OMB approves Bronte Green application for development of former Saw-Whet Golf Course lands

Thursday, July 6, 2017 – for immediate release

OMB approves Bronte Green application for development of former Saw-Whet Golf Course lands

Decision approves settlement negotiated last fall

The Ontario Municipal Board (OMB) has released its decision formally approving the negotiated settlement that was reached between the Town of Oakville, the Region of Halton, Conservation Halton and Bronte Green last fall concerning the development of the lands at 1401 Bronte Road.

“The OMB’s decision to approve the town’s settlement with Bronte Green was the best possible outcome that we could achieve at the OMB,” Mayor Burton said. “In the settlement, Bronte Green agreed to significant concessions to respond to all of the issues raised by the town including protecting green space and addressing key environmental concerns over wildlife and flood protection. While it would have been desirable to preserve all this land, legally that was simply not possible in this case.”

The approved development proposal permits Bronte Green to build a residential community with limited retail, and a mix of single family homes, townhouses and low-rise apartments located on Bronte Road. This proposed transit-friendly community will also include a school, parks and a trail system while preserving sensitive environmental lands that are critical habitat to endangered and other species of wildlife.

The town had opposed the original Bronte Green application as being premature and not in the public interest. This position was based on serious concerns with the draft plan and the underlying technical studies. The town engaged a team of 15 witnesses representing a variety of scientific and planning disciplines to put forth its case.

Following extensive negotiations, Bronte Green made significant changes to its original development proposal to reflect the concerns raised by the Town of Oakville, Region of Halton, Conservation Halton and the community. These changes included:

Dedicating a significant parcel of land to enhance the woodlands
Creating a high value habitat for species including snapping turtles.
Increasing the size of the buffer around the natural features from 10 to 30 metres in order to better protect the natural heritage system from the impacts of development and to reduce flood and erosion impacts.
Constructing storm water management systems which insure that there will be no additional risk of downstream flooding.
Removing the vehicular bridge previously proposed over the Fourteen Mile Creek which posed a threat to endangered species of fish.
Securing a permanent natural heritage linkage to Bronte Creek Provincial Park.
Reserving an elementary school site adjacent to a centrally located neighbourhood park.
Increasing density on portions of the site to support transit-friendly development along Bronte Road, and preserve more parkland

For more information visit the Bronte Green Corporation development application page.


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OMB approves Bronte Green application for development of former Saw-Whet Golf Course lands

OMB rules ClubLink’s development application for Glen Abbey complete

Thursday, June 22, 2017 – for immediate release

OMB rules ClubLink’s development application for Glen Abbey complete

Town must begin application review process despite Interim Control By-law remaining in effect

One month after the Ontario Municipal Board (OMB) decided that the town’s Interim Control By-law (ICBL) and its one year extension were appropriate and necessary to understand the implications of ClubLink’s proposed development at Glen Abbey, the OMB has decided on a separate motion that the Glen Abbey development application is complete as of the date of the Board’s Decision on June 7, 2017. Under the Planning Act, the town now has 120 days to consider and decide on the merits of the application for rezoning (October 5, 2017), and 180 days to consider and decide on the merits of the application for an official plan amendment (December 4, 2017) to permit the complete redevelopment of the Golf Course. If the town does not make a decision within this timeframe, ClubLink would be in a position to appeal its applications directly to the OMB for decision.

“Council is very disappointed that less than one month after a decision that recognized that the town’s comprehensive planning studies underway were valid and necessary given the magnitude of the Glen Abbey proposal, another Board decision says that we must accept development applications for processing,” Mayor Burton said. “No doubt our residents are confused by this decision, but the town will move forward to review the application within the timelines established under the Planning Act.”

Jane Clohecy, commissioner, Community Development noted that the town is still moving forward on the next steps required to implement the cultural heritage landscape assessments and urban structure review planning studies that were approved by Council on May 15, 2017 and June 12, 2017 respectively.

“While the town is disappointed with this latest decision, it does not change the fact that the town’s ICBL remains in place, and no substantive changes to the land use at Glen Abbey property can take place before the town’s planning studies have been completed,” Clohecy noted. “We fully anticipate using the results of the planning studies underway to assess the merits of the proposed redevelopment of the lands.”

