington

As Culture Days Canada and Ontario celebrate their 7th anniversary, Burlington is getting more involved than ever by making arts and culture accessible to the community. This year’s Culture Days will feature many different types of artists, activities and events, … Continue reading →

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Culture Days Weekend in Burlington

Oakville gets creative with Canada 150 Mosaic Mural Project

Thursday, January 14, 2016 – for immediate release

Oakville gets creative with Canada 150 Mosaic Mural Project

Residents invited to paint a tile for community mural celebrating history and culture of Canada

Oakville residents will have an exciting opportunity to pay tribute to Canada’s upcoming 150th anniversary when the Canada 150 Mosaic Mural Project comes to town in February 2016.

The Canada 150 Mosaic Mural Project will bring together 150 communities and thousands of participants to create community murals that visually reflect the history and culture of Canada. Oakville’s unique mural will be composed of 750 tiles, each measuring four inches square that will be painted by residents during registered workshops at the Queen Elizabeth Park Community and Cultural Centre (QEPCCC) on February 13 and 14, as well as various drop-in workshops on Family Day, February 15.

“Oakville is proud to be chosen to participate in this national initiative,” Mayor Rob Burton said. “It’s a great opportunity for our community’s cultural history to be celebrated as part of the mosaic mural commemorating Canada.”

Participants will be asked to paint an individual tile representing their community from their own creative perspective, but you don’t have to be an artist to take part. Each tile painting will become a piece of a much bigger story when all 150 community murals are virtually connected to form one gigantic railway-themed mural mosaic connecting the country from coast to coast.

The official public unveiling of Oakville’s community mural will take place at QEPCCC on Tuesday, February 16 at 10 a.m. It will be on exhibit from March 5 to April, 2016 in the main gallery.

The Canada 150 Mosaic Mural Project is led by internationally recognized artist Lewis Lavoie and his Mural Mosaic Team based out of Alberta. To follow the mural’s progress across Canada, visit the Canada 150 Mosaic website.

For more information about Oakville’s mural or to register for a painting workshop visit our Canada 150 celebrations in Oakville page.


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Tourism Burlington Celebrates 30 Years

We’re throwing it back to the summer of ’85, when Tourism Burlington was officially established as a destination marketing organization.  What did Burlington look like thirty years ago?  What attracted people to visit? Here are a few interesting facts which … Continue reading →

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Tourism Burlington Celebrates 30 Years

Put a little history in your teaching

Forget history and you are doomed to repeat it is a saying for myopic minds. I’m not disputing the veracity of the statement. I am taking issue with the narrowness of how so many people have interpreted it.

For elementary and secondary students, you often hear the lament, “What do I care about past World Wars. There are more catastrophic calamities in our modern world?” I oft-times wonder if they mean a computer malfunction, smeared make-up, or having to do homework.

For college and university students, you hear that the study of history can’t be monetized. It’s not going to get me a high paying job. Generally, many folks say that history is ancient and of scant value. Just like Jackie De Shannon hit song, “Put a Little Love in Your Heart,” if you want to take your learning to a better place, ground your content within an historical framework.

History, and the teaching of it, is essential to civilized society. I refer to history as all accumulated knowledge, and teaching as a professional trademark for those individuals who, through dedicated study and practice, inspire students to acquire relevant, complex knowledge and critical thinking skills that sustain individual development and society’s growth.

Whatever your subject area, knowing the history – even condensed – behind its principles and core competencies provides a broader based understanding. For example, you will gain a superior capacity to comprehend real estate curricula if you possess an historical appreciation on our legal, financial, and social systems.

 

Talented teachers, not just computer programs, are invaluable, vital impetus to this life-long learning adventure. Learning is a cooperative venture and effective, purposeful teachers are central to this process.

 

Great teachers connect with students immediately through activities and demonstrate the historical importance of the concepts at hand, creating thoughtful, relevant challenges for students to consider critically. They foster participation and enthusiasm among students by grounding the learning in an historical context.

 

Questionable teachers slip-slide out of their authoritative leadership role through superficial coverage of key learning. They focus on personal, rather than intellectual, rapport with students that borders on professional misconduct.

To help students succeed, it is imperative that everyone is treated with friendliness and equality. No one does this more professionally than the committed facilitator who add a little bit of history in their lessons.

 

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Put a little history in your teaching