OMB approves Bronte Green application for development of former Saw-Whet Golf Course lands

Thursday, July 6, 2017 – for immediate release

OMB approves Bronte Green application for development of former Saw-Whet Golf Course lands

Decision approves settlement negotiated last fall

The Ontario Municipal Board (OMB) has released its decision formally approving the negotiated settlement that was reached between the Town of Oakville, the Region of Halton, Conservation Halton and Bronte Green last fall concerning the development of the lands at 1401 Bronte Road.

“The OMB’s decision to approve the town’s settlement with Bronte Green was the best possible outcome that we could achieve at the OMB,” Mayor Burton said. “In the settlement, Bronte Green agreed to significant concessions to respond to all of the issues raised by the town including protecting green space and addressing key environmental concerns over wildlife and flood protection. While it would have been desirable to preserve all this land, legally that was simply not possible in this case.”

The approved development proposal permits Bronte Green to build a residential community with limited retail, and a mix of single family homes, townhouses and low-rise apartments located on Bronte Road. This proposed transit-friendly community will also include a school, parks and a trail system while preserving sensitive environmental lands that are critical habitat to endangered and other species of wildlife.

The town had opposed the original Bronte Green application as being premature and not in the public interest. This position was based on serious concerns with the draft plan and the underlying technical studies. The town engaged a team of 15 witnesses representing a variety of scientific and planning disciplines to put forth its case.

Following extensive negotiations, Bronte Green made significant changes to its original development proposal to reflect the concerns raised by the Town of Oakville, Region of Halton, Conservation Halton and the community. These changes included:

Dedicating a significant parcel of land to enhance the woodlands
Creating a high value habitat for species including snapping turtles.
Increasing the size of the buffer around the natural features from 10 to 30 metres in order to better protect the natural heritage system from the impacts of development and to reduce flood and erosion impacts.
Constructing storm water management systems which insure that there will be no additional risk of downstream flooding.
Removing the vehicular bridge previously proposed over the Fourteen Mile Creek which posed a threat to endangered species of fish.
Securing a permanent natural heritage linkage to Bronte Creek Provincial Park.
Reserving an elementary school site adjacent to a centrally located neighbourhood park.
Increasing density on portions of the site to support transit-friendly development along Bronte Road, and preserve more parkland

For more information visit the Bronte Green Corporation development application page.


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OMB approves Bronte Green application for development of former Saw-Whet Golf Course lands

Canada’s Largest Ribfest 2016

Over the past 21 years, Canada’s Largest Ribfest has become a Labour Day weekend tradition here in Burlington.  In 2009, Ribfest broke attendance records with over 175,000 in attendance, over 150,000 lbs of ribs sold and over $3 million dollars has been … Continue reading →

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Canada’s Largest Ribfest 2016

Innovative Health Sciences and Technology District takes steps forward

Friday, July 29, 2016 – for immediate release

Innovative Health Sciences and Technology District takes steps forward

Proposed work-live business park first of its kind in Oakville

The concept of an innovative Health, Science and Technology District (HSTD) near the new Oakville Trafalgar Memorial Hospital (OTMH) will continue to move forward following Council’s endorsement of land use parameters. The approved parameters will assist Oakville Green Developments Inc. in further redefining their development proposal for the district. The application will require further studies and a statutory public meeting later this fall before going to Council for final approval.

Conceptually, a HSTD would be a unique work-live area that would attract and accommodate health science industries as well as research and technology firms in a compact urban hub. It would support the town’s economic development strategy and would build on significant public investment made to the hospital. Located on a 15.32 hectare piece of land at the northeast corner of Third Line and Dundas Street West just east of the OTMH, the proposed district would result in 4.5 million square feet of leasable area with building heights ranging from eight to 32 storeys and potentially feature close to 9,000 jobs and over 2,000 residents.

“This Health Sciences and Technology District would be a world-class community, generating thousands of knowledge-based jobs in Oakville,” said Mayor Burton. “Staff will continue to work with the developer on their application in accordance with the principles Council has endorsed. I also urge residents to share their thoughts on this project once public meetings are scheduled.”

Next steps in the application process include technical studies, including traffic and financial impact studies that will define the infrastructure needs (scope and cost) necessary to support the proposed HSTD. Other plans will also need to be developed including urban design, architectural, tree canopy, waste management, pedestrian circulation, and use of open space. Once complete, a comprehensive resubmission of the application would be made by the Oakville Green Developments Inc. which would follow a typical review process, including public meetings.

The Health Sciences and Technology District is just one component of a Health-Oriented, Mixed-Use Node (HOMUN) called for in the town’s North Oakville West Secondary Plan. Other components include the hospital and ErinoakKids Oakville.

