Councillor Adams appointed chair of 2018 Budget Committee

Town plans for continued inflation level tax increases

At the inaugural 2018 Budget Committee meeting on June 26, 2017, Councillor Tom Adams was appointed as Oakville’s budget chair for the tenth consecutive year. Councillor Adams holds his Master’s in Business Administration from McMaster University and is a former senior risk manager to one of Canada’s major financial institutions.

Oakville is committed to offering valued services and programs to residents and making strategic investments in community priorities. Each year the town’s budget is one of the most important tasks facing Town Council, who have directed staff to prepare a budget that keeps the overall tax increase in line with inflation. The target for 2018 has been set at an overall property tax increase of 1.8 per cent, including the town, Regional and educational shares of the property tax bill.

Key budget pressures outlined by Nancy Sully, deputy treasurer and director, Financial Planning, include $1.4 million to implement the increased minimum wage announced recently by the Province, and $1.3 million in costs related to growth in the town including the operation of new transit vehicles, the cost to maintain new parks and roads, as well as costs associated with operating the new Trafalgar Park Community Centre (redeveloped Oakville Arena) and a proposed library.

The town will be looking at transforming the way services are delivered in order to respond to budget pressures in 2019 and 2020 relating to Trafalgar Park and the opening of the Southeast Community Centre (on the former hospital lands), a new fire station in Palermo, as well as other funding needs. Council has directed staff to keep overall property tax increases in line with inflation in both 2019 and 2020.

“The town is at the point where we must move beyond simple cost containment measures to keep tax increases at the rate of inflation in future years,” said CAO Ray Green. “Council, staff and the community will need to work together to set priorities, and look for opportunities to transform the way we deliver services.”

Green recommended a comprehensive reshaping of the organization that will enable the town to meet the overall budget target set by Council and create a longer-term vision for the financial sustainability of town operations.

“Oakville is recognized as having the healthiest finances in Ontario, and keeping those finances strong and secure is a key part of Council’s vision to make Oakville the most livable town in Canada,” said Mayor Rob Burton. “Staff have made us aware of potential pressures on the horizon, and recommended we take proactive steps to address them. We are confident that taking early action will help assure the long-term health of Oakville’s finances.”

Staff noted that the 2018 budget documents would be released on November 21, 2017. Staff will present the Budget Committee with an overview of the proposed 2018 operating and capital budgets, including opportunities for potential savings or increased revenues. The Budget Committee will hear input from pubic delegations before making a recommendation on December 12, 2017 to Council. Final Council approval of the operating and capital budgets is scheduled for December 18, 2017.

“Our key focus for this budget is to meet our goal of keeping overall property tax increases in line with inflation, while building and renewing infrastructure and maintaining high quality services for the community,” Councillor Adams said. “Public input is a critical piece of our annual budget process and I look forward to engaging with residents over the next few months.”

For more information, access the staff report included in the June 26, 2017 Budget Committee meeting agenda or visit the 2018 Budget page.


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Councillor Adams appointed chair of 2018 Budget Committee

2017 Budget Committee recommends 1.99 per cent overall tax increase

Budget goes to Council for approval on Monday, December 12, 2016

Achieving Council’s direction to keep the overall property tax increase in line with inflation, Oakville’s 2017 Budget Committee recommended a 3.21 per cent increase to the town’s portion of the tax bill, which produces an overall increase of 1.99 per cent when the expected Halton Region increase and educational components are included. The latest Toronto Consumer Price Index shows an annual increase of 2.3 per cent. If approved by Council, the proposed change would increase residential property taxes by $16.48 per $100,000 of assessment, meaning that the owner of a home assessed at $700,000 would pay an additional $115.36 per year or $2.22 per week. The recommendation will go before Council for approval on Monday, December 12, 2016.

