This Saturday power down for Earth Hour!

Tuesday, March 21, 2017 – for immediate release

This Saturday power down for Earth Hour!

Take part in the Earth Hour movement on Saturday, March 25 from 8:30 – 9:30 p.m.

Earth Hour is back! Join the town and citizens from 7,000 cities around the world to make a global statement in support of action on climate change. From 8:30 to 9:30 p.m. this Saturday, turn off non-essential lights and unplug electronics. Try a candlelight dinner, board games by flashlight, stargazing by the lake, or a moonlight stroll.

“Energy conservation and environmental stewardship are year-round priorities for the town,” said Mayor Rob Burton. “Earth Hour reminds us that even small actions can have a big impact on our natural environment. Together we can create a cleaner, greener Oakville.”

The town will take part by turning off all non-essential lights and marquee signs at town facilities and parking lots where possible without compromising public safety or interfering with services. Tweet @townofoakville with the hashtag #ChangeClimateChange or post on the town’s Facebook page to show how you participated in Earth Hour.

Last year, businesses, residents and the town reduced energy consumption by five per cent (8,831kwh) during Earth Hour. This year, the town aims to beat that and see even larger savings throughout the community

Starting March 25 you can also head to the Oakville Public Library, Central Branch to learn how you can be part of the Earth Hour movement every day and try the “Rock the Bike” pedal-powered bike-charging station. This will kick off an Earth Month display series at participating Oakville Public Libraries.

Visit oakville.ca for information on how to participate in annual and year-round energy conservation and environmental stewardship initiatives, including:

Keep Calm and Adapt: Emergency and Weather Preparedness event – May 6, 2017
Oakville Conserves Energy Fair – May 27, 2017
Prepare to be Prepared Challenge – registrations starts in April
Update of the Environmental Strategic Plan – opportunities for public contributions begin later this year

Earth Hour is a global lights-out initiative created by the World Wildlife Fund to encourage individuals, businesses and governments around the world to take accountability for their ecological footprint. Earth Hour 2016 took place in more than 7,000 cities and towns in 172 countries and territories across all seven continents. Residents, businesses and community groups are encouraged to register their Earth Hour event at earthhour.org.


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Town’s new video demonstrates what to do if you encounter a coyote

Monday, June 6, 2016 – for immediate release

Town’s new video demonstrates what to do if you encounter a coyote

Hazing video part of the town’s public awareness campaign to reduce coyote conflicts

While seeing a coyote in Oakville is not necessarily cause for alarm, there is an understandable concern when coyotes come a bit too close for comfort. The town’s new coyote hazing video explains what to do if you encounter a coyote on your property, and demonstrates how to “haze” or scare away coyotes so they do not feel comfortable being around people.

Though coyotes are commonly found in urban areas such as Oakville, they are usually wary animals and are not considered to be a significant risk to people. However, intentional and unintentional feeding, tolerating them on our property, and allowing pets to roam freely contribute to coyotes losing their inhibitions towards people and becoming more brazen around domestic pets.

“With a healthy fear of humans, coyotes can co-exist peacefully with us. This short video gives some simple instructions on how we can help maintain a coyote’s fear of humans and deter them from approaching our backyards and play spaces,” said Cindy Toth, director, Environmental Policy.

Hazing involves using actions and loud noises to make the coyote feel uncomfortable and unwelcome. The video shows the simplest method of hazing a coyote is being loud, appearing large and shouting at it to “go away!” Other techniques include spraying with a hose, throwing small sticks, or waving a rake or other large or shiny objects.

While regular hazing around your home and neighbourhood is important, the video advises not to haze coyotes in their natural environment such as woodlands where they may have dens. Staying on trails and keeping dogs on a short leash is especially important this time of year when coyote pups may be in the den or out seeking food such as grasshoppers and mice in wooded or grassy areas.

The video also recommends residents ensure their property is an unwelcome environment by removing attractants such as pet food, compost, and brush piles, and not leaving pets unattended outdoors.