ClubLink’s development proposal will now be reviewed through the town’s development review process in order to make a recommendation to Council within the Planning Act timelines. This process includes public notice and feedback on the applications:

ClubLink’s development application is now posted to the town’s website so that members of the public may register for official notices and provide feedback.
Signs will be posted on the perimeter of the golf course site shortly indicating that a development proposal has been submitted to the town.
A public information meeting will held in mid-July to help explain the application and to receive public comments.
A report outlining the staff recommendation to Council will be posted on the website prior to the application being considered by Council for review by the public.
Members of the public may provide feedback in writing or in person any time before a final decision is made by the Planning and Development Council.

For more information, visit our Interim Control By-law and Glen Abbey Development Planning Studies pages.


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OMB rules ClubLink’s development application for Glen Abbey complete

Council recognizes four significant cultural heritage landscapes in Oakville

Wednesday, May 17, 2017 – for immediate release

Council recognizes four significant cultural heritage landscapes in Oakville

$150,000 additional funding approved to undertake Phase Three: Implementation of Protection Measures

Council recognized four Oakville properties as significant cultural heritage landscapes at its Planning and Development Council meeting Monday night. The four properties are:

Raydor Estate/Glen Abbey at 1333 Dorval Drive
Bowbeer Farmstead at 1086 Burnamthorpe Road East
Hilton Farm at 2013 North Service Road West
Biggar Farm at 4243 Sixth Line

The four properties will now be subject to Phase Three implementation work led by town staff to identify and recommend to Council potential measures to safeguard the heritage attributes of these properties.

Council’s decision took into account advice from town heritage staff, detailed information, analysis and opinions provided by external experts led by Letourneau Heritage Consulting, as well as input from landowners, the Heritage Oakville Advisory Committee and the public.

“The expert assessments and the staff report were very convincing in identifying how the four properties met the criteria to be recognized as significant cultural heritage landscapes,” Mayor Burton said. “We look forward to hearing back from staff, the public and the landowners on how we can best protect the heritage importance of these properties moving forward.”

Council’s decision continues the implementation of the town’s Cultural Heritage Landscapes Strategy, endorsed by Council in January 2014. These four properties were identified as high priority sites for further study in the Phase One Cultural Heritage Landscape Inventory endorsed by Council in February 2016. Last night’s actions concluded Phase Two Cultural Heritage Landscape Assessments for these properties. Council approved $150,000 in additional funding for Phase Three, which will include assistance from independent experts. 1333 Dorval Drive (Glen Abbey Golf Course/RayDor Estate) remains a high priority for completion.

Council also approved a staff recommendation that no further action be taken as part of the Cultural Heritage Landscape Strategy on two other properties that had been identified as high priority sites in the Phase One Inventory, Rivaz Farm at 3367 Dundas Street West and the Van Sickle Farm at 3451 Tremaine Road. These properties, while not identified as significant cultural heritage landscapes, were identified to have significant built heritage resources that may warrant protection. Two other high priority properties which are owned by the town, Bronte Harbour (3014 Lakeshore Road West) and Bronte Bluffs (35 West River Street) will be subject to Phase Two assessments in the coming months.

A cultural heritage landscape is a geographical area of heritage significance that has been modified by human activities and is valued by a community for the important contribution they make to our understanding of the history of a place, an event, or a people. The Provincial Policy Statement requires that significant cultural heritage landscapes be conserved.

For more information visit our Cultural Heritage Landscapes strategy page.


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Town launches Switching Gears Transportation Master Plan Update

Tuesday, May 9, 2017 – for immediate release

Town launches Switching Gears Transportation Master Plan Update

Seeking public feedback on ensuring balanced and sustainable transportation options

As part of the scheduled update of its Switching Gears Transportation Master Plan (TMP), the Town of Oakville is seeking input from residents to help identify community transportation priorities from now until 2031.

“Our goal is to offer balanced, sustainable transportation options that make it even easier for people, goods, and services to move around Oakville,” said Mayor Rob Burton. “Switching Gears offers exceptionally detailed integration between Oakville’s land use and transportation planning. Now, we’re looking for public input to make sure we are focused on the community’s transportation priorities.”

Over the next few decades, the town expects to see increased traffic due to population and employment growth. That’s why the town is looking for responsible and effective ways to handle this growing demand by finding a balance for strategic road improvements with the need for greater range of transportation choices to reduce the number of vehicles on the road.

