OMB rules ClubLink’s development application for Glen Abbey complete

Thursday, June 22, 2017 – for immediate release

OMB rules ClubLink’s development application for Glen Abbey complete

Town must begin application review process despite Interim Control By-law remaining in effect

One month after the Ontario Municipal Board (OMB) decided that the town’s Interim Control By-law (ICBL) and its one year extension were appropriate and necessary to understand the implications of ClubLink’s proposed development at Glen Abbey, the OMB has decided on a separate motion that the Glen Abbey development application is complete as of the date of the Board’s Decision on June 7, 2017. Under the Planning Act, the town now has 120 days to consider and decide on the merits of the application for rezoning (October 5, 2017), and 180 days to consider and decide on the merits of the application for an official plan amendment (December 4, 2017) to permit the complete redevelopment of the Golf Course. If the town does not make a decision within this timeframe, ClubLink would be in a position to appeal its applications directly to the OMB for decision.

“Council is very disappointed that less than one month after a decision that recognized that the town’s comprehensive planning studies underway were valid and necessary given the magnitude of the Glen Abbey proposal, another Board decision says that we must accept development applications for processing,” Mayor Burton said. “No doubt our residents are confused by this decision, but the town will move forward to review the application within the timelines established under the Planning Act.”

Jane Clohecy, commissioner, Community Development noted that the town is still moving forward on the next steps required to implement the cultural heritage landscape assessments and urban structure review planning studies that were approved by Council on May 15, 2017 and June 12, 2017 respectively.

“While the town is disappointed with this latest decision, it does not change the fact that the town’s ICBL remains in place, and no substantive changes to the land use at Glen Abbey property can take place before the town’s planning studies have been completed,” Clohecy noted. “We fully anticipate using the results of the planning studies underway to assess the merits of the proposed redevelopment of the lands.”

ClubLink’s development proposal will now be reviewed through the town’s development review process in order to make a recommendation to Council within the Planning Act timelines. This process includes public notice and feedback on the applications:

ClubLink’s development application is now posted to the town’s website so that members of the public may register for official notices and provide feedback.
Signs will be posted on the perimeter of the golf course site shortly indicating that a development proposal has been submitted to the town.
A public information meeting will held in mid-July to help explain the application and to receive public comments.
A report outlining the staff recommendation to Council will be posted on the website prior to the application being considered by Council for review by the public.
Members of the public may provide feedback in writing or in person any time before a final decision is made by the Planning and Development Council.

For more information, visit our Interim Control By-law and Glen Abbey Development Planning Studies pages.


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OMB rules ClubLink’s development application for Glen Abbey complete

OMB upholds Town’s Interim Control By-law regarding Glen Abbey

Thursday, May 11, 2017 – for immediate release

OMB upholds Town’s Interim Control By-law regarding Glen Abbey

The Ontario Municipal Board has rejected ClubLink’s appeal by upholding the town’s Interim Control By-law (ICBL) and its one year extension, concluding that the ICBL was appropriate and necessary. The Board’s decision noted that the town’s ICBL was based on a legitimate planning rationale, was enacted in good faith, and was in conformity with the Region of Halton Official Plan and the Provincial Growth Plan.

“Council is very pleased that the Board recognized that the magnitude of the Glen Abbey proposal and its potential for impact on the community warrant further study,” Mayor Burton said. “Our Livable Oakville Official Plan specifically identifies suitable growth areas in order to protect the character of our stable residential neighbourhoods and Council looks forward to hearing the results of the town’s studies.”

The OMB’s decision ensures the town will have sufficient time to complete its studies on the Glen Abbey property. Staff will be reporting to Council over the next month on all three studies. Any further work directed by Council as a result of the studies is expected to be completed before the ICBL expires on February 1, 2018.

Upcoming meeting dates are:

  1. Urban Structure Review

Livable Oakville Subcommittee, Town Hall, May 15, 1 p.m.
Public information meetings, Town Hall, May 30, 1:30 to 3:30 and 6:30 to 8:30 p.m.
Planning and Development Council, Town Hall, June 12, 7 p.m.

  1. Cultural Heritage Landscapes

Phase 2 reports for the high priority sites, including Glen Abbey, went to Heritage Oakville Advisory Committee on April 25
Planning and Development Council, Town Hall, May 15, 7p.m.

  1. Land Use Economic and Impact Analysis

Planning and Development Council, Town Hall, June 12, 7 p.m.

Members of the public are invited to attend these upcoming meetings. To register as a delegate to speak at the Planning and Development Council meetings, please call 905-815-6015 or email townclerk@oakville.ca by noon the day of the meeting.

The ICBL, originally passed on February 1, 2016 with a one-year extension, will now remain in effect up to January 31, 2018. Section 38 of the Planning Act (Ont.) permits a municipality to pass an ICBL for up to a year (with the right to extend the by-law for a further year) in order to complete a review or study of land use policies in the municipality.