The video was produced in response to an increase in coyote sightings in Oakville last winter and joins a number of measures the town has put in place to help minimize coyote disturbances. The town’s coyote public awareness program includes:

coyote awareness signs in key areas where coyotes have been sighted;
community workshops and education session in areas where increased coyote activity is reported;
wildlife-proof lids on garbage bins throughout the town;
notices to residents in key areas as a reminder to not dump household refuse or food waste in town bins, parks or trails;
enforced town by-laws including littering, property standards, and dogs off leash;
a coyote reporting form and mapping feature on the town’s website.

The coyote hazing video can be found on the town’s YouTube channel or on the coyote page.


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Oakville community digs in to plant trees at Shannon Creek Trail

Monday, May 16, 2016 – for immediate release

Oakville community digs in to plant trees at Shannon Creek Trail

Union Gas supports woodlands restoration project

On May 14, 2016, about 60 community volunteers planted 750 trees at Shannon Creek Trail to help reforest the woodland which lost its ash trees due to Emerald Ash Borer (EAB). At the event, Acting Mayor, Councillor Marc Grant recognized Union Gas for their sponsorship of this woodlands restoration project. This is the third year Union Gas has supported the town’s Canopy Conservation program.

“Today’s event celebrates our community’s interest in creating an even cleaner, greener Oakville,” Councillor Grant said. “On behalf of Town Council I wish to thank Union Gas and all our planters today for your commitment to preserving our tree canopy.”

Volunteer planters included a large team of Sheridan College alumni.

Prior to the community planting, town staff planted six sizeable oak trees at the site. Councillor Grant along with Jalil Hashemi, acting manager, Forestry Services and Mark Egbedeyi-Emmanuel, Union Gas district manager for Hamilton/Halton pitched in to spread the last shovel of mulch.

“Environmental conservation is important to Union Gas and it’s a common goal we share with the Town of Oakville” said Mark Egbedeyi-Emmanuel. “The Canopy Conservation Program is an enormous benefit to the community and we’re excited to partner once again on this initiative.”

Last year, the town began removing dead and dying ash trees destroyed by EAB from the town’s woodlands to ensure public safety and to help the woodlands renew. While natural regeneration will account for most of the regrowth in the town’s woodlands, Shannon Creek Trail was identified as a prime site for restoration to help the forest regrow more rapidly with desirable native species. Earlier in the month, over 2,000 trees and shrubs were planted at Clearview Woods.

For more information, visit the Woodlands Hazard Abatement page.


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Oakville community digs in to plant trees at Shannon Creek Trail

Town continues to work with community partners to reduce coyote conflicts

Thursday, February 4, 2016 – for immediate release

Town continues to work with community partners to reduce coyote conflicts

Following a community open house held in January 2016 to address residents’ concerns about recent coyote sightings, the town has stepped up measures to help minimize human-coyote conflicts.

“There is an understandable concern when coyotes become habituated. There are a number of things we can all do that, if embraced by the entire community, can ensure a more peaceful coexistence with not just coyotes but all wildlife,” said Cindy Toth, director of Environmental Policy for the Town of Oakville.

Coyotes are typically not considered to be a significant risk to people, but intentional and unintentional feeding, tolerating them on our property, and allowing pets to roam freely contribute to coyotes losing their inhibitions and fear of people.

Since the public meeting on January 20, 2016, the town has:

posted additional coyote awareness signs in key areas where coyotes have been sighted;
installed wildlife-proof lids on town garbage bins in key areas, and continues to place lids on bins throughout the town;
sent notices to residents in key areas as a reminder to not dump household refuse or food waste in town bins, parks or trails as this encourages coyotes to frequent these areas;
increased park patrols to empty town garbage bins more frequently and monitor illegal dumping;
worked with Halton District School Board, Oakville Trafalgar High School and local property owners to help them address property standards issues and specific behaviours that may be contributing to increased coyote presence in the area;
collaborated with Oakvillegreen to provide coyote education sessions to Oakville school students and staff;
worked in partnership with HRPS to enforce town by-laws including littering, property standards, and dogs off leash;
continued to monitor coyote sightings through the town’s coyote reporting form and mapping feature to assist the Oakville & Milton Humane Society (OMHS) in locating problem coyotes.

