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Toopy and Binoo to headline 2017 Oakville Children’s Festival

Fourth annual arts and culture celebration takes place at QEPCCC on July 9

Toopy and Binoo, the popular cat and mouse duo from the hit children’s television show, will headline the 2017 Oakville Children’s Festival on Sunday, July 9 from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. on the grounds of Queen Elizabeth Park Community and Cultural Centre (QEPCCC). Families across Oakville can dance and sing along to the theatrical production Toopy and Binoo: Fun and Games, as a toy chest full of games and puzzles ignite their curious imaginations.

The event will also feature performances by comedian and juggler Bob Cates, singer Mike Ford, Silk Acrobatic artist Heather Govender, KaHa:wi Dance Theatre’s Pow Wow Bootcamp, First Nations Storyteller Cheri Maracle, The Compound All Star Urban Dance Team, ROCKGarden Party, Toyland Puppet Show, and street magicians Ray Chance and Mike D’Urzo.

Celebrating Canada’s 150th anniversary is also part of the line-up with a special dance performed by Oakville’s Balletomane Inc. and an ArtHouse community mural that will transform the festival into a patriotic arts and culture playground for kids of all ages.

“The Oakville Children’s Festival is always a great event for families, and this year will be no exception,” said Mayor Rob Burton. “We’re always pleased to provide this great opportunity to celebrate Oakville’s arts and culture, especially as we commemorate Canada’s 150th anniversary.”

There will also be fun hands-on activities and interactive shows, Touch-A-Truck, City Parent Scavenger Hunt, Oakville Public Library storytimes, Friends of Library Book Sale, Sport Oakville Zone, archery, martial arts, YMCA of Oakville, face painting, and Monkeynastix. This year’s food features include the Kinsmen Club of Oakville BBQ lunch, plus many of the GTA’s most popular food trucks.

There is no parking on site and on-street parking restrictions will be enforced throughout the neighbourhood. Residents and out-of-town guests are encouraged to take the free Oakville Transit shuttle service from the Bronte GO Station. Free bike parking will also be available onsite.

The Oakville Children’s Festival committee is currently recruiting enthusiastic volunteers to help with this year’s festival. Apply online at oakville.ca or email ocfvolunteers@oakville.ca for details.

Due to rising lake levels and ongoing flooding at Coronation Park, the town is temporarily relocating the 2017 Oakville Children’s Festival to QEPCCC, located at 2302 Bridge Road. Festival admission is free and the event will take place rain or shine. Additional acts and activities will be announced as they are confirmed. Visit Oakville Children’s Festival page for event updates.


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Toopy and Binoo to headline 2017 Oakville Children’s Festival

Oakville Children’s Festival moves to QEPCCC due to flooding

Thursday, May 18, 2017 – for immediate release

Oakville Children’s Festival moves to QEPCCC due to flooding

High water levels also impacting event permits for lakeside parks

As a result of rising lake levels and ongoing flooding at Coronation Park, the Town of Oakville is relocating the 2017 Oakville Children’s Festival to the grounds of the Queen Elizabeth Park Community and Cultural Centre (QEPCCC) on Sunday, July 9 from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.

“We don’t expect lake levels to recede until mid-summer which means Coronation Park will likely experience more flooding in the coming weeks,” said Sarah Douglas-Murray, senior manager of Cultural Services. “Unfortunately there is not enough dry space in the park to accommodate all the festival activities and we’ve determined that QEPCCC offers the best alternative location.”

The move to QEPCCC, located at 2302 Bridge Road, will not impact the Oakville Children’s Festival line-up of free entertainment designed to encourage children and families to explore and discover arts and culture. All the event details including special guests, performances and activities will be announced early next week.

Wet conditions in Coronation Park, Bronte Heritage Park, Lions Valley Park and Gairloch Gardens have also impacted permitted events booked over the next few weeks such as wedding photo shoots and picnics. Town staff are working with permit holders to reschedule or relocate their events. While lakefront parks remain open and accessible to the public, some areas are cordoned off with caution tape or fencing due to ponding water and saturated ground conditions.