“The recommended budget reflects Council’s commitment to keep overall property tax increases in line with inflation,” Budget Committee Chair Tom Adams said. “Council is doing this at the same time it is investing in building and renewing community infrastructure. We also continue to deliver high quality programs and services, while making strategic improvements desired by the community.”

In the town’s Draft 2017 Budget, staff is recommending a $310 million operating budget to provide a wide range of programs and services including the maintenance of roads and community facilities, fire services, transit, parks and trails, recreation and culture, senior services, and libraries, along with a variety of other valued services. Program enhancements recommended for 2017 include improvements to by-law enforcement, implementation of changes to the private tree by-law to strengthen tree protection, additional funding of $50,000 for Visit Oakville tourism, $90,000 to support the Heritage Grant program and an additional $52,500 to support cultural programs and grants.

The Budget Committee recommended referring additional funding for introducing flashing 40 kilometre-per-hour traffic zone warning signs to the 2018 budget process. This was to permit time to review potential new rules that could allow the limited use of photo radar in school zones before making any further decisions. The committee also recommended re-allocating existing funds for Council’s town-wide newsletter to more ward-specific communications.

In November, the Budget Committee reviewed the town’s Draft 2017 Capital Budget which includes $122.3 million in funding in 2017 and just over $1 billion for capital projects between 2017-2026 with a focus on transportation, infrastructure renewal and other elements related to growth. The Budget Committee recommended moving forward an additional $500,000 in road resurfacing projects to 2017.

Some of the key capital projects for 2017 include:

Trafalgar Park revitalization – $13 M
Lakeshore Road Bridge at Sixteen Mile Creek reconstruction – $10.5 M
Road Resurfacing and Preservation Program – $9.1 M
Former Oakville-Trafalgar Memorial Hospital demolition – $7.6 M
Phase 2 of LED streetlight conversion – $6.6 M
Kerr Street widening and grade separation – $4.7 M
Expansion buses – $4.3 M
Speers Road widening from the GO Station west of Third Line to Fourth Line – $4 M
Emerald Ash Borer Management Program – $3.7 M

Councillor Adams also noted in today’s deliberations that staff are directed to prepare future budgets for 2018, 2019 and 2020 to align with Council’s existing direction to keep overall property tax increases in line with inflation.

“Council is committed to ensuring Oakville’s finances remain strong, stable and healthy as we work to make our town the most livable town in Canada,” Mayor Rob Burton said. “The recommended budget reflects this commitment and ensures long-term stability for our property taxes.”

Residents who wish to appear before Council as a delegate at the December 12 meeting may register in person at the meeting, or in advance by emailing townclerk@oakville.ca or calling 905-815-6015. For those who cannot attend the meetings, they are streamed live on the town’s YouTube channel.

If you would like to attend a meeting and have any accessibility needs please email townclerk@oakville.ca or 905-815-6015 or fill out the accessible online feedback form.

For more details, visit the 2017 Budget page.


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2017 Budget Committee recommends 1.99 per cent overall tax increase

Town to strengthen private tree protection by-law

Wednesday, October 19, 2016 – for immediate release

Town to strengthen private tree protection by-law

New guidelines address need for canopy conservation in Oakville

Oakville’s tree canopy received a significant boost on October 17, 2016, as Council voted to amend the town’s private tree protection by-law in an effort to curb the unnecessary removal of healthy trees. The changes mean that property owners who wish to remove a private tree will require a permit and may also be required to plant a new tree on their property.

“Oakville’s tree canopy is a community asset, and Council is committed to protecting and enhancing it wherever possible,” said Mayor Rob Burton. “Thanks to considerable public input, improvements to the by-law will ensure we continue towards our 40 per cent canopy coverage goal and create an even cleaner, greener Oakville.”

Under the revised by-law, any tree 15 centimetres diameter at breast height (dbh) and above to be removed from private property is required to have a permit and payment of the applicable fee. In addition, any healthy tree above 15 centimetres dbh removed from private property must be replaced.