Building on the success of the town’s recent Active Transportation Master Plan update, Goods Movement Study and Pedestrian Safety Study, the 2017 TMP update will review the transportation network improvements focusing on future transit targets to accommodate growth to 2031, and provide input into the town’s upcoming Development Charge By-Law.

Public open house

To connect with residents, the town will be hosting a public open house on May 17 at Town Hall from 6 – 8 p.m. Drop-in and registration starts at 6 p.m. followed by a staff presentation and open house from 6:30 to 8 p.m.

Residents are also encouraged to submit comments and suggestions at tmp@oakville.ca or share their ideas on Facebook or Twitter.

Oakville’s TMP, Switching Gears (pdf) looks at all modes of transportation including public transit, walking, cycling and ride-sharing along with strategic roadway improvements to ensure the safe, convenient and efficient movement of people and goods. Launched in 2013, Switching Gears is the town’s guiding document for developing practical, sustainable, long-term plans to guide the town’s transportation system to meet the needs of its anticipated growth to 2031. It incorporates transportation, land use planning and financial strategy which respects the social, environmental and economic goals as defined in the Livable Oakville Plan, Halton’s Official Plan and Transportation Plan, and other provincial strategies.


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Town launches Switching Gears Transportation Master Plan Update

Town Council approves new private tree protection by-law

Tuesday, May 2, 2017 – for immediate release

Town achieves highest standard in performance data collection

ISO 37120 Platinum certification reflects commitment to transparency and innovation

Oakville joins the ranks of cities across the globe after receiving the prestigious ISO 37120 platinum certification, the world’s first international standard for sustainable cities, from the World Council on City Data (WCCD). Oakville is the fourth Ontario municipality to receive this designation, and is the first International Organization of Standardization (ISO) achievement for the town.

“This certification is a significant achievement for Oakville that reflects Council’s commitment to innovation and transparency as we work to create Canada’s most livable town,” Mayor Rob Burton said. “Our involvement with the WCCD will help us measure how well we’re meeting the needs of our citizens, track our progress over time and benchmark our performance against other world-class cities.”

ISO 37120 Sustainable Development of Communities: Indicators for City Services and Quality of Life is comprised of 100 performance indicators that track a city’s progress in delivering services and ensuring quality of life for its community. Platinum certification acknowledges that the town has achieved the highest standard in data collection and research to drive the delivery of high quality programs and services to the community.

As a global leader on standardized metrics, the WCCD manages the ISO 37120 certification system and Global Cities Registry that hosts data from approximately 40 cities around the world, to enable a municipality and its residents to compare its social, economic and environmental performance in relation to other cities. Data now available shows that Oakville is leading the way in areas including the number of higher education degrees per 100,000 population (about one in two citizens has a higher education degree), total electrical energy use per capita (Oakville is one of the most efficient communities) and total number of bike paths/lanes per 100,000 population (among the highest of cities worldwide).

There is a wide range of certification levels offered by the WCCD for cities to aspire to and levels are based on the number of indicators reported by the city. To achieve platinum certification, the highest level, the town provided data on over 90 indicators that was validated through a third-party verification process.

During her presentation to Council, Dr. Patricia McCarney, president and CEO of World Council on City Data, commended the town’s commitment open data and efforts to pursue certification. “It is my pleasure to welcome the Town of Oakville to the World Council on City Data as an ISO 37120 platinum certified municipality. The dedication of Mayor Burton, Town Council and staff to open, standardized and comparable city data will help to increase the quality of life for all citizens while driving evidence-based decision making and data driven solutions. The town stands out in Canada and globally as a leader in working to create a more smart, sustainable, resilient, inclusive and prosperous future for its residents.”

Quick Facts

The WCCD was founded in 2014 – ISO 37120 was piloted by 20 WCCD Foundation Cities throughout the world
Based on eight years of development by the Global City Indicators Facility and later the Global Cities Institute at the University of Toronto
ISO 37120 is the first ISO standard on cities
Comprises 100 indicators (54 core, 46 supporting) around 17 themes on city sustainability and quality of life

To view Oakville’s data and to learn more about ISO 37120, visit the World Council on City Data website. To learn more about the town’s commitment to open data, visit our Open Data page..