Canada Day celebrations will remain in Bronte Heritage Park. The town is working with the Bronte Business Improvement Association to make any necessary adjustments to activities that may be impacted by further flooding.

Residents are encouraged to our Oakville Children’s Festival page for the latest updates on closures or contact ServiceOakville at 905-845-6601 or ServiceOakville@oakville.ca.


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Oakville Children’s Festival moves to QEPCCC due to flooding

Council recognizes four significant cultural heritage landscapes in Oakville

Wednesday, May 17, 2017 – for immediate release

Council recognizes four significant cultural heritage landscapes in Oakville

$150,000 additional funding approved to undertake Phase Three: Implementation of Protection Measures

Council recognized four Oakville properties as significant cultural heritage landscapes at its Planning and Development Council meeting Monday night. The four properties are:

Raydor Estate/Glen Abbey at 1333 Dorval Drive
Bowbeer Farmstead at 1086 Burnamthorpe Road East
Hilton Farm at 2013 North Service Road West
Biggar Farm at 4243 Sixth Line

The four properties will now be subject to Phase Three implementation work led by town staff to identify and recommend to Council potential measures to safeguard the heritage attributes of these properties.

Council’s decision took into account advice from town heritage staff, detailed information, analysis and opinions provided by external experts led by Letourneau Heritage Consulting, as well as input from landowners, the Heritage Oakville Advisory Committee and the public.

“The expert assessments and the staff report were very convincing in identifying how the four properties met the criteria to be recognized as significant cultural heritage landscapes,” Mayor Burton said. “We look forward to hearing back from staff, the public and the landowners on how we can best protect the heritage importance of these properties moving forward.”

Council’s decision continues the implementation of the town’s Cultural Heritage Landscapes Strategy, endorsed by Council in January 2014. These four properties were identified as high priority sites for further study in the Phase One Cultural Heritage Landscape Inventory endorsed by Council in February 2016. Last night’s actions concluded Phase Two Cultural Heritage Landscape Assessments for these properties. Council approved $150,000 in additional funding for Phase Three, which will include assistance from independent experts. 1333 Dorval Drive (Glen Abbey Golf Course/RayDor Estate) remains a high priority for completion.

Council also approved a staff recommendation that no further action be taken as part of the Cultural Heritage Landscape Strategy on two other properties that had been identified as high priority sites in the Phase One Inventory, Rivaz Farm at 3367 Dundas Street West and the Van Sickle Farm at 3451 Tremaine Road. These properties, while not identified as significant cultural heritage landscapes, were identified to have significant built heritage resources that may warrant protection. Two other high priority properties which are owned by the town, Bronte Harbour (3014 Lakeshore Road West) and Bronte Bluffs (35 West River Street) will be subject to Phase Two assessments in the coming months.

A cultural heritage landscape is a geographical area of heritage significance that has been modified by human activities and is valued by a community for the important contribution they make to our understanding of the history of a place, an event, or a people. The Provincial Policy Statement requires that significant cultural heritage landscapes be conserved.

For more information visit our Cultural Heritage Landscapes strategy page.


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Council recognizes four significant cultural heritage landscapes in Oakville

Participate in Clean Sweep this Friday and help keep Oakville beautiful!

Wednesday, April 19, 2017 – for immediate release

Participate in Clean Sweep this Friday and help keep Oakville beautiful!

Oakville participating in #CleanCanadaTogether challenge

The Town of Oakville’s annual Clean Sweep is set for this Friday, April 21, 2017. The popular event is a great way to get together with friends and family to clean up around your school, business, neighbourhood or park. Your 20 minutes makes a big difference in keeping Oakville beautiful!

To recognize Canada’s 150th anniversary, Oakville will compete against Brockville, Edmonton, Hamilton, Mississauga, Nova Scotia, Toronto, Vancouver, Vaughan and Winnipeg to see who can clean up the most litter. Participants are encouraged to share photos of their cleanup on social media using #CleanCanadaTogether.