The Private Tree Protection By-law 2008-156 was adopted by Council in 2008 to support a greener community and a healthier environment as set out in the Livable Oakville Plan. It allowed property owners to remove a limited number of trees between 20 centimetres dbh and 76 centimetres dbh through a notification process and without permit.

“While the town’s tree canopy is threatened by invasive pests such as Emerald Ash Borer (EAB) and extreme weather, a significant amount of healthy trees are being removed through the current notification process and it does not encourage replanting to compensate for the loss,” said Chris Mark, director, Parks and Open Space. “The new permit process will respect homeowners’ desire to make home and landscaping improvements, but will encourage them to do so in an environmentally responsible manner,”

Pending Budget Committee approval in December, staff will present the revised private tree protection by-law to Council for final approval in early 2017.

For more information, visit the private tree protection page.


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Town to strengthen private tree protection by-law

Town proposing new road safety measures

Wednesday, May 4, 2016 – for immediate release

Town proposing new road safety measures

Public supports lower speed limits and other traffic calming methods

Town Council approved a proposal on May 2, 2016 to lower speed limits on select town roads and introduce an expanded traffic calming program. The plan comes after extensive research and public consultation on ways to curb speeding and support a safer environment in residential areas.

“Making sure our roads are safe for both vehicles and pedestrians is always a priority,” said Mayor Rob Burton. “Traffic calming will continue to be an important way in which we enhance the quality of our neighbourhoods and continue on our road to creating a more livable Oakville.”

In a report presented to Council, town staff recommended lowering the speed limit to 40 kilometres per hour on roadways alongside all schools, including secondary and private schools, as well as seniors’ centres, community centres, arenas, and libraries.

Last year, the town undertook a traffic calming and speed limit review, which included a survey of residents, after the Ministry of Transportation Ontario asked municipalities to consider lowering the default speed limit on municipal roads. Currently, all roads within Oakville have a default speed limit of 50 kilometres per hour unless posted otherwise, as set out by the Highway Traffic Act. Roadways posted at lower limits – i.e. 40 kilometres per hour – have been limited to roads primarily within elementary school zones.

“Results from our extensive research and review indicate that lowering the speed limit town wide is not necessary. A more practical and effective solution is to expand the use of 40 kilometre per hour speed zones to other areas that have high pedestrian traffic,” said Dan Cozzi, director, Engineering and Construction department.

Council directed staff to report back to the Budget Committee on timing and costs to implement the lower speeds as well as expand the traffic calming program to include Radar Speed Display Signs (RSDS). RSDS are the signs that indicate your speed as you approach them. Staff is proposing to install 12 RSDS units in areas that have been identified as having consistent speeding issues. According to a 2014 and 2015 pilot project the signs are effective in decreasing speeds by up to seven kilometres per hour.

RSDS were chosen by survey respondents, as one of the most preferred options of traffic calming measures, along with raised crosswalks and passive traffic calming techniques such as line markings and signage.

The town is also developing a Pedestrian Safety Program to establish where and what type of pedestrian crossings are needed throughout town.

For more information, review the April 25, 2016, Community Services Committee meeting staff report.


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Town proposing new road safety measures

Education Begins With A Needs Analysis

All education must begin with a needs analysis. We must deliver what the students need to perform and apply the requisite knowledge and skills in an ethical and professional manner. Adult education is not intended to correct shortages in motivation, remedy personal inadequacies, or alter deficient value systems. These are the purview of Dr. Phil, Judge Judy, and even the Jerry Springer of this world—entertainment, assuredly, but not education.

“Under promise and over deliver” is a conservative, self-rationalization for getting by and avoiding creativity. Although the tenet may have merit in some aspects of life, it is anathema when it comes to modern instructional and curriculum design.  Here we need to get rid of the ‘box’, not just think outside of it.