For more information, review the summary of the decision on the Interim Control By-law page.


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OMB upholds Town’s Interim Control By-law regarding Glen Abbey

Settlement Reached in OMB Case with Bronte Green

Tuesday, November 15, 2016 – for immediate release

Settlement Reached in OMB Case with Bronte Green

Almost 85 hectares of Merton Lands to be protected as natural heritage system

The town has reached a settlement with Bronte Green over its development proposal for 1401 Bronte Road that includes significant concessions from Bronte Green to respond to concerns raised by the town and the public. The revised plan represents a significant change from the original proposal for the property by protecting over 10 hectares of green space and addressing key environmental concerns over wildlife protection. This is 4.25 hectares more than the original plan. The settlement must still be approved by the Ontario Municipal Board (OMB).

“The settlement reflects Council’s commitment to protect environmentally sensitive lands across Oakville,” said Oakville Mayor Rob Burton. “This was a victory for the town on every issue before the OMB. We have saved 80 per cent of the Merton Lands.”

The settlement permits Bronte Green to build a residential community with limited retail, and a mix of single family homes, townhouses and low-rise apartments located on Bronte Road. This proposed transit-friendly community will also include a school, parks and a trail system while preserving sensitive environmental lands that are critical habitat to endangered and other species of wildlife.

Bronte Green made significant changes to its original development proposal to reflect town and community concerns.

As a result of the settlement, Bronte Green will:

Dedicate a significant parcel of land to enhance the woodlands.
Create a high value habitat for species including snapping turtles.
Increase the size of the buffer around the natural features from 10 metres to 30 metres in order to better protect the natural heritage system from the impacts of development and to reduce flood and erosion impacts.
Construct storm water management systems which insure that there will be no additional risk of downstream flooding.
Remove the vehicular bridge previously proposed over the Fourteen Mile Creek which posed a threat to endangered species of fish.
Secure a permanent natural heritage linkage to Bronte Creek Provincial Park.
Reserve an elementary school site adjacent to a centrally located neighbourhood park.

The settlement has been endorsed by the Region of Halton, Conservation Authority and the Halton District School Board.

The OMB began hearing evidence on the settlement on Monday, November 14, 2016 and will continue to hear from other parties and participants on scheduled dates over the next two weeks.

For more information, please visit the Bronte Green Corporation – 1401 Bronte Road development application page.


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Settlement Reached in OMB Case with Bronte Green

Town Council approves one year extension to its Interim Control By-law that limits Glen Abbey Golf Course to its existing uses

Thursday, November 3, 2016 – for immediate release

Town Council approves one year extension to its Interim Control By-law that limits Glen Abbey Golf Course to its existing uses

Council voted unanimously at Planning and Development Council on November 1, 2016, to extend Interim Control By-law 2016-24 (ICB) that restricts the use of the Glen Abbey Golf Course to its existing uses for one additional year. The ICB was originally passed on February 1, 2016 and with a one-year extension, will now remain in effect up to and including January 31, 2018.

In the meeting, Mark H. Simeoni, director, Planning Services Department, updated Council on the status of the key planning studies underway and explained the town’s reasons for recommending an extension to the ICB.

The status of the key studies is outlined below:

Macaulay Shiomi Howson Ltd was hired as the lead consultant to undertake an Urban Structure Review. Preliminary work was reviewed at the Livable Oakville Sub-committee earlier this week. The draft of the study is expected in the spring of 2017 with public consultation, revisions if any, and implementation to follow as required.
PWC is completing a Land Use Economic and Impact Analysis study. The first draft of the study is expected to be complete in the spring of 2017 with public consultation, revisions if any, and implementation to follow as required.
Letourneau Heritage Consulting was recently engaged to complete the Phase 2 Cultural Heritage Landscapes assessment of the Glen Abbey Golf Course. The draft assessment is expected to be completed in the spring of 2017 with public consultation, revisions if any, and implementation to follow as required.

Section 38 of the Planning Act (Ont.) permits a municipality to pass an ICB for up to a year (with the right to extend the by-law for a further year) in order to complete a review or study of land use policies in the municipality.

Club Link, the owners of Glen Abbey, has appealed the town’s ICB to the Ontario Municipal Board (OMB). The hearing on this appeal is scheduled to begin on January 30, 2017 at Town Hall.

Review the February 1, 2016 and November 1, 2016 Council agendas and staff reports.