Register online to get your free bags courtesy of GLAD, along with gloves to help with your cleanup. Make sure to choose your pickup location and date, and your supplies will be ready for you at one of the following locations:

Town Hall, 1225 Trafalgar Road
Iroquois Ridge Community Centre, 1051 Glenashton Drive
Glen Abbey Community Centre, 1415 Third Line
River Oaks Community Centre, 2400 Sixth Line
Sixteen Mile Sports Complex, 3070 Neyagawa Boulevard
Queen Elizabeth Park Cultural and Community Centre, 2302 Bridge Road

You may place your GLAD garbage bags out on your regular garbage collection day, and please recycle what you can. Please ensure that you use the clearly marked GLAD garbage bags to collect litter on Clean Sweep day as only these GLAD bags will be collected by Halton Region free of charge above the three-bag limit.

The Oakville Clean Sweep event kicks off Earth Week. Residents are also encouraged to take part in the town-wide Annual Earth Week Clean Up on Saturday, April 22 from 9–11 a.m. hosted by the Oakville Community Centre for Peace, Ecology and Human Rights (OCCPEH). For more information on cleanup site locations or to register contact OCCPEH at 905-849-5501, info@oakvillepeacecentre.org or visit www.oakvillepeacecentre.org.

For more information ways we’re helping to keep Oakville clean and green, visit our Oakville Clean Sweep page.


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Participate in Clean Sweep this Friday and help keep Oakville beautiful!

Downtown Plan moving forward

Tuesday, February 14, 2017 – for immediate release

Downtown Plan moving forward

Council-approved Lakeshore Road streetscape furniture will showcase downtown’s historic character

The revitalization of Lakeshore Road took a big step forward last night when Council approved the bridge railing, the lighting and the furniture selections (streetlight poles, benches, bollards, bike rings) for downtown Oakville.

“Thanks to public input we have streetscape furniture and materials that truly reflects what our residents want to see in Oakville’s historic downtown,” said Oakville Mayor Rob Burton. “We look forward to creating a vibrant Lakeshore Road that showcases the best of Oakville’s livability, history and distinct character.”

Community input has been vital throughout the Lakeshore Road East Reconstruction and Streetscape Project. After extensive public consultation both in-person and on-line, a traditional style of streetscape furniture was approved by Council on October 3, 2016, and specific furniture pieces were selected by residents’ and businesses in December.

With Council’s approval last night, staff will begin incorporating the selections into the Lakeshore Road Reconstruction and Streetscape Project, slated to start in 2019, and into the overall Downtown Transportation and Streetscape (DTS) Master Plan for other roads in downtown as they are reconstructed. The new curbs and pavers will be included in the new construction of Lakeshore Road Bridge at Sixteen Mile Creek which is expected to be completed in December 2017. Staff have also reported to the Heritage Oakville Advisory Committee and requested a heritage permit for the furnishings.

It should be noted that the town’s standard for LED fixture colour temperature is 4000K. With town’s public outreach resulting in a clear preference for 3000K for the streetlights within the historic downtown commercial district, Council approved staff’s recommendation to retrofit 3000K LED fixtures on existing decorative poles in the town’s other commercial districts – Kerr Village and Bronte Village. In addition, while there was clear preference for the existing streetlight pole and acorn fixture styles, staff will be reporting back to Council during the final engineering design phase on the costs of refurbishing the existing poles and retrofitting the LED fixtures, or installing new poles to match the existing styles.

Moving forward, staff will continue to work on developing options for a flexible/curbless look for Lakeshore Road and will launch a separate public engagement process this spring with a report due back to Council later in the year.

Background

The Downtown Plan, launched in December 2013, is comprised of the Downtown Cultural Hub Study (DCH), and the Downtown Transportation and Streetscape Study (DTS).

