Rick has been interested in real estate his whole life. He is known for being approachable and knowledgeable, he continues to be a well respected realtor by his peers, and has received numerous awards throughout his career. Knowledge is what puts Rick ahead of the competition. “I pass this knowledge onto my clients and treat every transaction as if I was buying or selling it for myself. I want to find you the best home in the best area for a fair price.” His knowledge and experience allows him to gauge buyers and sellers resulting in a satisfied client, and this is proof of his 25 year real estate career.

#BurlON til May 23

It is the first long weekend of the summer season and there are lots of…

The post #BurlON til May 23 appeared first on Tourism Burlington.

Read more: 

#BurlON til May 23

#BurlOn Sept 28-Oct 4

With the heat of the summer behind us, and more fall-like weather in the forecast,…

The post #BurlOn Sept 28-Oct 4 appeared first on Tourism Burlington.

Continued here:  

#BurlOn Sept 28-Oct 4

This Weekend in Burlington – long weekend edition (Aug 5-7)

It’s August! Better yet, it’s the August long weekend. Needing to figure out something to…

The post This Weekend in Burlington – long weekend edition (Aug 5-7) appeared first on Tourism Burlington.

Visit source:

This Weekend in Burlington – long weekend edition (Aug 5-7)

Former Hospital Site Project takes big step forward

Council endorses site master plan as well as base funding and amenities for community centre

The redevelopment project of the former Oakville-Trafalgar Memorial Hospital lands took a significant step forward at a Special Meeting last night when Town Council endorsed an overall master plan for the lands as well as the some programming and features for the Southeast Oakville Community Centre that is planned for the site.

“It is important for Council that our plan for the hospital lands reflect the needs and wishes of local residents,” said Mayor Burton. “We appreciate the thoughtful insight provided by community members throughout this consultation process, which has helped staff draft a plan that Council can fully support.”

Recently, residents from across Oakville were invited to share their thoughts on three proposed land use concepts for the overall site at a community workshop and through an online discussion forum. All three land use concepts include a community centre, a park and residential development but the arrangement was slightly different in each option.

While the feedback received was extensive both in person and online, there was no clear consensus on one particular option. However, certain themes and a common concept of establishing distinct districts did emerge with a residential district in the north, a civic district with a community centre and park in the middle, and a seniors-oriented housing district in the south.

With that in mind, the Council-endorsed former Oakville-Trafalgar Hospital Site Master Plan includes:

A residential area that complements the existing neighbourhood and maintains the character of the community as intended in the official plan.
A civic area that consolidates the community centre and parkland along Reynolds Street since it is the busiest street bounding the site, and allows the park space to be open, follow the principles of safe-park design and be highly accessible. The town also wants to explore the creation of a visible civic square in the area around the former high school. With Council’s approval of the master plan, exploration for re-use of the building will be required.
A seniors-oriented housing area that gives options for residents to down-size to smaller, more manageable properties or dwelling units without the need to leave the community. The area could range from independent seniors-living to assisted-care. Further discussions with members of the community and stakeholders will be needed to help define these opportunities.

The final master plan was also fully endorsed at last night’s meeting by the resident associations in Ward 3.

“What residents made clear during the consultation process is that the former hospital and high school played a critical role in anchoring and contributing to the neighbouring community’s identity,” added Mayor Rob Burton. “As such, the final master plan reflects the idea of maintaining that legacy for years to come.”

At last night’s meeting, Council also approved the following enhancements for the new Southeast Community Centre on the site expansion of the single gym to a double gym ($470,000); therapeutic warm-water pool ($2,740,000); fitness centre ($2,550,000) and; an indoor walking track ($1,800,000). These features are in addition to the amenities already planned for the community centre: indoor pool (to replace Centennial Pool), multi-purpose rooms and space for intergenerational programming.

A financial overview on the project was also received by Council which estimates the cost for entire project, including demolition, parking garage enhancements and community centre development, to be approximately $54 million. Town reserves are a primary funding source for this project. The sale of lands not used for a community centre or park is intended to replenish funding used from the reserve. This strategy is one way to ensure sufficient funding for other large, long term projects across the town in the future.

Moving ahead, the demolition contractors will begin site preparation this summer. The overall demolition and site remediation will take approximately 12 months to complete. The architectural/general contractor team responsible for the community centre will be selected in early July. The process of design will begin shortly afterwards. The development of the new community centre will begin in late 2018 with an opening scheduled for fall 2020.

A number of Planning Act approvals will also be necessary in order for the redevelopment of the site to proceed including official plan and zoning amendments, and draft plan of subdivision/site plan approvals. Amendments to the town’s Official Plan and Zoning By-law will be subject to the statutory planning process and a public meeting is expected in the fall with proposed Official Plan updates by the end of 2017.

The town plans on engaging with the public later this fall on the project including progress on the demolition work and next steps regarding the design of the community centre design and potential uses of the park.

