#BurlON til July 10

The summer is off to a great start in #BurlON and the first long weekend…

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#BurlON til July 10

#BurlON til Jan2

Christmas will soon be here and there is no better place to celebrate the season…

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#BurlON til Jan2

What’s Inside? Doors Open Burlington

On Saturday, September 29, 2018, 12 sites across Burlington will open their doors and give…

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What’s Inside? Doors Open Burlington

Fall Fun Burlington 2017

The temperatures might feel more like summer these past few days but fall officially starts soon…

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Fall Fun Burlington 2017

Council endorses Rogers Hometown Hockey event in downtown Oakville

Tuesday, May 30, 2017 – for immediate release

Council endorses Rogers Hometown Hockey event in downtown Oakville

Staff receives green light to proceed with plans for outdoor celebration in December 2017

Oakville hockey fans of all ages will have a chance to showcase their love of the game when the Rogers Hometown Hockey celebration comes to town this winter.

Town Council authorized staff to sign a letter of agreement with the Hometown Hockey event organizers that will see the outdoor festival visit Downtown Oakville during a weekend in December. The date will be confirmed once the NHL schedule is released in June.

Rogers Hometown Hockey is a two-day festival that celebrates Canada’s passion for hockey with a weekend of free outdoor activities. The festival will feature games, interactive experiences, and live entertainment for the whole family culminating with an outdoor viewing party of an NHL game broadcast live from the Sportsnet Mobile Studio with Ron MacLean and co-host Tara Slone.

“This event is a fantastic opportunity to celebrate hockey in Oakville, attract thousands of people downtown during the Christmas shopping season, and showcase our town to a national audience,” said Mayor Rob Burton.

Council also approved $96,000 in funding to cover costs associated with hosting the event such as marketing, parking, police, site security and a transit shuttle service.

Staff is working with the Hometown Hockey production team to confirm which area in downtown Oakville is most suitable for the event site. The event dates and location will be announced later this summer.


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Council endorses Rogers Hometown Hockey event in downtown Oakville

Draft Cultural Heritage Landscapes assessments completed on six high-priority properties

Thursday, April 13, 2017 – for immediate release

Draft Cultural Heritage Landscapes assessments completed on six high-priority properties

Report will go to Heritage Oakville Advisory Committee on Tuesday, April 25, 2017

The Town of Oakville today released the draft Phase Two Cultural Heritage Landscape Assessments undertaken on six high-priority properties identified for further study by the Phase One Cultural Heritage Landscape Inventory endorsed by Council on February 2016. The research for this phase of the project was undertaken by Letourneau Heritage Consulting.

A cultural heritage landscape is a geographical area of heritage significance that has been modified by human activities and is valued by a community for the important contribution they make to our understanding of the history of a place, an event, or a people. The six properties considered in this phase of the project were:

Bowbeer Farmstead (1086 Burnhamthorpe Road East)
Raydor Estate / Glen Abbey (1333 Dorval Drive)
McMichael Farm (3367 Dundas Street West)
Hilton Farm (2031 North Service Road West)
Biggar Farm (4243 Sixth Line)
Remnant Farmstead (3451 Tremaine Road)

The report on the draft Phase Two Cultural Heritage Landscapes Assessments will be considered by Heritage Oakville Advisory Committee on April 25, 2017. The meeting will take place at Town Hall, Council Chamber, beginning at 9:30 a.m. The recommendations from Heritage Oakville and staff will go forward to Council for consideration at its meeting of May 15, 2017.

“The town’s Heritage Oakville Advisory Committee has a critical role to play in reviewing the evidence provided by the heritage consultant in this phase of the process,” Mayor Burton said. “Council looks forward to receiving the committee’s advice and feedback.”

The Provincial Policy Statement requires that significant cultural heritage landscapes be conserved. Phase Two assessments provide an evidentiary basis, if any, on which Council could proceed with any protection measures in Phase Three, such as Official Plan policies or designation under the Ontario Heritage Act.

To register to speak at the Heritage Oakville Advisory Committee meeting of April 25, 2017, please call 905-815-6015 or email townclerk@oakville.ca by 4:30 p.m. the day prior to the meeting.

To register to speak at the Planning and Development Council meeting of May 15, 2017, please call 905-815-6015 or email townclerk@oakville.ca by noon the day of the meeting.

For more information visit our Cultural Heritage Landscapes strategy page.


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Draft Cultural Heritage Landscapes assessments completed on six high-priority properties

Town prepares for reconstruction of Lakeshore Road Bridge at Sixteen Mile Creek

Wednesday, January 18, 2017 – for immediate release

Town prepares for reconstruction of Lakeshore Road Bridge at Sixteen Mile Creek

Bridge closes the week of January 30; reopens December 2017

During the week of January 30, 2017, the Lakeshore Road Bridge over Sixteen Mile Creek will be closed until December 2017 to motorists, cyclists and pedestrians in both directions. The bridge is being reconstructed as part of the overall Lakeshore Road Reconstruction and Streetscape project.

A detour route around the bridge will be provided via Kerr Street, Rebecca Street and Navy Street. All businesses, the library, the theatre and Centennial Pool remain open and accessible during construction.

“The town is moving forward with a much needed project to reconstruct Lakeshore Road East starting with the bridge. Changing the streetscape in downtown Oakville will help pave the way for a revitalized downtown,” said Mayor Rob Burton. “We appreciate everyone’s patience during construction and remind you that it is business as usual in downtown Oakville.”