OMHS and Halton Regional Police Services (HRPS) continue to patrol areas where coyotes are most visible to ensure safety and attempt to haze or capture problem, sick or injured animals.

Hazing is a method used to instill a fear of humans in coyotes and make your property unwelcome. This includes shouting, using noise makers, waving your arms aggressively, and throwing objects in the direction of the coyote, remembering the goal is to frighten, not harm the animal. Keeping garbage, compost, brush piles, pet food and bird feeders inaccessible also makes your property unattractive to a coyote.

The OMHS continues to respond to calls from the public and sightings reported through the town’s coyote reporting form. Residents can report a coyote sighting through the coyote reporting form page or discover where coyotes have been sighted on the coyote sightings map.

For more information on how to co-exist with wildlife, visit the coyote page.


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Last call for Oakville Community Spirit Award nominations

Tuesday, April 07, 2015 – for immediate release

Last call for Oakville Community Spirit Award nominations

Award nominations due Monday, April 13, 2015

Don’t miss your chance to showcase Oakville’s finest volunteers by nominating them for an Oakville Community Spirit Award! Nominations are due Monday, April 13, 2015, by 4 p.m.

Residents are encouraged to nominate a deserving resident in any of the eight award categories: Access, Arts, Environmental, Group Volunteer, Individual Volunteer, Heritage, Senior and Youth. The nomination process is quick and easy. Forms are available at all town facilities and Oakville Public Library branches, or submit online at oakville.ca.

This year’s annual Community Spirit Awards presentation will be held on Wednesday, June 3, 2015 at Oakville’s Queen Elizabeth Park Community and Cultural Centre (QEPCCC). The 2015 Community Spirit Awards will be designed by local ceramic artist and QEPCCC instructor Thomas J. Suh.

For more information about the Oakville Community Spirit Awards, its categories and nomination requirements, visit the Community Spirit Awards page.


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Last call for Oakville Community Spirit Award nominations

Nominations now open for Oakville’s 2015 Community Spirit Awards

Tuesday, March 03, 2015 – for immediate release

Nominations now open for Oakville’s 2015 Community Spirit Awards

Recipients to be honoured at celebration event on June 3, 2015

The Town of Oakville is once again honouring community champions who positively contribute to the life and spirit of the town. Nominations are now open for the 14th Annual Community Spirit Awards recognizing outstanding individuals, groups and businesses in eight categories.

“The Community Spirit Awards provides us with an opportunity to recognize a few of the many Oakville residents that contribute to Oakville’s livability,” said Mayor Rob Burton. “I encourage everyone to nominate and share the stories of those community champions who are truly making a difference in the community.”

Nominations will be accepted until Monday, April 13, 2015, at 4 p.m. in the following award categories:

Access Award, sponsored by MEDIchair Halton
Arts Award, sponsored by The Oakville Beaver
Environmental Award, sponsored by Tim Hortons
Group Volunteer Award, sponsored by the Town of Oakville
Heritage Award, sponsored by Genworth Financial Canada
Individual Volunteer Award, sponsored by Paradiso Restaurant
Senior Award, sponsored by Amica
Youth Award, sponsored by RBC Royal Bank

This year’s annual Community Spirit Awards presentation will be held on Wednesday, June 3, 2015, at Oakville’s Queen Elizabeth Park Community and Cultural Centre (QEPCCC). The 2015 Community Spirit Awards will be designed by local ceramic artist and QEPCCC instructor Thomas J. Suh.

Nomination forms are available at all town recreation facilities, Town Hall and Oakville Public Library branches, or can be completed online. For more information about Oakville’s Community Spirit Awards categories and nomination requirements, please visit the Community Spirit Awards page.


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Oakville first municipality in Ontario to achieve 3RCertified status for its Town Hall

Tuesday, December 23, 2014 – for immediate release

Oakville first municipality in Ontario to achieve 3RCertified status for its Town Hall

Recycling Council of Ontario and Deputy Minister of the Environment and Climate Change Paul Evans honoured Oakville with a Silver 3RCertified status for its leadership in waste reduction and diversion at its Town Hall building. Oakville is the first municipality to receive such an honour for a municipal building and one of only 16 buildings in Ontario that has achieved 3RCertified status.

