Taco Time in #BurlON

If you’re like us, any day is a good day for tacos. We are lucky…

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Taco Time in #BurlON

Modernize the Ontario Land Transfer Rebate

For many first-time buyers in Ontario, saving for a down payment is among the biggest obstacles to home ownership. The provincial land transfer tax (LTT) and other closing costs reduce the size of a buyer’s down payment, making it more difficult to enter the market.

Currently, first-time buyers are eligible for a maximum LTT rebate of up to $2,000. However, as home prices have increased, the rebate’s effectiveness has eroded over time.

In 1996, when the LTT rebate was introduced, Ontario’s first-time buyers paid $0 on the average priced home. The rationale behind the LTT rebate was to exempt first-time buyers in order to help them enter the market. Today, first-time buyers are paying nearly $4,000 in LTTs on an average priced home, after applying the rebate.

To improve the affordability of home ownership, the government should modernize the LTT rebate for first-time buyers. OREA is currently researching this important issue and will be making recommendations to the government in the very near future.

Original article – 

Modernize the Ontario Land Transfer Rebate

OREA’s Forms Guru Shares the Latest on Form #801, E-Signatures and Operating with Integrity 

This past fall it was my pleasure to participate in OREA’s EMERGE event tour to speak with REALTORS® about varied Standard Forms Updates, including Form #801, E-signatures and adding integrity to trading activity using Standard Forms & Clauses. Form #801 has garnered a lot of discussion and controversy. Members need to know about regulatory changes which can translate into essential changes in real estate activity, including the two regulatory changes resulting in the creation of Form #801: 

To not represent to anyone that an offer exists unless that offer is in writing; and
To retain a copy of all written offers or a summary document (such as Form #801) of all written offers.

Technology and e-signatures are now an integral part of the real estate landscape in Ontario. So OREA invited industry experts to EMERGE to talk about the benefits of this technology and what REALTORS® need to consider when they are choosing between the many options available. In my presentation, the minimum requirements according to the Electronic Commerce Act were discussed for members to keep in mind when choosing an e-signature provider. 

In this video you’ll get answers to many common questions about Form #801, e-signatures and integrity using forms. But don’t stop there – every month OREA will be releasing a new video featuring one of our EMERGE speakers. If you haven’t checked it out yet, last month’s video features Andrew Fogliatio discussing online lead funnels. Next month you’ll get to see the highlights from the consumer panel, which was by far the most talked about part of EMERGE. 

If you like what you see, be sure to attend this year’s EMERGE conference, running in six areas of the province between September 22 and November 17. The live events feature business ideas and technology tips from top experts in the field not available anywhere else. This is one of those memorable conferences with real benefits for your real estate business that you won’t want to miss.   

OREA members will receive further information about this year’s line up of speakers as well as how to register as it becomes available. In the mean time, check out our EMERGE landing page for key dates and more content from last year. On behalf of the team at OREA, we look forward to seeing you there! 

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OREA’s Forms Guru Shares the Latest on Form #801, E-Signatures and Operating with Integrity 

Sorry, your name again?

I’m pretty bad at remembering names. In fact, it’s a running joke here at OREA. It’s not that I don’t try, I just go blank when it comes to names. As leaders and professionals, however, the skill of remembering names is important and worth improving.

In order to get better at remembering names, I looked to the experts. The techniques I found are pretty consistent from expert to expert. I wanted to share the top ones with you here, on the off chance that this is a challenge for you as well.

Care to remember – The most important step is to make a conscious decision to remember names because you care about the people you meet. Remembering names shows people that they matter. This alone can have a huge impact as you put more effort into remembering.

Repeat – Use the person’s name soon after hearing it. “Where do you work, Sean?”, or “What attracted you to this seminar, Joan?”. Don’t over use it, but restating it a few times in the conversation will help to cement it in your memory.

Associate – This is the one technique that I struggle with the most. We’ve all heard people suggest that you associate someone’s name with something else, such as some feature of their face, or something that rhymes with their name. My problem is that I’m focusing on that rather than listening to the person, and I end up making a poor first impression. People who use this technique, however, often say it works very well.