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Town Council approves new private tree protection by-law

Town achieves highest standard in performance data collection

Tuesday, May 2, 2017 – for immediate release

Town achieves highest standard in performance data collection

ISO 37120 Platinum certification reflects commitment to transparency and innovation

Oakville joins the ranks of cities across the globe after receiving the prestigious ISO 37120 platinum certification, the world’s first international standard for sustainable cities, from the World Council on City Data (WCCD). Oakville is the fourth Ontario municipality to receive this designation, and is the first International Organization of Standardization (ISO) achievement for the town.

“This certification is a significant achievement for Oakville that reflects Council’s commitment to innovation and transparency as we work to create Canada’s most livable town,” Mayor Rob Burton said. “Our involvement with the WCCD will help us measure how well we’re meeting the needs of our citizens, track our progress over time and benchmark our performance against other world-class cities.”

ISO 37120 Sustainable Development of Communities: Indicators for City Services and Quality of Life is comprised of 100 performance indicators that track a city’s progress in delivering services and ensuring quality of life for its community. Platinum certification acknowledges that the town has achieved the highest standard in data collection and research to drive the delivery of high quality programs and services to the community.

As a global leader on standardized metrics, the WCCD manages the ISO 37120 certification system and Global Cities Registry that hosts data from approximately 40 cities around the world, to enable a municipality and its residents to compare its social, economic and environmental performance in relation to other cities. Data now available shows that Oakville is leading the way in areas including the number of higher education degrees per 100,000 population (about one in two citizens has a higher education degree), total electrical energy use per capita (Oakville is one of the most efficient communities) and total number of bike paths/lanes per 100,000 population (among the highest of cities worldwide).

There is a wide range of certification levels offered by the WCCD for cities to aspire to and levels are based on the number of indicators reported by the city. To achieve platinum certification, the highest level, the town provided data on over 90 indicators that was validated through a third-party verification process.

During her presentation to Council, Dr. Patricia McCarney, president and CEO of World Council on City Data, commended the town’s commitment open data and efforts to pursue certification. “It is my pleasure to welcome the Town of Oakville to the World Council on City Data as an ISO 37120 platinum certified municipality. The dedication of Mayor Burton, Town Council and staff to open, standardized and comparable city data will help to increase the quality of life for all citizens while driving evidence-based decision making and data driven solutions. The town stands out in Canada and globally as a leader in working to create a more smart, sustainable, resilient, inclusive and prosperous future for its residents.”

Quick Facts

The WCCD was founded in 2014 – ISO 37120 was piloted by 20 WCCD Foundation Cities throughout the world
Based on eight years of development by the Global City Indicators Facility and later the Global Cities Institute at the University of Toronto
ISO 37120 is the first ISO standard on cities
Comprises 100 indicators (54 core, 46 supporting) around 17 themes on city sustainability and quality of life

To view Oakville’s data and to learn more about ISO 37120, visit the World Council on City Data website. To learn more about the town’s commitment to open data, visit our Open Data page..


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Town achieves highest standard in performance data collection

Council hears update on Glen Abbey Golf Course

Appeal of the town’s interim control by-law set to begin on January 30, 2017

Mayor Rob Burton convened a special meeting of Council on January 23, 2017, for Council and the public to receive an update from Planning and Legal staff on current matters related to the Glen Abbey Golf Course. Key issues discussed included the upcoming January 30, 2017 Ontario Municipal Board (OMB) hearing on Clublink’s appeal of the town’s interim control by-law, an update on key town studies underway, as well as the status of the proposed development application submitted by ClubLink on November 10, 2016.

“We need to build a shared understanding with the community of the complex issues surrounding the future of the Glen Abbey Golf Course site,” Mayor Burton said. “While the status of the town’s interim control by-law will be determined at the OMB, the town is still moving forward with the studies that will help us to better understand this property. We look forward to hearing from the public, the applicant and community stakeholders when these studies are brought forward to Council later this spring.”

The three studies that the town proposed to complete during the timeframe provided by the interim control by-law are:

An Urban Structure Review
A Land Use Economic and Impact Analysis Study, and
A Cultural Heritage Landscape Assessment of Glen Abbey Golf Course

Staff indicated that good progress is being made on all studies and that the draft results are expected to be presented to Council during spring 2017. It is anticipated that the implementation of the studies may then require further official plan and zoning by-law amendments and/or other implementation tools.