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Town Council approves one year extension to its Interim Control By-law that limits Glen Abbey Golf Course to its existing uses

Council votes to adopt business case to explore creation of a Municipal Development Corporation

Wednesday, June 29, 2016 – for immediate release

Council votes to adopt business case to explore creation of a Municipal Development Corporation

Town to seek public input on business case

At the June 27, 2016, Council meeting, Council voted to adopt a business case outlining the key rationale for the creation of a Municipal Development Corporation (MDC) to oversee development of the town’s former public works site on Trafalgar Road. Next steps include public consultation to gather feedback on the business case, which will be included in a final recommendation report, together with financial requirements and other steps needed to create a MDC for Council consideration.

“Our research has laid the groundwork to further explore the possible benefits the MDC option could have for residents,” Mayor Rob Burton said. “Before we make a final decision, Council will take the time to review all the additional information, public feedback and other detailed requirements we’ve asked staff to present.”

Increasingly, governments are considering a “master developer” approach to dealing with significant public surplus lands in order to manage development and maximize value to the community. Local governments can implement this approach when dealing with real estate opportunities by using in house staff or by establishing a MDC pursuant to the provisions of the Municipal Act, 2001.

In 2015, the town retained N. Barry Lyon Consultants Limited (NBLC), Exp Energy Services Limited, and Black, Sutherland LLP to conduct a study on the development potential of the town’s former public works yard. The study recommended that the town assume the role of “master developer” to oversee planning and development activities for the lands. On February 1, 2016, Council endorsed the study’s conclusions and directed staff to have the consulting team explore approaches to implementing the master developer recommendation.

The key rationale for the creation of a MDC are:

the ability to negotiate effectively in the market outside of the political system;
to clearly separate the roles and mandate of town staff; and,
to separate the town’s statutory approval role from the town’s role in land development.

The business case also outlines that the MDC would operate within Town Hall but independently of other town staff, and would be managed by a part-time CEO under the direction of a Board of Directors (chaired by the Mayor), with the support of a senior management advisory team.

Should the town decide in the future to establish a MDC, it could also be used to deal with other surplus lands, including the former Brantwood School site.

For more information, review the June 20, 2016 Administrative Services Committee meeting agenda.


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Council votes to adopt business case to explore creation of a Municipal Development Corporation

Council receives public input on proposed apartment building in Bronte

Wednesday, March 23, 2016 – for immediate release

Council receives public input on proposed apartment building in Bronte

Staff recommendation coming to Council once Bronte Growth Area Review is complete

A number of residents provided feedback to Council and staff on Monday, March 21, 2016, regarding Official Plan Amendment and Zoning By-law Amendment applications by Symgine (Lake East) Inc. for 2266 Lakeshore Road West and 83 East Street in Bronte Village. The purpose of the meeting was to gather public input prior to staff putting forth a recommendation to Council.

“Public input is always critical for Council when making community decisions,” said Mayor Rob Burton. “We continue to welcome additional feedback leading up to Council’s consideration of the staff recommendation.”

Symgine’s applications submitted on November 24, 2015, proposes a mixed use apartment building up to 20 storeys in height containing 144 units with retail and service commercial uses at ground level. The town’s Official Plan — Livable Oakville Plan, permits a four storey building with the potential of two additional storeys.

Public concerns raised pertained to building height and design, shadowing, increased traffic, pedestrian safety, parking, parkland dedication, infrastructure capacity, viability of proposed commercial space and construction management.

Residents also questioned why advertising was up at the property when the application wasn’t approved. The signage on the hoarding on the property did not comply with the Town of Oakville’s sign bylaw and was removed. The applicant is permitted however to advertise and promote the proposed building through other means prior to its approval.

As part of the Town of Oakville’s process, once the planning application was received in November 2015 a public meeting was held in January 2016 where almost 100 residents came out to provide input. The staff report introduced Members of Council to the application and included the feedback received at the January meeting, as well as a number of written comments sent to the town. Monday’s Council meeting served as a statutory public meeting to give residents a chance to provide additional feedback, ask questions and seek clarification on the application.

Once the Official Plan Review of the Bronte Growth Area is sufficiently completed and public feedback thoroughly reviewed a staff recommendation on the application is anticipated to go to Council for consideration in May.

The Livable Oakville Plan was approved by the Ontario Municipal Board in May 2011 and is consistent with the Provincial Policy Statement and conforms to the Provincial Growth Plan for the Greater Golden Horseshoe.

To read the staff report, review the March 21, 2016, Planning and Development Council agenda.


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Council receives public input on proposed apartment building in Bronte

Introducing Ontario’s Top 2016 YPN Leaders

OREA is pleased to introduce it’s 2016 YPN Leadership Award winners. The recipients of this year’s awards are:

Bradley Mayer-Harman (Brampton Real Estate Board)

John-Ross Parks (Quinte & District Association of Realtors Inc.)