Spell it – If someone has even a slightly unusual name, or one that can be spelled in different ways, ask the person to spell it. You might choose to write it down if appropriate. Spelling a name is another way to cement it into your memory. Of course, getting a business card allows you to make a few notes about the person.

Speak up – Sometimes you might want to just admit you’ve forgotten and ask for the person’s name. It’s really not that big of a deal. People will most likely understand, after all they may have forgotten your name as well! It’s much better to ask someone to repeat their name than it is to risk losing a good connection.

Link – 

Sorry, your name again?

OREA president featured on radio show

Ray Ferris, president of the Ontario Real Estate Association, will be the guest expert on a radio show starting this weekend. 

The show, “Ask the Experts”, is scheduled to run on Saturday, April 2 at 5 p.m. on Newstalk 1010 and is hosted by Iain Grant. This weekend’s show will introduce Ferris and OREA to the listening audience and aims to cover a variety of real estate questions and issues. The president will discuss the value that a REALTOR® brings to the real estate transaction, as well as answering questions from the host about real estate.

The one-hour radio program can be heard across the province at 1010 on the AM dial. Ferris is scheduled to appear on the show again in several subsequent interviews this spring and fall. His second interview is scheduled for Saturday, April 16 at 5:00 p.m. and will cover some of the less-well known ways that a REALTOR® can help the public during a real estate transaction.

“Ask the Experts” is a public radio show described on the station’s website, www.newstalk1010.com, as an opportunity for members of the public to “talk directly to the movers and shakers. You will get inside information and knowledge that you can’t get anywhere else. It’s a great way for you to get free advice on everything from plumbing to legal.”

If you have questions, comments or ideas for future real estate topics on the radio program, send an email to info@orea.com with the subject line “Radio program comments.”

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OREA president featured on radio show

OREA’s 2016 Government Relations Committee

OREA’s GR team would like to welcome this year’s Government Relations Committee.

Valerie Miles (Chair)
Roger Bouma
Glenda Brindle
Kevin Crigger
Henry David
Stacey Evoy
Amie Ferris
Janice Myers
Heidi Noel
Von Palmer
Robert Pfaff
Debbie Vernon
Sean Morrison
Anna Vozza

The committee helps identify legislative and regulatory issues that affect Ontario REALTORS® and the real estate industry. As experienced real estate professionals, the GRC is a valuable resource for policy makers since they can speak to the implications of proposed legislation.

The committee also plays an important role in building strong relationships with MPPs and public servants. In this role, they regularly attend meetings, MPP events and make presentations before legislative committees.

OREA’s GR team looks forward to working with the new committee.

Original article:

OREA’s 2016 Government Relations Committee

Introducing Ontario’s Top 2016 YPN Leaders

OREA is pleased to introduce it’s 2016 YPN Leadership Award winners. The recipients of this year’s awards are:

Bradley Mayer-Harman (Brampton Real Estate Board)

John-Ross Parks (Quinte & District Association of Realtors Inc.)

Peter Butler (Simcoe & District Real Estate Board)

Lindsay Reid (London & St. Thomas Association of Realtors); and

Einas Makki (Timmins, Cochrane & Timiskaming Districts Association of Realtors)

These five individuals are redefining what it means to be a real estate leader in the year 2016. They were selected from a large pool of candidates for their outstanding track records of progress in real estate and their communities. In the coming months OREA will be sharing their top lessons learned and ideas for taking real estate to the next level in a series of video interviews.

 The YPN Leadership Awards program is in its second year and is designed to recognize those new to the profession or under the age of 40 who: volunteer for organized real estate; give back to their communities; and invest in their professional development. The awards are presented each spring at OREA’s annual Leadership Conference.

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Introducing Ontario’s Top 2016 YPN Leaders

Tips to protect your home and property: IBC

The Insurance Bureau of Canada (IBC) reminds Ontarians to review their home insurance policies, update their home inventories and take steps to protect their personal property.