Check out the June 27 Special Council Agenda for detail, including staff reports. For more information and to sign up for the town’s newsletter.


Sign up for the town’s RSS feeds

to get information delivered right to your desktop.

Originally posted here – 

Former Hospital Site Project takes big step forward

Great Backyard Birding

Great Backyard Bird Count – February 17-20 If you have 15 minutes, like birds and…

The post Great Backyard Birding appeared first on Tourism Burlington.

View the original here: 

Great Backyard Birding

Had a drink? Too tired to drive? Leave the car!

Friday, December 2, 2016 – for immediate release

Had a drink? Too tired to drive? Leave the car!

Town introduces overnight parking in Downtown and Kerr Village for the holiday season

Going to a holiday dinner or late night event this festive season just got a little easier. Evening parking after 6 p.m. is always offered at no charge in both Downtown Oakville and Kerr Village (with the exception of the Church Street parking garage), but now, until January 8, 2017, select parking lots will allow free overnight parking. All you need to do is register your licence plate and lot location at parking.oakville.ca and you can park free of charge between midnight and 9 a.m. at any of these locations:

Lot 2, on Church Street between Thomas Street and George Street in Downtown Oakville
Lot 8, on Randall Street at Reynolds Street, in Downtown Oakville
Lot 12, east of Kerr St. between Florence Drive and Washington Avenue in Kerr Village.

“Despite best intentions and planning ahead, there are still occasions when we need to leave the car behind,” said Mayor Burton. “We want to make it as easy as possible to make the right decision on those occasions. Let’s make sure everyone enjoys the holiday season safely.”

The town also has many other convenient ways to ensure safe holiday parking for you and your guests:

Temporary on-street parking permits for overnight visitors. Permits can be pre-arranged online and will allow for up to six vehicles to park on the street overnight and for up to 15 days per year for each licence plate.
A Multi-Vehicle Permit (MVP) for larger holiday festivities where more than six vehicles will need to park on the road. There is no requirement to register licence plates for MVPs, however requests must be submitted five business days in advance of the start date to allow for review and processing.

To register for these permits or learn more about parking in the Town of Oakville, visit the parking page or contact ServiceOakville at 905-845-6601.


Sign up for the town’s RSS feeds

to get information delivered right to your desktop.

Taken from:  

Had a drink? Too tired to drive? Leave the car!

Councillor Adams appointed chair of 2017 Budget Committee

Wednesday, June 29, 2016 – for immediate release

Councillor Adams appointed chair of 2017 Budget Committee

At the inaugural 2017 Budget Committee meeting on June 27, 2016, Councillor Tom Adams was appointed for a ninth consecutive year as Oakville’s budget chair. Councillor Adams holds his Master’s in Business Administration from McMaster University and is a former senior risk manager to one of Canada’s major financial institutions.

Oakville is committed to offering valued services and programs to residents and making strategic investments in community priorities. Each year the town’s annual budget is one of the most important tasks facing Town Council, and Council has directed staff to prepare a budget that keeps the overall tax increase in line with inflation.

“Keeping our finances stable, secure, and healthy is a key part of our vision to make Oakville the most livable town in Canada,” Mayor Rob Burton said. “Councillor Adams has a fantastic track record as budget chair and I am confident that his experience will help us once again meet our goal of keeping tax increases in line with inflation.”

As its first order of business, the Budget Committee received details of the 2017 process, which includes four meetings scheduled for November to provide an overview of the budget, staff presentations, and to receive delegations from the public and key stakeholders. The final staff recommended budget will be presented to Council on November 15, 2016, with Budget Committee recommendations finalized on December 6, 2016. Council approval of the operating and capital budgets is set for December 12, 2016.

“Public input is a critical piece of our annual budget process and I look forward to engaging with residents over the next few months,” Councillor Adams said. “Our key focus for this budget is to meet our goal of keeping overall property tax increases in line with inflation, while building and renewing infrastructure and maintaining high quality services for the community.”

For more information, access the staff report included in the June 27, 2016 Budget Committee meeting agenda or visit the 2017 Budget page.


Sign up for the town’s RSS feeds

to get information delivered right to your desktop.

More:

Councillor Adams appointed chair of 2017 Budget Committee

Council votes to adopt business case to explore creation of a Municipal Development Corporation

Wednesday, June 29, 2016 – for immediate release

Council votes to adopt business case to explore creation of a Municipal Development Corporation

Town to seek public input on business case

At the June 27, 2016, Council meeting, Council voted to adopt a business case outlining the key rationale for the creation of a Municipal Development Corporation (MDC) to oversee development of the town’s former public works site on Trafalgar Road. Next steps include public consultation to gather feedback on the business case, which will be included in a final recommendation report, together with financial requirements and other steps needed to create a MDC for Council consideration.