In education, let’s not dwell on constraints. Let’s focus on what is it learners need to know and imagine the most creative design for achieving that end. We can always temper our creation later with discussions of budget and available resources. After paring down (using the KISS process) is complete, our objective and anticipated learning should remain intact. Probably the most important thread to weave in this entire exercise is to make the content realistic so students grasp how the content relates to their out-of-class behaviour and performance.

In curriculum creation, content rules. Content is merely a grouping of a multiplicity of tasks. Each task must be specific, measurable, actionable, realistic, and time-sensitive (SMART). As for the facilitator, ensure that you deploy instructional techniques that lead to practical, informative, learning by ‘doing’, student-centric educational experiences.

 

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Education Begins With A Needs Analysis

Council approves 2.79 per cent increase to town portion of tax bill; 1.7 per cent increase to total property tax

Tuesday, March 31, 2015 – for immediate release

Council approves 2.79 per cent increase to town portion of tax bill; 1.7 per cent increase to total property tax

Meeting its commitment to keep the total property tax increase in line with inflation, Oakville Council unanimously approved a 2.79 per cent increase to the town’s portion of the tax bill for an overall property tax increase of 1.7 per cent. This means that residential property taxes would increase by $14.88 per $100,000 of assessment, meaning a home assessed at $400,000 would pay an additional $59.52 per year or $1.14 per week.

Council also approved that the overall property tax increases for 2016-2018 be in line with inflation.

“Council has once again honoured its commitment to its residents to provide the programs, services and infrastructure support expected by our community,” Mayor Rob Burton said. “By using performance-based budgeting, otherwise known as PB2, we’re controlling costs to drive the efficient delivery of our programs and services.”

The increase to the town’s portion of the tax bill includes a 1.63 per cent increase for the costs of providing town programs and services, and a 1.16 per cent increase in funding for infrastructure renewal.
The approved $461 million combined budget for the town’s operating and capital requirements will provide over 60 wide ranging programs and services including winter road maintenance, parks and trails, harbours, transit, emergency services, recreation and culture, senior services, libraries, and keep the town’s roads and other infrastructure in a state of good repair. Some of the top capital projects in this year’s budget are:

$7.1 million for road resurfacing and preservation
$5.9 million for reconstruction of the Rebecca Street Bridge
$5.3 million for reconstruction of Sixth Line north of Dundas Street
$3.9 million for the town’s Emerald Ash Borer Management Program
$2.9 million for the replacement of old Oakville Transit buses
$2 million for improvements to portions of the North Service Road
$1.8 million for Bronte Harbour dredging
$1.8 million for improvements to Speers Road
$1.7 million for west shore landscape rehabilitation at Sixteen Mile Creek
$1.7 million to replace aging roads and works equipment
$975,000 for design and preliminary work towards the rehabilitation of Oakville Arena

“We are investing in our infrastructure by renewing it at the same rate that it depreciates, and maintaining the high quality programs and services our residents want,” Budget Chair Councillor Tom Adams said. “We have kept our promise to keep tax increases in line with inflation and our overall 1.7 per cent increase is lower than the increases of our neighbouring municipalities, including Toronto. This is a responsible and proactive budget and I’m extremely proud of the hard work that went into it.”

For more details on the 2015 Budget visit 2015 Budget page.


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Council approves 2.79 per cent increase to town portion of tax bill; 1.7 per cent increase to total property tax

What’s happening at Town Hall — March 30 to April 3, 2015

Friday, March 27, 2015 – for immediate release

What’s happening at Town Hall — March 30 to April 3, 2015

Do you want to know what’s happening at Town Hall? Are you interested in participating in local government? Here’s a highlight of what’s happening March 30 to April 3, 2015.

March 30

Council 
Location: Town Hall, Council Chamber, 7–10 p.m.