“Reviewing and updating your home inventory list helps protect your personal property and can speed up the claims process in the event of a theft or loss,” says Kim Donaldson, vice-president, Ontario, IBC. “Ontarians are encouraged to take a few moments to review the following important tips on how to help ensure a safe home for their families.”

IBC’s top ten tips:

  1. Review your insurance policy to ensure that you have adequate coverage.
  2. Shop around to find the right policy for your own unique situation.
  3. To prevent possible slips and falls, keep your walkways and front stairs clear of snow and ice.
  4. Create or review your family emergency plan.
  5. Update your home inventory list by adding new items, including gifts received over the holidays. Note the approximate value of the items, including makes, models, serial numbers and any other identifying marks.
  6. If necessary, hire an appraiser to determine the value of works of art or jewelry in order to avoid a possible claims misunderstanding.
  7. Take photos or a video of your home’s contents.
  8. Keep your home inventory list, and photos or video of your home’s contents in a safety deposit box, a fire proof safe or in another secure location away from your home.
  9. If you are renting, ensure you have tenant’s insurance. A landlord’s policy will not typically cover your personal belongings or liability.
  10. If you have questions, speak to your insurance representative.

For further information, contact IBC’s Consumer Information Centre at 1-844-227-5422 or visit www.ibc.ca.

Source – 

Tips to protect your home and property: IBC

Bring order to your meetings

There are few complaints I hear more from volunteers than those regarding poorly run meetings. REALTORS® share their precious time when they volunteer. They want that time to be productive, so when board or committee meetings get derailed, or run over time, or fail to accomplish their objectives, it’s frustrating for everyone.

Associations can dial down the frustration level by implementing meeting ground rules. These are rules or guidelines that the group agrees to abide by for every meeting.

Ground rules are especially important to the meeting chair. He or she uses these to help keep order, keep the group focused, reduce personal attacks and achieve better decisions.

But participants are the ones who really benefit. When you attend a meeting where ground rules are in place and followed, it’s a bit like paradise. People are listening to others, keeping an open mind, being respectful, contributing and staying on track. And meetings end on time and with positive results.

Now I’m not saying that meeting ground rules solve all meeting problems, but they do work very effectively to keep meeting attendees performing at their peak.

The chair can create the rules for their meetings, however, it’s better to involve the group in developing these rules. That’s especially true when meetings will be ongoing, such as board or committee meetings.

Here’s a sample to get you started.

PREPARE

Come prepared having reviewed your materials
Call ahead with technical or clarifying questions
Arrive on time & stay to the end

PARTICIPATE

Listen to others without interrupting
Show courtesy & respect – no side discussions
Respect the time allocated to agenda items
Listen to all facts without preconceived opinions

DISCUSS

Speak only when recognized by the chair
Everyone speaks once before others speak again
Don’t repeat what has already been said
Don’t feel you have to speak to an item
Disagree with ideas, not people

See the original article here – 

Bring order to your meetings

Private Members Bill Introduced on Home Inspector Licensing

On Monday, Trinity-Spadina MPP Han Dong ‎introduced a Private Member’s Bill that, if passed, would establish a home inspector licensing system in Ontario. Bill 165, the Licensed Home Inspectors Act, 2016, is based off of recommendations that came from the Ministry of Government and Consumer Services’ Home Inspector Qualifications Panel. OREA has been an active participant on the Ministry’s panel and we were supportive of the recommendations that came out of the consultations.

It is important to note that Private Member’s Bills are not a government bill and rarely become law. OREA has learned that the province still plans on bringing forward government sponsored legislation on the same issue.

In short, MPP Dong’s bill would allow the Ontario government to establish a delegated administrative authority that would be responsible for establishing education requirements and the licensing of home inspectors in Ontario.

The bill will have 2nd Reading debate on March 3rd, 2016. If the bill passes 2nd Reading, it would then need to go to Committee and pass 3rd Reading before becoming law.

OREA’s government relations team will continue to monitor Bill 165 as it moves through the legislative process.

This article – 

Private Members Bill Introduced on Home Inspector Licensing