The town’s Director of Planning, Mark Simeoni, also updated Council on the status of ClubLink’s November 10, 2016 submission for an Official Plan amendment, a Zoning By-law amendment and a Plan of Subdivision to permit redevelopment of the Glen Abbey Golf Course property including 3,200 residential units, 121,000 square feet of new office and retail space and 32.47 hectares of natural heritage system.

Mr. Simeoni noted that the town had determined that the application was incomplete given it did not contain all of the information required by the town and ClubLink was advised of this decision on December 8, 2016. As a result, on December 12, 2016, ClubLink requested that the OMB hear a motion to determine the completeness of their application. The OMB has not yet set a date for the hearing of this motion.

Members of Council sought clarification from staff on the differences between the Glen Abbey and Saw Whet golf courses within the Livable Oakville Official Plan. Commissioner of Community Development Jane Clohecy noted that the site-specific Official Plan policies designating Saw Whet as an area of potential future growth do not exist for Glen Abbey.

“We appreciate the clarification from staff on the differences between Glen Abbey and Saw Whet within Oakville’s Official Plan,” said Mayor Burton. “All of this information is critical to understanding the process and purpose behind the three studies staff are currently undertaking.”

Mayor Burton went on to remind the audience that under the provincial Planning Act, members of Council cannot take a position on an application until all of the relevant information is presented to Council.

Town Solicitor Doug Carr further noted that the upcoming January 30, 2017 OMB hearing will only be considering issues related to ClubLink’s appeal of the town’s interim control by-law (2016-024) that was passed on February 1, 2016, and the one year by-law extension (2016-115) that was passed on November 1, 2016. The hearing will take place in the Trafalgar Room at Town Hall and members of the public are welcome to attend. Only those individuals and groups already registered as parties or participants may speak at the hearing.

For updates and background information on all of the issues related to Glen Abbey, or to review the January 23, 2017, meeting, visit the town’s Glen Abbey Information page.


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Council hears update on Glen Abbey Golf Course

Council approves group home registration by-law to support neighbourhood cohesion

Tuesday, December 13, 2016 – for immediate release

Council approves group home registration by-law to support neighbourhood cohesion

In an effort to facilitate neighbourhood communication and cohesion, Council passed a new by-law — Group Home Registration By-law 2016-11 — that will see the town collecting business names, ownership and contact details of group homes in Oakville. Under the new by-law, town municipal enforcement services staff can respond to community questions and concerns by connecting residents with the group home operators. This quick intervention often leads to better community understanding and cooperation.

“In recent years, Council and staff have heard a number of concerns regarding activities at local group homes. Resolving these issues proved difficult because we did not know where exactly these homes were, or how to contact their operator,” Mayor Rob Burton said. “Our new bylaw will provide staff with much needed contact information to encourage dialogue and resolutions between neighbours.”

Under the town’s bylaw, a group home business license application/renewal must include a business name, ownership and contact information. The annual application/renewal fee is $93. Ownership and contact information collected through the licensing process will not be shared without the consent of the group home operator but is subject to normal Municipal Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act requests.

A group home is defined as a supervised single housekeeping unit in a residential dwelling for the accommodation of three to10 persons, exclusive of staff, who by reason of their emotional, mental, social or physical condition or legal status, require a group living arrangement for their well-being

Although licensed by the Province, group homes are most often owned privately by a group home operator or a service agency subject to a service agreement. Service agreements outline responsibilities of group homes and may require the development of processes for dealing with resident concerns as well as inspections to ensure compliance with ministry standards including training of staff, documentation, files, interior maintenance of the home and overall safety.

According to the Municipal Act 2001, municipalities are only permitted to register a group home, but not regulate it. The town’s zoning by-law permits group homes in all residential zones, which is consistent with recent case law dealing with group home regulation.

For more information, review the staff report in the December 5, 2016 Administrative Services Committee agenda.