The DTS was approved by Council in April 2015. This study assessed the current traffic and roadway conditions in downtown Oakville and created recommendations to enhance the roadways, beautify streets, improve pedestrian/cycle ways and revitalize the Towne Square, by introducing design standards as well as increasing connectivity, mobility and accessibility. In November 2015 Council approved the timing for the Lakeshore Road Reconstruction and Streetscape Project to commence in 2019 and be completed over a two year period. In addition, the Lakeshore Road Bridge over Sixteen Mile Creek is now closed for reconstruction and will reopen in December 2017.


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Downtown Plan moving forward

Town Council approves one year extension to its Interim Control By-law that limits Glen Abbey Golf Course to its existing uses

Thursday, November 3, 2016 – for immediate release

Town Council approves one year extension to its Interim Control By-law that limits Glen Abbey Golf Course to its existing uses

Council voted unanimously at Planning and Development Council on November 1, 2016, to extend Interim Control By-law 2016-24 (ICB) that restricts the use of the Glen Abbey Golf Course to its existing uses for one additional year. The ICB was originally passed on February 1, 2016 and with a one-year extension, will now remain in effect up to and including January 31, 2018.

In the meeting, Mark H. Simeoni, director, Planning Services Department, updated Council on the status of the key planning studies underway and explained the town’s reasons for recommending an extension to the ICB.

The status of the key studies is outlined below:

Macaulay Shiomi Howson Ltd was hired as the lead consultant to undertake an Urban Structure Review. Preliminary work was reviewed at the Livable Oakville Sub-committee earlier this week. The draft of the study is expected in the spring of 2017 with public consultation, revisions if any, and implementation to follow as required.
PWC is completing a Land Use Economic and Impact Analysis study. The first draft of the study is expected to be complete in the spring of 2017 with public consultation, revisions if any, and implementation to follow as required.
Letourneau Heritage Consulting was recently engaged to complete the Phase 2 Cultural Heritage Landscapes assessment of the Glen Abbey Golf Course. The draft assessment is expected to be completed in the spring of 2017 with public consultation, revisions if any, and implementation to follow as required.

Section 38 of the Planning Act (Ont.) permits a municipality to pass an ICB for up to a year (with the right to extend the by-law for a further year) in order to complete a review or study of land use policies in the municipality.

Club Link, the owners of Glen Abbey, has appealed the town’s ICB to the Ontario Municipal Board (OMB). The hearing on this appeal is scheduled to begin on January 30, 2017 at Town Hall.

Review the February 1, 2016 and November 1, 2016 Council agendas and staff reports.


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Town Council approves one year extension to its Interim Control By-law that limits Glen Abbey Golf Course to its existing uses

Musical Moments outdoor piano project kicks off on August 15, 2016

Tuesday, August 9, 2016 – for immediate release

Musical Moments outdoor piano project kicks off on August 15, 2016

Oakville residents and visitors are invited to create their own musical moment by playing a tune on brightly-coloured pianos popping up in various outdoor locations from August 15 to 31, 2016.

The town’s Musical Moments project, in partnership with Merriam Music, is a simple and creative way for the community to engage with arts and culture while showcasing their own musical talent.

Six pianos, painted by Oakville youth attending summer camps and the Oakville Children’s Festival, will be placed at Towne Square, Westwood Park, Coronation Park, Bronte Village, and Glen Abbey and Iroquois Ridge community centres.

Piano players of all ages and abilities are encouraged to share a video of their musical performance on Merriam Music’s Facebook page, using #OakvilleMakesMusic for a chance to win great prizes. The contest runs from August 15 to 31, 2016.

Musical Moments is part of the Town of Oakville’s Summer Cultural Connection events series. Visit the Summer Cultural Connection page for more information.


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Musical Moments outdoor piano project kicks off on August 15, 2016

Get creative in Bronte and paint the lake for a chance to win

Friday, July 22, 2016 – for immediate release

Get creative in Bronte and paint the lake for a chance to win

Art contest will be part of Bronte Lake Walk on August 4, 2016

Calling all budding and professional artists, as well as those who just like to get creative! Oakville residents are invited to showcase their artistic talent at the Paint the Lake event on Thursday, August 4, 2016, from 4 to 8 p.m. at Bronte Heritage Park located at 2340 Ontario Street.