“This silver status recognition speaks to the commitment on behalf of Council and staff to actively reduce and divert waste at the town,” Mayor Rob Burton said. “Thank you to everyone who works at and visits Town Hall and demonstrates their environmental consciousness by reducing, reusing and recycling.”

Oakville’s Town Hall was evaluated on the various ways an organization manages solid waste using pre-established criteria. Certification is awarded at one of four levels (Platinum, Gold, Silver or Bronze) based on the total number of points earned following detailed documentation review and a rigorous on-site, third-party evaluation.

3RCertified is a unique voluntary program, and the first of its kind in Canada for the Industrial, Commercial and Institutional sectors, that measures, reports, and improves waste reduction and recycling practices for businesses. The program aims to standardize and enhance waste minimization practices through a comprehensive analysis of the entire lifecycle of material management – from procurement to final destination.

For information on other Town of Oakville environmental programs visit the Environment page.


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Oakville first municipality in Ontario to achieve 3RCertified status for its Town Hall

Cottage Real Estate Transactions: Qs You Need to Ask

Do you represent clients who need to escape the urban commotion (read: they would like to buy a seasonal cottage or other similar property)? Seasonal cottages, or non-winterized structures used during the summer months, are the largest categories of recreational property. Other categories include winterized/year-round cottages/homes, country homes, chalets, and hobby farms.

Regardless of the type of recreational property, if you are involved in such a transaction, you will need to know the following:

•  rural/recreational planning

•  municipal regulations

•  environmental legislation (e.g., statutory requirements regarding the installation of wells and septic systems; permits to construct waterfront wharfs, docks, and boathouses)

Following is a list of environmental-type questions you should consider when representing a client in a cottage/recreational transaction. The last sections relate to legal matters, such as surveys, easements, and encroachments, and municipal regulations. This is not a comprehensive list.

Access – Road

Is the property accessible by road or by water?

If it’s accessible by road, what kind of road?

If it’s a private road – what is the cost for maintaining it?

Is there a driveway? If yes, is it mutual or private?

If it’s private, is the right of way deeded?

Access – Water Only

Is there parking?

Where are the launching facilities?

Is the water navigable?

Shoreline

Who owns the shoreline? Is it privately owned or owned by the government?

Are there any issues regarding the shoreline? (e.g., closing the shoreline road allowance, improvements to the shoreline, pending applications for shoreline improvement, disputes)

Are there any structures or docks on the shoreline allowance?

Waste Disposal

Is the property serviced by sewers or a septic system?

If the property is serviced by a septic system – what size/type? Where is it located? When was it last pumped?

Water Supply

What type of water system supplies the property? Drilled well? Dug well? Water line?

When was the last water sample conducted? What are the results?

Are there any water treatment devices on the property?

Are any water lines shared with adjoining properties?

What type of pumping system is there and where is it located?

Other Environmental

What is the acid sensitivity of the nearby water?

Is the property located within conservation authority jurisdiction?

Is the property near a designated flood plain?

Is the property subject to flooding?

Has there been any landfill activity on the property?

Title and Legal Matters

Is there a survey? (If not, consider asking for one.)

Are there easements or encroachments on the property?

Are there any legal restrictions or rights?

Are there any disputes concerning property boundaries and ownership of fences?

Do improvements made to the property (if any) encroach over the property line?

Zoning

Does the zoning confirm with local zoning bylaws?

Are there any building or zoning restrictions affecting the property?

Is the property subject to a site plan agreement?

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In your experience, which issue have you found to be the most worrisome?

 

 

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What’s happening at Town Hall — July 14 to 18, 2014

Friday, July 11, 2014 – for immediate release

What’s happening at Town Hall — July 14 to 18, 2014

Do you want to know what’s happening at Town Hall? Are you interested in participating in local government? Here’s a highlight of what’s happening July 14 to July 18, 2014.

July 14

Community Services Committee 
Location: Town Hall, Council Chamber, 7 to 10 p.m.