For more information, review the full staff report under Discussion Items in the July 25, 2016 Planning and Development Council agenda.


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Ontario Budget 2016

Ontario’s Minister of Finance, Charles Sousa, presented the government’s 2016 Budget to the Legislature yesterday. The budget outlined the government’s plan to create jobs, grow the economy, invest in major infrastructure projects, low-carbon initiatives and programs to improve Ontario’s workforce. The Minister indicated that the government is on track to eliminate the deficit by 2017-18.

What does the 2016 Budget mean for Ontario REALTORS®?

Municipal Land Transfer Tax (MLTT): We are happy to report that Budget 2016 does not reverse the province’s commitment not to give municipalities MLTT powers. OREA continues to monitor for legislation that would give any new revenue tools to municipalities.

Personal Real Estate Corporations (PRECs): Unfortunately, the government did not include OREA’s pre-budget recommendation to permit the use of PRECs by real estate salespeople or brokers. OREA will continue to advocate for this proposal.

Cap-and-Trade Initiative: Ontario will move forward with a cap-and-trade system as its carbon pricing mechanism. The government estimates that the cap-and-trade plan will add about 4.3 cents a litre to the price of gasoline and about $5 a month to natural gas bills.

Ontario Home Energy Audits and Retrofits: The budget reconfirms the home energy audit and retrofit program introduced earlier this month. The program would invest $100 million from the Ontario Green Investment Fund to provide rebates for home owners with Enbridge or Union Gas to conduct an energy audit and retrofits recommended by the auditor. While OREA is supportive of the new program, we will continue to oppose any efforts to introduce mandatory home energy audits.

Ontario Retirement Pension Plan/Pooled Registered Pension Plan: The budget announces the government’s commitment to move forward with the ORPP. The government also reaffirmed that their long term objective is to enhance the CPP.

Changing Workplaces Review: OREA is currently involved in the Employment Standards Act, 2000 review, advocating to maintain the current exemption for real estate professionals. Budget 2016 announces that the Special Advisor’s leading the consultation will release their interim report by early 2016 and the full report in summer 2016.

Healthy Homes Renovation Tax Credit (HHRTC): Budget 2016 announced that the HHRTC will end on January 1st, 2017. The HHRTC was created to help seniors live independently in their homes by making renovations more affordable.

For more information on the Ontario Budget please visit the Ministry of Finance’s website.

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Ontario Budget 2016

Town of Oakville expands natural heritage system to include lands along Fourteen Mile Creek Valley

Tuesday, June 16, 2015 – for immediate release

Town of Oakville expands natural heritage system to include lands along Fourteen Mile Creek Valley

On June 15, 2015, Town Council unanimously approved an official plan amendment that will see approximately 81 hectares of land along the Fourteen Mile Creek Valley designated as natural heritage system.

“Approving this amendment is an important step to ensure we not only protect, but grow our green space,” Mayor Rob Burton said. “Our residents have been very clear that they want the Fourteen Mile Creek Valley protected and Council and I are meeting that goal.”

The official plan amendment (OPA) designates most of the publically owned lands along the Fourteen Mile Creek Valley as Natural Area under the town’s Livable Oakville Plan — the town’s official plan.

The province is currently undertaking a review of the Greenbelt Plan and this official plan amendment is a critical step in order to have the province even consider including these lands as part of the Greenbelt Plan under the Urban River Valley designation.

The Urban River Valley designation was added to province’s Greenbelt Plan in 2013 and characterizes lands containing natural and hydrologic features and/or designated in municipal official plans for uses such as parks, open space, recreation, conservation and environmental protection.

The lands in the OPA are owned by the Province of Ontario with the exception of the stormwater management facilities owned by the town, and are located along Fourteen Mile Creek Valley between Upper Middle Road to the north and the QEW to the south.


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Council approves 2015–2018 Strategic Plan

Tuesday, May 26, 2015 – for immediate release

Council approves 2015–2018 Strategic Plan

Plan highlights key actions to achieve Council’s vision: To be the most livable town in Canada

Town Council unanimously approved their 2015–2018 Strategic Plan at last night’s Council meeting. The plan builds upon the success of the previous Council’s 2011–2014 Strategic Plan, and sets out new actions to help achieve Council’s vision for Oakville “to be the most livable town in Canada.”

“Setting a clear strategic direction will ensure that we continue to meet the needs of the community,” said Mayor Rob Burton. “We are committed to working with residents, businesses and community partners to achieve our vision for Oakville to be the most livable town in Canada.”

Since 2007, Oakville has adopted a mission-driven approach to strategic planning that converts the town’s vision, mission and values into strategic goals. Council then establishes its work plan based on those strategic goals which it believes require the greatest attention. For 2015–2018, Council has identified five areas of focus:

Good Governance
Environmental Leadership
Economic Growth
Fiscal Sustainability
Outstanding Service to our Residents

Town CAO Ray Green noted that Council’s strategic goals will be measured and tracked annually, and are fully integrated into departmental business plans and budgets.