Discussion items:
Former Public Works site 2264, 2274 and 2320 Trafalgar Road
Terry Fox Day
July 2015 – Oakville’s Month of Sport
Age-friendly Community Planning Grant application requirements

Standing committee report:
2015 Budget Committee (March 5, 2015)
2015 Budget Committee (March 11, 2015)
2015 Budget Committee (March 23, 2015)
Community Services Committee ( March 23, 2015)
Administrative Services Committee (March 23, 2015)

March 31

Heritage Oakville Advisory Committee
Location: Town Hall, Palermo Room, 9:30 a.m.-noon

What’s happening at Town Hall provides an overview of upcoming Town of Oakville meetings and other events. The public is welcome to attend these meetings. For agendas and copies of reports, please visit the agendas and minutes page. For more information and additional upcoming meetings, please visit the Council calendar or news and notices page.

For more information

Kathy Patrick
Supervisor, Council and Committee Services
Town of Oakville
905-845-6601, ext. 4235
kathy.patrick@oakville.ca


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What’s happening at Town Hall — March 30 to April 3, 2015

What’s happening at Town Hall — March 23 to 27, 2015

Friday, March 20, 2015 – for immediate release

What’s happening at Town Hall — March 23 to 27, 2015

Do you want to know what’s happening at Town Hall? Are you interested in participating in local government? Here’s a highlight of what’s happening March 23 to 27, 2015.

March 23

2015 Budget Committee
Location: Town Hall, Council Chamber, 9:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.

Additional information requested from Budget Committee on March 5, 2015
Budget deliberations

Community Services Committee
Location: Town Hall, Bronte and Palermo Rooms, 7 to 10 p.m.

Consent items
By-law 2015-025 – a by-law to dedicate certain land as part of a public highway (Part of Lots 7, 8, 9 and 10, Plan 785 – Speers Road)
By-law 2015-026 – a by-law to stop up and close for all purposes a portion of the unnamed street as shown on Plan 62, being Parts 1 and 2 on Plan 20R-18462
Open Burning By-law update

Discussion items
Health Protection Air Quality By-law and air quality initiatives update
Consideration of on-street parking along Hays Boulevard
2015 Active Transportation Capital Program

Administrative Services Committee
Location: Town Hall, Oakville and Trafalgar Rooms, 7 to 10 p.m.

Consent items
Northshore Boatworks Ltd. Lease – Bronte Marina Building
Application to conduct charitable lottery events – Boxer Rescue Ontario, Oakville

Discussion items
Oakville Library Governance
2014 Year End financial results and surplus disposition
Citizen appointments to the Accessibility Advisory Committee (AAC) and approval of the ACC Terms of Reference
Property standards and re-inspection fees

Advisory Committee Minutes
Accessibility Advisory Committee – January 8, 2015

March 24

Active Transportation Master Plan update workshop 
Location: Town Hall, Oakville and Trafalgar Rooms, 6:30 – 9 p.m.

Committee of Adjustment
Location: Town Hall, Council Chambers, 7 – 10 p.m.

March 27

Appeals Committee 
Location: Town Hall, Palermo Room, 9:30 – 11:30 a.m.

What’s happening at Town Hall provides an overview of upcoming Town of Oakville meetings and other events. The public is welcome to attend these meetings. For agendas and copies of reports, please visit the agendas and minutes page. For more information and additional upcoming meetings, please visit the Council calendar or news and notices page.

For more information

Kathy Patrick
Supervisor, Council and Committee Services
Town of Oakville
905-845-6601, ext. 4235
kathy.patrick@oakville.ca


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What’s happening at Town Hall — March 23 to 27, 2015

What’s happening at Town Hall — March 9 to 13, 2015

Friday, March 06, 2015 – for immediate release

What’s happening at Town Hall — March 9 to 13, 2015

Do you want to know what’s happening at Town Hall? Are you interested in participating in local government? Here’s a highlight of what’s happening March 9 to 13, 2015.

March 9

Planning and Development Council 
Location: Town Hall, Council Chamber, 7 to 10 p.m.