Consent items:
By-law 2014-067 – A by-law to stop up and close for all purposes a portion of Khalsa Gate, being Parts 1, 2, 5 and 6 on Plan 20R-19868
Oakville Historical Society Agreement
Burloak Drive Boundary Road Agreement with City of Burlington
By-law Amendment 2014-068 to By-law 1984-1 (The Traffic by-law)

Discussion items:
Specialized Transit Service Area
Request to Remove Town Tree – 2469 Yarmouth Crescent
Fence Encroachment on Town Lands
Bronte Village Parking
Strategies for Oakville’s Main Street Commercial Districts
Harbours Sediment Management Study
Harbours Feasibility and Capacity Study – Phase 1
Sixth Line from Dundas Street to Highway 407 ETR – Class Environmental Assessment Study
Environmental Strategic Plan – Implementation Update

Administrative Services Committee 
Location: Town Hall, Oakville and Trafalgar rooms, 7 to 10 p.m.

Consent items:
Tax Apportionments
Recreation and Culture Rates and Fees

Discussion items:
Operation of Construction Equipment – Prohibited Period of Time
Tow Truck Licensing Update
Canada Revenue Agency (CRA) HST Audit – Mitigation Strategies
Municipal Capital Facilities
Transitional Ice Storm Funding
Additional Funding and Consultant Assignment Extension for Contract Administration Services – North Service Road Extension
Accessibility Advisory Committee (May 8, 2014)

July 15

Site Plan Committee 
Location: Town Hall, Trafalgar Room, 5 to 7 p.m.

What’s happening at Town Hall provides an overview of upcoming Town of Oakville meetings and other events. The public is welcome to attend these meetings. For agendas and copies of reports, please visit the agendas and minutes page. For more information and additional upcoming meetings, please visit the Council calendar or news and notices page.

For more information

Kathy Patrick
Supervisor, Council and Committee Services
Town of Oakville
905-845-6601, ext. 4235
kpatrick@oakville.ca


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What’s happening at Town Hall — July 14 to 18, 2014

Town of Oakville says thanks at 13th Annual Community Spirit Awards

Thursday, June 12, 2014 – for immediate release

Town of Oakville says thanks at 13th Annual Community Spirit Awards

Nine individuals, groups and organizations honoured for outstanding contributions

Oakville’s outstanding volunteers were celebrated for their exemplary contributions to the community at the 13th Annual Community Spirit Awards held June 11, 2014, at Queen Elizabeth Park Community and Cultural Centre.

2014 Community Spirit Award recipients:

Adam Spencer, Access Award sponsored by MEDIchair Halton
Susan Forde, Arts Award sponsored by The Oakville Beaver
Bank of Montreal, Environmental Award sponsored by Tim Hortons
Friends of the Oakville Public Library, Group Volunteer Award sponsored by Sun Life Financial
Philip Brimacombe, Heritage and History Award sponsored by Genworth Financial Canada
Patricia Decker and Paul Doherty, Individual Volunteer Award sponsored by Paradiso Restaurant
Ruth Johnston, Senior Award sponsored by Chartwell Oakville
Children in Action, Youth Award sponsored by RBC Royal Bank

“On behalf of Council, thank you to all of our community champions — the award winners and their fellow nominees — for their inspiring commitment to improving the lives of others,” said Oakville Mayor Rob Burton. “The countless hours they’ve spent supporting important causes in our vibrant community is greatly appreciated.”

The Weather Network’s Chris Mei was the emcee for the evening, entertaining the audience while sponsors handed out the awards. Each recipient received a one-of-a-kind, intricately crafted and themed diorama by award-winning artist Soyeon Kim.

“This year’s awards are as special and unique as the individuals and groups who received them,” said Nina de Vaal, director of recreation and culture for the Town of Oakville. “The important attributes and the spirit of each award category and recipient have been captured beautifully in the art pieces by Soyeon Kim.”

Since 2002, Oakville’s Community Spirit Awards have recognized individuals and groups for their outstanding contributions to the community.

For more information visit the Oakville Community Spirit Awards page.


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Town of Oakville says thanks at 13th Annual Community Spirit Awards