“Integrating Council’s strategic goals into departmental business plans ensures that staff goals are fully aligned to Council’s strategic priorities,” said Ray Green. “This is not a strategic plan that we only look at once a year. Staff incorporates Council’s goals into every decision we make, and every report we bring to Council.”

For more information visit the Strategic Plan page.


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Town to fight the development of the Saw-Whet Golf Course

Monday, April 13, 2015 – for immediate release

Town to fight the development of the Saw-Whet Golf Course

Development application from Bronte Green Corporation considered premature and not in the public interest

Town Council has directed staff to fight Bronte Green Corporation’s application to develop a new subdivision on the existing Saw-Whet Golf Course. Ontario Municipal Board (OMB) hearings on the application are scheduled to get underway on October 13, 2015, with the next pre-hearing scheduled for May 1, 2015. Bronte Green Corporation took its application to the OMB after the town did not consider the application within the timeframe specified in the Planning Act. The complexity of the required studies, and the developer’s delay in providing the required studies, led to significant delays in the overall process.

“Council cannot in good conscience consider a development application when all of the required studies are not yet complete,” Mayor Rob Burton said. “We are committed to taking an evidence-based approach to decision making, and we are confident that the OMB will agree that this is the right approach to take when we are making decisions that will impact our community for generations to come.”

Council also directed staff to schedule a public meeting to look at designating the publicly-owned lands within the study area with the appropriate natural heritage designation. This process would smooth the way for these lands to be considered as part of the ten year review of the provincial Greenbelt Plan.

The proposed Bronte Green application covers 55.1 hectares of land and proposes over 750 new residential units.


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Humane Society reports increased number of raccoons with distemper

Canine Distemper does not pose health risk to humans

The Oakville & Milton Humane Society (OMHS) is reporting a higher than normal number of cases of raccoons suffering from Canine Distemper Virus (CDV) in the Oakville area. So far this year, the OMHS has received 300 cases of raccoons exhibiting signs of this illness, up from the average 130 cases per year.

Canine Distemper is a viral disease affecting animals in the canine families, in addition to some other mammals, affecting their respiratory, gastrointestinal and nervous systems. Raccoons are pre-disposed to Canine Distemper but it poses no health risk to humans.

Raccoons exhibiting the signs of Canine Distemper will move slowly and may appear to stumble as they walk. They are very passive and may wander aimlessly showing no response to noise or people but may become aggressive if cornered. Often a mucus discharge is present around the eyes and nose which may be accompanied by coughing, diarrhea, vomiting, tremors and seizures.

“These poor animals suffer greatly with the virus and unfortunately it is almost always lethal to them,” said Laura Mackasey, Manager of Animal Protective Services for the Oakville & Milton Humane Society. “The best we do for them is to humanely and compassionately end their pain.”

Canine Distemper can be transferred to dogs if they come into contact with an infected raccoon. Most dogs are vaccinated against distemper as puppies. If you do not know if your dog has been vaccinated against distemper, check with your veterinarian. It is important to keep your dog on a leash when on walks and to check backyards before letting dogs out.

Even though the Canine Distemper Virus is not transmittable to humans, it is important to remember not to approach a raccoon at any time as they may become aggressive if cornered. To discourage raccoons or any wildlife from coming onto your property, do not leave any food out. At this time, it would also be advised to take down any bird feeders, ensure all garbage, recycling and GreenCarts are secure and left out on the morning of your regular pick up, and explain to your children why they should not approach raccoons or any wildlife animals even if they seem docile.

If you see a raccoon exhibiting any of the signs of Canine Distemper Virus, contact the OMHS at 905-845-1551. This line is available 24 hours a day, seven days a week. Please be sure to include the time and location of the sighting so that OMHS officers can attend and safely remove the raccoon.

The Oakville & Milton Humane Society and the Town of Oakville are working together to ensure residents, schools and veterinarians are informed. For more details on Canine Distemper Virus, visit the OMHS website. The Town of Oakville has a list of frequently asked questions on their website. Visit the raccoons page for more information.

Media contact:

Brenda Dushko
Manager, Fund Development & Communications
Oakville & Milton Humane Society
905-845-1551, ext. 19
905-208-0295 (mobile)
brenda@omhs.ca

Town of Oakville contact:

Mary Jo Milhomens
Senior Communications Advisor
Town of Oakville
905-338-4244
maryjo.milhomens@oakville.ca


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Humane Society reports increased number of raccoons with distemper

Town announces new Commissioner of Community Services

Tuesday, April 30, 2013 – for immediate release

Town announces new Commissioner of Community Services

Oakville will have a new commissioner of Community Services on June 3, 2013. Colleen Bell will join the town’s management team from the City of Guelph. She was selected following a comprehensive search and evaluation of candidates.