Offered as part of the town’s Summer Cultural Connection events series, Paint the Lake will take place in conjunction with the Bronte Lake Walk. Participants will choose a picturesque scene of Bronte Harbour and create their own masterpiece for a chance to win great prizes. Paint supplies and canvases will be provided while supplies last.

Each painting will be shared on the Bronte Village Facebook page where people can like their favourite. Prizes will be awarded in four categories: Kids (10 and under), Youth (11-17), Adult (18+) and Professional. The contest runs from August 5 to 12, 2016.

Paint the Lake is offered in partnership with the Bronte Village Business Improvement Association (BIA). Visit the Summer Cultural Connection page for more information.


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Get creative in Bronte and paint the lake for a chance to win

Town of Oakville and partners celebrate Bronte Bluffs restoration

The town celebrated the completion of a bioswale project at Bronte Bluffs today with community partners Conservation Halton, Bronte BIA, Bronte Historical Society, Bronte Horticultural Society, Oakvillegreen, Evergreen, and Amec Foster Wheeler. The bioswale is part of ongoing work by the town and community partners to restore and protect the area’s ecological health. Since 2014, a number of public events have been held to remove invasive plants and reintroduce native species.

“The bioswale in Bronte Bluffs is an excellent example of the innovative measures we can take to manage stormwater and reduce our ecological impact,” said Mayor Rob Burton. “Thanks to the work of our many partners within the community we are able to make Bronte a more livable, sustainable community.”

A bioswale is one of the many techniques associated with Low Impact Development (LID) and provides a natural way of dealing with stormwater. It is constructed of layers of engineered soil and specially selected plants that absorb water and filter out pollutants from urban runoff.

When rainwater flows down paved streets or other hard surfaces, it picks up chemicals, waste and bacteria which run into ditches and storm drain systems and eventually into our waterways. The bioswale lets water gradually soak through the plant and soil-based filters like a sponge, helping to cleanse the water before it enters the lake, while helping to reduce erosion.

Rain gardens, permeable paving and rain barrels are examples of LID techniques that residents can use at home.

The bioswale is a pilot project and was completed with support from the Great Lakes Guardian Community Fund. As part of Ontario’s Great Lakes Strategy, the Great Lakes Guardian Community Fund was set up to help people take action to protect and restore their corner of the Great Lakes by protecting water quality for human and ecological health; improving wetlands, beaches and coastal areas; and protecting habitats and species.

Other restoration projects at the Bronte Bluffs include:

enhanced habitat and restored quality of the site’s tableland forest through the removal of invasive species, particularly garlic mustard, and replanting with native plants
removing a direct outfall pipe into the lake and reducing erosion by planting native grasses and deeper rooted shrubs
planting native wildflowers and plants that support pollinators such as bees and butterflies
installing educational signage on Low Impact Development and protecting water quality on Lake Ontario

The work also provides a more enjoyable and safer experience for those using the waterfront trail.

Bronte Bluffs is an elevated, forested park that overlooks Bronte Harbour and Lake Ontario. It has been identified as a potential Cultural Heritage Landscape under the Ontario Heritage Act. Popular with cyclists and hikers, the Bronte Bluffs offers a variety of environmental, cultural and recreational pursuits.

Bronte Historical Society, which operates Sovereign House on the site, is currently featuring an exhibit on the history of the bluffs, Bronte Bluffs Then and Now, including information on the most recent work that has been done. Sovereign House is open to the public from 1-4 p.m. on Wednesdays, Saturdays and Sundays.

For information on Sovereign House and events, visit the Bronte Historical Society website.

For information on upcoming planting or invasive removal events, visit the OakvilleGreen website.

For information on the Bronte Bluffs cultural heritage landscape, visit the Cultural Heritage Landscape Strategy page.


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Town of Oakville and partners celebrate Bronte Bluffs restoration