Once complete, the new bridge will include two travel lanes and bikes lanes. There will also be a wider pedestrian sidewalk with a barrier wall to separate the sidewalk and vehicular traffic. New pedestrian railings and lookouts will be included as well as LED lighting. The Lakeshore Road approaches to the bridge between Navy Street and Forsythe Street will also be reconstructed.

On January 5, 2017, in preparation for the bridge closure, Navy Street was permanently converted to two-way traffic between Lakeshore and Rebecca/Randall streets. Signs are posted around the area to notify drivers of the change. As part of the Council approved Downtown Transportation and Streetscape Study (DTS), Navy Street is one of several streets in downtown Oakville scheduled to be converted to two-way operation. The other streets are still in the detailed design phase and are scheduled to be converted in 2018.

Another addition to Downtown Oakville is the new pedestrian crossover device at the intersection of Navy Street and Church Street (in front of Centennial Square). Several new crossovers are planned to be installed across town in 2017 starting with the Navy and Church street location. Pedestrian crossovers have specific pavement markings and crossing signs. There are three types of crossovers. The crossover at Navy and Church has poles, flashing beacons above the signs and pedestrian push buttons. Unlike pedestrian crosswalks at traffic signal locations, at a crossover, drivers and cyclists must stop behind the yield line and wait until the pedestrian completely crosses the road before proceeding.

With Lakeshore Road East (Navy Street to Allan Street) coming to the end of its lifespan and needing a major reconstruction, the town undertook extensive research and public consultation to identify broader opportunities to improve traffic, beautify streets and improve pedestrian/cycle ways in the downtown. In October 2015, Council approved the Lakeshore Road Reconstruction and Streetscape Project as part of the Downtown Transportation and Streetscape Study (DTS) study. The Lakeshore Bridge at Sixteen Mile Creek reconstruction is taking place in advance of the road project as inspections of the bridge revealed its condition warrants immediate attention.

For details about this project, please visit the Lakeshore Road Bridge Reconstruction page. Additional information will be posted online as the projects progress. You can also contact ServiceOakville at 905-845-6601.


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Town prepares for reconstruction of Lakeshore Road Bridge at Sixteen Mile Creek

Council approves group home registration by-law to support neighbourhood cohesion

Tuesday, December 13, 2016 – for immediate release

Council approves group home registration by-law to support neighbourhood cohesion

In an effort to facilitate neighbourhood communication and cohesion, Council passed a new by-law — Group Home Registration By-law 2016-11 — that will see the town collecting business names, ownership and contact details of group homes in Oakville. Under the new by-law, town municipal enforcement services staff can respond to community questions and concerns by connecting residents with the group home operators. This quick intervention often leads to better community understanding and cooperation.

“In recent years, Council and staff have heard a number of concerns regarding activities at local group homes. Resolving these issues proved difficult because we did not know where exactly these homes were, or how to contact their operator,” Mayor Rob Burton said. “Our new bylaw will provide staff with much needed contact information to encourage dialogue and resolutions between neighbours.”

Under the town’s bylaw, a group home business license application/renewal must include a business name, ownership and contact information. The annual application/renewal fee is $93. Ownership and contact information collected through the licensing process will not be shared without the consent of the group home operator but is subject to normal Municipal Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act requests.

A group home is defined as a supervised single housekeeping unit in a residential dwelling for the accommodation of three to10 persons, exclusive of staff, who by reason of their emotional, mental, social or physical condition or legal status, require a group living arrangement for their well-being

Although licensed by the Province, group homes are most often owned privately by a group home operator or a service agency subject to a service agreement. Service agreements outline responsibilities of group homes and may require the development of processes for dealing with resident concerns as well as inspections to ensure compliance with ministry standards including training of staff, documentation, files, interior maintenance of the home and overall safety.

According to the Municipal Act 2001, municipalities are only permitted to register a group home, but not regulate it. The town’s zoning by-law permits group homes in all residential zones, which is consistent with recent case law dealing with group home regulation.

For more information, review the staff report in the December 5, 2016 Administrative Services Committee agenda.


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Council approves group home registration by-law to support neighbourhood cohesion

Canada’s Largest Ribfest 2016

Over the past 21 years, Canada’s Largest Ribfest has become a Labour Day weekend tradition here in Burlington.  In 2009, Ribfest broke attendance records with over 175,000 in attendance, over 150,000 lbs of ribs sold and over $3 million dollars has been … Continue reading →

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Canada’s Largest Ribfest 2016

Ray Chisholm sworn in as Ward 2 Town Councillor

Tuesday, April 19, 2016 – for immediate release

Ray Chisholm sworn in as Ward 2 Town Councillor

Ray Chisholm was officially sworn in as the new Ward 2 Town Councillor at the Town of Oakville’s Planning and Development Council meeting on April 18, 2016.

“On behalf of the Town of Oakville and Members of Council, I would like to congratulate Ray Chisholm on his success in the Ward 2 by-election and welcome him to Council,” Mayor Rob Burton said. “His previous experience with the town and in the community will be an asset in achieving our vision to be Canada’s most livable town. I, along with the rest of Council, look forward to working with Ray.”

Councillor Chisholm was elected on April 11, 2016, during the Municipal Ward 2 By-election. Results were officially certified by the Town Clerk on April 14, 2016.

Information about the 2016 Municipal Ward 2 By-election, including voting statistics and election results can be found on the Elections page.


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Ray Chisholm sworn in as Ward 2 Town Councillor