“Colleen’s strong background leading significant community and corporate projects, as well as her excellent track record managing the complexities and demands of large departments made her an excellent choice to lead this commission,” said Ray Green, chief administrative officer, Town of Oakville. “I am confident that she will make a wonderful addition to our executive management team and she’ll do a great job managing priorities and delivering quality services to our community.”

Ms. Bell’s responsibilities at the town will include overseeing the largest town commission that brings together all of the major services that impact the daily life of our residents including: Oakville Transit, Roads and Works Operations, Fire Services, Recreation and Culture, Parks and Open Space, and Libraries. She joins the Town of Oakville with an impressive career with Metro Toronto, the City of Toronto, Metrolinx and the City of Guelph, where she served most recently as executive director, Community and Social Services.

“On behalf of Town Council, I am delighted to welcome Colleen Bell to the Town of Oakville,” said Mayor Rob Burton. “We look forward to working with Colleen and believe her skills in community engagement, stakeholder relationships, customer service and transportation services will be a benefit to our community.”

Ms. Bell takes over the commissioner role from Dave Bloomer who is retiring after 34 years with the Town of Oakville. Mr. Bloomer’s last day in the office is May 17, 2013.

A high resolution photo of Colleen Bell is available upon request.

Media contact:

Jane Courtemanche
Director, Strategy, Policy and Communications
Town of Oakville
905-845-6601, ext. 3038
jcourtemanche@oakville.ca


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Town does its part to reduce waste

Tuesday, October 16, 2012 – for immediate release

Town does its part to reduce waste

Waste Reduction Week – October 15-19

Waste Reduction Week is all about looking at ways that you can reduce waste at home and the office. As the town celebrates Waste Reduction Week, it takes a look at a number of initiatives that educate and encourage both staff and residents to reduce, reuse and recycle.

“The town is participating in several waste reduction programs as part of its commitment to enhancing the natural environment,” said Cindy Toth, director of Environmental Policy at the Town of Oakville. “Waste Reduction Week is a great way for people to think about ways they can reduce their waste. We encourage all our residents and their families to do their part to help our environment.”

In 2009, the Town of Oakville adopted a Towards Zero Waste Procedure. Through this procedure, town staff diverted an average of 70 per cent of waste from the Halton landfill simply by learning about proper recycling and composting methods. A few initiatives from the procedure included banning plastic water bottles at all town facilities, placing only recycling and compost containers in staff offices — no garbage containers, printing double-sided when possible, and providing recycling boxes and GreenCarts in all public areas and meeting rooms. On average, only 25 per cent of all waste generated at town hall leaves as actual garbage.

The town has also implemented a number of other environmental initiatives that have shown great success over the years:

Recycled 413 cell phones and collected 11 kilograms of batteries through the Call2Recycle program
Collected over 200 pounds of wine corks for Jelinek Cork Group to recycle
Sent 31,056 litres of motor oil for re-refining
Collected 45 gallons of used anti-freeze from boat owners at the town’s harbours hazardous waste collection site as part of the Clean Marine program
Saved 51 tonnes of greenhouse gas emissions in one year by having Oakville Transit refine their used motor oil
Diverted over 16,000 plastic containers from the landfill since implementing recycling bins at town sports fields
Joined the Recycling Council of Ontario’s Take Back the Light Program to ensure that all expired fluorescent tubes and bulbs are rid of their mercury content and properly recycled

“There are many ways each of us can help reduce waste,” added Toth. “Individual residents and community organizations can truly make a difference one item at a time.”

For more ideas on how to reduce, reuse and recycle items including ink cartridges, cell phones, computers, glasses, batteries and clothes, visit oakville.ca and search for garbage and recycling or contact the town’s Environmental Policy department at 905-845-6601 or email environment@oakville.ca.

About Waste Reduction Week

Waste Reduction Week in Canada was developed in 2001 by a coalition of 13 recycling councils and sister organizations from across Canada and is delivered each October by the same group. The program’s goal is to inform Canadians about the environmental and social ramifications of wasteful practices. Waste Reduction Week provides Canadians with information and ideas to reduce waste in all facets of daily living, creating solutions to the many environmental challenges we face.

Media Contact:

Prabh Banga
Environmental Policy Coordinator
Town of Oakville
905-845-6601, ext.3948
pbanga@oakville.ca

Mary Jo Milhomens
Senior Communications Advisor
Town of Oakville
905-338-424
mmilhomens@oakville.ca


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