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Council approves group home registration by-law to support neighbourhood cohesion

Town Council approves one year extension to its Interim Control By-law that limits Glen Abbey Golf Course to its existing uses

Thursday, November 3, 2016 – for immediate release

Town Council approves one year extension to its Interim Control By-law that limits Glen Abbey Golf Course to its existing uses

Council voted unanimously at Planning and Development Council on November 1, 2016, to extend Interim Control By-law 2016-24 (ICB) that restricts the use of the Glen Abbey Golf Course to its existing uses for one additional year. The ICB was originally passed on February 1, 2016 and with a one-year extension, will now remain in effect up to and including January 31, 2018.

In the meeting, Mark H. Simeoni, director, Planning Services Department, updated Council on the status of the key planning studies underway and explained the town’s reasons for recommending an extension to the ICB.

The status of the key studies is outlined below:

Macaulay Shiomi Howson Ltd was hired as the lead consultant to undertake an Urban Structure Review. Preliminary work was reviewed at the Livable Oakville Sub-committee earlier this week. The draft of the study is expected in the spring of 2017 with public consultation, revisions if any, and implementation to follow as required.
PWC is completing a Land Use Economic and Impact Analysis study. The first draft of the study is expected to be complete in the spring of 2017 with public consultation, revisions if any, and implementation to follow as required.
Letourneau Heritage Consulting was recently engaged to complete the Phase 2 Cultural Heritage Landscapes assessment of the Glen Abbey Golf Course. The draft assessment is expected to be completed in the spring of 2017 with public consultation, revisions if any, and implementation to follow as required.

Section 38 of the Planning Act (Ont.) permits a municipality to pass an ICB for up to a year (with the right to extend the by-law for a further year) in order to complete a review or study of land use policies in the municipality.

Club Link, the owners of Glen Abbey, has appealed the town’s ICB to the Ontario Municipal Board (OMB). The hearing on this appeal is scheduled to begin on January 30, 2017 at Town Hall.

Review the February 1, 2016 and November 1, 2016 Council agendas and staff reports.


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Town Council approves one year extension to its Interim Control By-law that limits Glen Abbey Golf Course to its existing uses

Progress being made on the redevelopment of the former hospital site

Tuesday, October 25, 2016 – for immediate release

Progress being made on the redevelopment of the former hospital site

Learn more and provide input on new community centre at December 1, 2016 open house and consultation

Work on the town’s five-year redevelopment plans of the former hospital site is underway and residents are invited to attend an open house at Town Hall on December 1, 2016, from 5 to 7 p.m. to find out more about what’s been done so far and next steps.

In addition to the open house, members of the public are invited to participate in one of two consultation sessions to provide input into the new community centre proposed for the site. The sessions run from 3:30-5:30 p.m. or 7-9 p.m. at Town Hall.

“Council is pleased to see the excellent progress being made towards a new community centre, park and potential future housing on this site,” said Oakville Mayor Rob Burton. “It is gratifying for Council to see our extensive plans begin entering their third and final phase, and to continue exploring the opportunity for a unique community health hub in town.”

Last week, Council received a staff report indicating that public consultation would begin later this year for the new community centre’s amenities and activities. As part of the town’s Parks, Recreation and Library Facilities Master Plan the proposed amenities of the centre include an indoor pool (to replace Centennial Pool), gymnasium, youth space, active living space, multi-purpose space and community rooms. At the December 1, 2016, meeting, the town will be seeking input from the community and user groups to confirm these amenities prior to the start of design in 2017.

Since taking possession in April, a number of in-depth studies of the buildings and the land have been completed to better understand the site. The town has assessed the hospital buildings for hazardous materials and for any potential site contamination and planning for the demolition is underway. The town has completed structural assessments of the parking garage and the former Oakville Trafalgar High School (OTHS) – a designated heritage resource. Earlier this year the town also undertook public consultation on the on-street parking restrictions in the area and established a non-binding Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) between the town and the Mississauga Halton Local Health Integration Network (LHIN) regarding the potential concept of a community health hub in town.

The overall Former Hospital Site Project is divided into three phases. The town will be entering into Phase 3 (2017-2020), the final phase of this project, which is about reinventing the site. It involves demolishing the building, conducting a community needs assessment, determining the appropriate location for the centre and park, and developing a plan for potential housing on any remaining lands.

Demolition is anticipated to start in 2017 and take eight to12 months to complete. The development of the community centre will take three years to complete with an opening scheduled for September 2020.

For more information visit the Former Hospital Site project page.


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Progress being made on the redevelopment of the former hospital site