Consent items
Partial Release of Agreement H376822 and Partial Release of Easement H376829 – Westbury International (1991) Corporation
Subdivision Agreement – Upper Middle Road GP Inc. (Carterra) – 1455 Joshuas Creek Drive 24T-12002 and By-law 2015-013

Public hearing items
Public Meeting and Recommendation Report – Draft Plan of Condominium, Fernbrook Homes (Dorval) Limited, 160-222 Dorval Drive, 219-267 Hanover Street, 253-291 Rebecca Street, 262 Military Way, 270, 271 & 276 Ortona Gate, 275 & 281 Tudor Avenue
Public Meeting and Recommendation Report – Housekeeping and Technical Corrections Zoning By-law Amendment

Discussion items
Recommendation Report – Draft Plan of Condominium, Peppergate Developments Inc., 2420 Baronwood Drive
Notice of Intention to Demolish – 573 Lakeshore Road West
First and Second Street Heritage Conservation District Study
Economic Development Strategy Progress Report
Economic Development 2014 Annual Report
Parkland Dedication – Ontario Municipal Board Decision Regarding Richmond Hill Parkland Policies

Advisory Committee Minutes
Heritage Oakville Advisory Committee (February 24, 2015)

March 10

Planning and Development Council 
Reconvening of the Planning and Development Council Meeting of March 9, 2015
Location: Town Hall, Council Chamber, 7 to 10 p.m.

Discussion items
Downtown Transportation and Streetscape Study – Final Study Report
Downtown Parking Garage Feasibility Study
Downtown Cultural Hub Update

Site Plan Committee
Location: Town Hall, Oakville and Trafalgar Rooms, 5 to 7 p.m.

March 11

2015 Budget Committee
Location: Town Hall, Council Chamber, 9:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.

Discussion item
2015 Budget Committee Delegations

2015 Budget Committee
Location: Town Hall, Council Chamber, 7 to 10 p.m.

Discussion item
2015 Budget Committee Delegations

March 12

Accessibility Advisory Committee 
Location: Town Hall, Palermo Room, 7 to 9 p.m.

What’s happening at Town Hall provides an overview of upcoming Town of Oakville meetings and other events. The public is welcome to attend these meetings. For agendas and copies of reports, please visit the agendas and minutes page. For more information and additional upcoming meetings, please visit the Council calendar or news and notices page.

For more information

Kathy Patrick
Supervisor, Council and Committee Services
Town of Oakville
905-845-6601, ext. 4235
kathy.patrick@oakville.ca


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What’s happening at Town Hall — March 9 to 13, 2015

What’s happening at Town Hall — March 2 to 6, 2015

Friday, February 27, 2015 – for immediate release

What’s happening at Town Hall — March 2 to 6, 2015

Do you want to know what’s happening at Town Hall? Are you interested in participating in local government? Here’s a highlight of what’s happening March 2 to 6, 2015.

March 3

2015 Budget Open House 
Location: Iroquois Ridge Community Centre, 7 to 8 p.m.

Public information meeting  for Proposed Official Plan Amendment and Zoning By-law Amendment at 165 Charnwood Drive 
Location: St. Cuthberts Anglican Church, 1541 Oakhill Drive, 7 p.m.

March 5

2015 Budget Committee
Location: Town Hall, Council Chamber, 9:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.

Oakville Public Library Board
Location: Town Hall, Trafalgar Room, 7 to 10 p.m.

What’s happening at Town Hall provides an overview of upcoming Town of Oakville meetings and other events. The public is welcome to attend these meetings. For agendas and copies of reports, please visit the agendas and minutes page. For more information and additional upcoming meetings, please visit the Council calendar or news and notices page.

For more information

Kathy Patrick
Supervisor, Council and Committee Services
Town of Oakville
905-845-6601, ext. 4235
kathy.patrick@oakville.ca


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What’s happening at Town Hall — March 2 to 6, 2015