Flip Learning: It’s Simply Better

Flip a coin. Ta da! Now you have flipped learning, right? At times, the teacher wins and at other times the students wins.

Such gobbledygook makes for moments of humour but this gibberish makes light of a very serious endeavour. Competition is irrelevant in a student-centered approach. In addition, lecturing during prime time is a colossal instructional mishap.

When you flip the students’ learning, you are time-shifting lower level skills (remember Bloom’s taxonomy?), permitting more class time for students’ engagement in problem solving that draws out an application, analysis, and evaluation skills set. Talking-head presentations are transferred to multi-media resources and appliances that we all find more interesting and self-motivating.

Time in the classroom becomes a student-centred environment. Students take responsibility for reading, viewing, and listening of lower-order content and come to class prepared to struggle with targeted problems. They work in small groups, at their own pace, and are assisted by an instructor who facilitates the groups differently, in direct relation to their specific needs. Homework is performed in the classroom while one-way communication, such as lectures, take place at an individual’s discretion.

Face-to-face interaction becomes the “pursuit of knowledge,” replacing the current information dump practised in classrooms everywhere. This flipped learning model allows students to master knowledge, making full use of technological advances.

This is not traditional but neither is it revolutionary. It’s simply better.

 

Originally posted here:

Flip Learning: It’s Simply Better