“Our research has laid the groundwork to further explore the possible benefits the MDC option could have for residents,” Mayor Rob Burton said. “Before we make a final decision, Council will take the time to review all the additional information, public feedback and other detailed requirements we’ve asked staff to present.”

Increasingly, governments are considering a “master developer” approach to dealing with significant public surplus lands in order to manage development and maximize value to the community. Local governments can implement this approach when dealing with real estate opportunities by using in house staff or by establishing a MDC pursuant to the provisions of the Municipal Act, 2001.

In 2015, the town retained N. Barry Lyon Consultants Limited (NBLC), Exp Energy Services Limited, and Black, Sutherland LLP to conduct a study on the development potential of the town’s former public works yard. The study recommended that the town assume the role of “master developer” to oversee planning and development activities for the lands. On February 1, 2016, Council endorsed the study’s conclusions and directed staff to have the consulting team explore approaches to implementing the master developer recommendation.

The key rationale for the creation of a MDC are:

the ability to negotiate effectively in the market outside of the political system;
to clearly separate the roles and mandate of town staff; and,
to separate the town’s statutory approval role from the town’s role in land development.

The business case also outlines that the MDC would operate within Town Hall but independently of other town staff, and would be managed by a part-time CEO under the direction of a Board of Directors (chaired by the Mayor), with the support of a senior management advisory team.

Should the town decide in the future to establish a MDC, it could also be used to deal with other surplus lands, including the former Brantwood School site.

For more information, review the June 20, 2016 Administrative Services Committee meeting agenda.


Sign up for the town’s RSS feeds

to get information delivered right to your desktop.

Link: 

Council votes to adopt business case to explore creation of a Municipal Development Corporation

Outstanding volunteers honoured at 15th Annual Community Spirit Awards

Thursday, June 9, 2016 – for immediate release

Outstanding volunteers honoured at 15th Annual Community Spirit Awards

Record-breaking 38 individuals, groups and organizations nominated

Oakville’s most inspiring volunteers were celebrated for their exemplary contributions to the community at the 15th Annual Community Spirit Awards held last night at Queen Elizabeth Park Community and Cultural Centre.

2016 Community Spirit Award recipients:

Nicky Lawson, Access Award sponsored by Access Abilities
Dawne Rudman, Arts Award sponsored by the Oakville Beaver
BusiWomen, Group Volunteer Award sponsored by the Town of Oakville
Greg Munz, Heritage Award sponsored by Genworth Financial Canada
James Montague, Individual Volunteer Award sponsored by Paradiso Restaurant
Fred Drews, Senior Award sponsored by the Town of Oakville
Matteo Esposito, Youth Award sponsored by RBC Royal Bank

“On behalf of Council, I congratulate both the nominees and recipients of the Community Spirit Awards,” said Mayor Rob Burton. “Oakville’s volunteer participation rate is consistently above the provincial and national averages. Our town is a better, more livable place for their commitment and dedication.”

Chris Mei, television host of the Weather Network, was the emcee for the evening, entertaining the audience while sponsors handed out the awards. Each recipient received a one-of-a-kind award designed by local furniture and wood-working artists Joseph Bauman and Dayna Gedney.

More information

Since 2002, Oakville’s Community Spirit Awards have recognized individuals and groups for their outstanding contributions to the community. Visit the Oakville Community Spirit Awards page for more details.


Sign up for the town’s RSS feeds

to get information delivered right to your desktop.

Visit site – 

Outstanding volunteers honoured at 15th Annual Community Spirit Awards

Town to fight the development of the Saw-Whet Golf Course

Monday, April 13, 2015 – for immediate release

Town to fight the development of the Saw-Whet Golf Course

Development application from Bronte Green Corporation considered premature and not in the public interest

Town Council has directed staff to fight Bronte Green Corporation’s application to develop a new subdivision on the existing Saw-Whet Golf Course. Ontario Municipal Board (OMB) hearings on the application are scheduled to get underway on October 13, 2015, with the next pre-hearing scheduled for May 1, 2015. Bronte Green Corporation took its application to the OMB after the town did not consider the application within the timeframe specified in the Planning Act. The complexity of the required studies, and the developer’s delay in providing the required studies, led to significant delays in the overall process.

“Council cannot in good conscience consider a development application when all of the required studies are not yet complete,” Mayor Rob Burton said. “We are committed to taking an evidence-based approach to decision making, and we are confident that the OMB will agree that this is the right approach to take when we are making decisions that will impact our community for generations to come.”

Council also directed staff to schedule a public meeting to look at designating the publicly-owned lands within the study area with the appropriate natural heritage designation. This process would smooth the way for these lands to be considered as part of the ten year review of the provincial Greenbelt Plan.

The proposed Bronte Green application covers 55.1 hectares of land and proposes over 750 new residential units.


Sign up for the town’s RSS feeds

to get information delivered right to your desktop.

More: 

Town to fight the development of the Saw-Whet Golf Course