Peter Butler (Simcoe & District Real Estate Board)

Lindsay Reid (London & St. Thomas Association of Realtors); and

Einas Makki (Timmins, Cochrane & Timiskaming Districts Association of Realtors)

These five individuals are redefining what it means to be a real estate leader in the year 2016. They were selected from a large pool of candidates for their outstanding track records of progress in real estate and their communities. In the coming months OREA will be sharing their top lessons learned and ideas for taking real estate to the next level in a series of video interviews.

 The YPN Leadership Awards program is in its second year and is designed to recognize those new to the profession or under the age of 40 who: volunteer for organized real estate; give back to their communities; and invest in their professional development. The awards are presented each spring at OREA’s annual Leadership Conference.

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Introducing Ontario’s Top 2016 YPN Leaders

International Women’s Day

 

On March 8th the world celebrated International Women’s Day. In the 98 years since women were granted the ability to vote by the Canadian government, women have made significant contributions to Canadian public and private life.

Take for instance, in Ontario’s political realm, thirty-seven out of 107 Members of Provincial Parliament are female, including the premier, the leader of the third party and 7 ministers. This is the highest number of female MPPs in Ontario’s history and the first time the province has elected as woman as premier.

Late last year, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau made history by appointing Canada’s first gender-balanced cabinet. Fifteen out of 31 members of his cabinet are women, many of whom are responsible for prominent portfolios.

Within our own industry, women now make up half of all real estate professionals. This is a huge jump from the early 1950s, when barely 5% of REALTORS® were female. This year, OREA has 6 female leaders on our board of directors.

 

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International Women’s Day

Ontario Launches Airbnb Pilot Project

The province is collaborating with Airbnb to raise awareness about homeowners’ and consumers’ rights when booking or offering accommodations through Airbnb. Airbnb is an online platform that allows people to list or book private accommodations.

The pilot project will create a webpage, with Ontario specific content, that will give users more information about reporting rental income, consumer protection rights under contracts, accessibility requirements and regulatory and safety obligations.

This pilot project is part of a larger consumer protection initiative by the government to harness the benefits of the sharing economy while protecting Ontarians. The government has also established a Sharing Economy Advisory Board to help Ontario seize opportunities in the rapidly expanding sharing economy.

Currently, there are more than 11,000 Airbnb hosts in Ontario. The average host makes approximately $280 a month on this online platform. Last year, more than 375,000 visitors used Airbnb to book accommodations in Ontario.

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Ontario Launches Airbnb Pilot Project

Town continues to work with community partners to reduce coyote conflicts

Thursday, February 4, 2016 – for immediate release

Town continues to work with community partners to reduce coyote conflicts

Following a community open house held in January 2016 to address residents’ concerns about recent coyote sightings, the town has stepped up measures to help minimize human-coyote conflicts.

“There is an understandable concern when coyotes become habituated. There are a number of things we can all do that, if embraced by the entire community, can ensure a more peaceful coexistence with not just coyotes but all wildlife,” said Cindy Toth, director of Environmental Policy for the Town of Oakville.

Coyotes are typically not considered to be a significant risk to people, but intentional and unintentional feeding, tolerating them on our property, and allowing pets to roam freely contribute to coyotes losing their inhibitions and fear of people.

Since the public meeting on January 20, 2016, the town has:

posted additional coyote awareness signs in key areas where coyotes have been sighted;
installed wildlife-proof lids on town garbage bins in key areas, and continues to place lids on bins throughout the town;
sent notices to residents in key areas as a reminder to not dump household refuse or food waste in town bins, parks or trails as this encourages coyotes to frequent these areas;
increased park patrols to empty town garbage bins more frequently and monitor illegal dumping;
worked with Halton District School Board, Oakville Trafalgar High School and local property owners to help them address property standards issues and specific behaviours that may be contributing to increased coyote presence in the area;
collaborated with Oakvillegreen to provide coyote education sessions to Oakville school students and staff;
worked in partnership with HRPS to enforce town by-laws including littering, property standards, and dogs off leash;
continued to monitor coyote sightings through the town’s coyote reporting form and mapping feature to assist the Oakville & Milton Humane Society (OMHS) in locating problem coyotes.

OMHS and Halton Regional Police Services (HRPS) continue to patrol areas where coyotes are most visible to ensure safety and attempt to haze or capture problem, sick or injured animals.

Hazing is a method used to instill a fear of humans in coyotes and make your property unwelcome. This includes shouting, using noise makers, waving your arms aggressively, and throwing objects in the direction of the coyote, remembering the goal is to frighten, not harm the animal. Keeping garbage, compost, brush piles, pet food and bird feeders inaccessible also makes your property unattractive to a coyote.

The OMHS continues to respond to calls from the public and sightings reported through the town’s coyote reporting form. Residents can report a coyote sighting through the coyote reporting form page or discover where coyotes have been sighted on the coyote sightings map.

For more information on how to co-exist with wildlife, visit the coyote page.


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Town continues to work with community partners to reduce coyote conflicts