Spring On Stage in #BurlON

Enjoy some great theatre, music and entertainment in Burlington this spring by taking in a…

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Spring On Stage in #BurlON

#BurlON til Apr 3

Spring has sprung! Enjoy some time outdoors at one of our parks, or visit the…

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#BurlON til Apr 3

#BurlON til Jan 9

A new year means new fun things to see and do in #BurlON. With kids…

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#BurlON til Jan 9

Ring in 2019 in #BurlON

The last holiday of the year and it is my personal favourite – New Year’s!…

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Ring in 2019 in #BurlON

Family Day 2018 in #BurlON

The Family Day weekend will soon be here and it a great time to reconnect…

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Family Day 2018 in #BurlON

OMB approves Bronte Green application for development of former Saw-Whet Golf Course lands

Thursday, July 6, 2017 – for immediate release

OMB approves Bronte Green application for development of former Saw-Whet Golf Course lands

Decision approves settlement negotiated last fall

The Ontario Municipal Board (OMB) has released its decision formally approving the negotiated settlement that was reached between the Town of Oakville, the Region of Halton, Conservation Halton and Bronte Green last fall concerning the development of the lands at 1401 Bronte Road.

“The OMB’s decision to approve the town’s settlement with Bronte Green was the best possible outcome that we could achieve at the OMB,” Mayor Burton said. “In the settlement, Bronte Green agreed to significant concessions to respond to all of the issues raised by the town including protecting green space and addressing key environmental concerns over wildlife and flood protection. While it would have been desirable to preserve all this land, legally that was simply not possible in this case.”

The approved development proposal permits Bronte Green to build a residential community with limited retail, and a mix of single family homes, townhouses and low-rise apartments located on Bronte Road. This proposed transit-friendly community will also include a school, parks and a trail system while preserving sensitive environmental lands that are critical habitat to endangered and other species of wildlife.

The town had opposed the original Bronte Green application as being premature and not in the public interest. This position was based on serious concerns with the draft plan and the underlying technical studies. The town engaged a team of 15 witnesses representing a variety of scientific and planning disciplines to put forth its case.

Following extensive negotiations, Bronte Green made significant changes to its original development proposal to reflect the concerns raised by the Town of Oakville, Region of Halton, Conservation Halton and the community. These changes included:

Dedicating a significant parcel of land to enhance the woodlands
Creating a high value habitat for species including snapping turtles.
Increasing the size of the buffer around the natural features from 10 to 30 metres in order to better protect the natural heritage system from the impacts of development and to reduce flood and erosion impacts.
Constructing storm water management systems which insure that there will be no additional risk of downstream flooding.
Removing the vehicular bridge previously proposed over the Fourteen Mile Creek which posed a threat to endangered species of fish.
Securing a permanent natural heritage linkage to Bronte Creek Provincial Park.
Reserving an elementary school site adjacent to a centrally located neighbourhood park.
Increasing density on portions of the site to support transit-friendly development along Bronte Road, and preserve more parkland

For more information visit the Bronte Green Corporation development application page.


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OMB approves Bronte Green application for development of former Saw-Whet Golf Course lands

Councillor Adams appointed chair of 2018 Budget Committee

Town plans for continued inflation level tax increases

At the inaugural 2018 Budget Committee meeting on June 26, 2017, Councillor Tom Adams was appointed as Oakville’s budget chair for the tenth consecutive year. Councillor Adams holds his Master’s in Business Administration from McMaster University and is a former senior risk manager to one of Canada’s major financial institutions.

Oakville is committed to offering valued services and programs to residents and making strategic investments in community priorities. Each year the town’s budget is one of the most important tasks facing Town Council, who have directed staff to prepare a budget that keeps the overall tax increase in line with inflation. The target for 2018 has been set at an overall property tax increase of 1.8 per cent, including the town, Regional and educational shares of the property tax bill.

Key budget pressures outlined by Nancy Sully, deputy treasurer and director, Financial Planning, include $1.4 million to implement the increased minimum wage announced recently by the Province, and $1.3 million in costs related to growth in the town including the operation of new transit vehicles, the cost to maintain new parks and roads, as well as costs associated with operating the new Trafalgar Park Community Centre (redeveloped Oakville Arena) and a proposed library.

The town will be looking at transforming the way services are delivered in order to respond to budget pressures in 2019 and 2020 relating to Trafalgar Park and the opening of the Southeast Community Centre (on the former hospital lands), a new fire station in Palermo, as well as other funding needs. Council has directed staff to keep overall property tax increases in line with inflation in both 2019 and 2020.

“The town is at the point where we must move beyond simple cost containment measures to keep tax increases at the rate of inflation in future years,” said CAO Ray Green. “Council, staff and the community will need to work together to set priorities, and look for opportunities to transform the way we deliver services.”

Green recommended a comprehensive reshaping of the organization that will enable the town to meet the overall budget target set by Council and create a longer-term vision for the financial sustainability of town operations.

“Oakville is recognized as having the healthiest finances in Ontario, and keeping those finances strong and secure is a key part of Council’s vision to make Oakville the most livable town in Canada,” said Mayor Rob Burton. “Staff have made us aware of potential pressures on the horizon, and recommended we take proactive steps to address them. We are confident that taking early action will help assure the long-term health of Oakville’s finances.”

Staff noted that the 2018 budget documents would be released on November 21, 2017. Staff will present the Budget Committee with an overview of the proposed 2018 operating and capital budgets, including opportunities for potential savings or increased revenues. The Budget Committee will hear input from pubic delegations before making a recommendation on December 12, 2017 to Council. Final Council approval of the operating and capital budgets is scheduled for December 18, 2017.

“Our key focus for this budget is to meet our goal of keeping overall property tax increases in line with inflation, while building and renewing infrastructure and maintaining high quality services for the community,” Councillor Adams said. “Public input is a critical piece of our annual budget process and I look forward to engaging with residents over the next few months.”

For more information, access the staff report included in the June 26, 2017 Budget Committee meeting agenda or visit the 2018 Budget page.


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This Weekend in Burlington – June 24/25

June 21st was  the longest day of the year and the first official day of…

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This Weekend in Burlington – June 24/25

Oakville Children’s Festival moves to QEPCCC due to flooding

Thursday, May 18, 2017 – for immediate release

Oakville Children’s Festival moves to QEPCCC due to flooding

High water levels also impacting event permits for lakeside parks

As a result of rising lake levels and ongoing flooding at Coronation Park, the Town of Oakville is relocating the 2017 Oakville Children’s Festival to the grounds of the Queen Elizabeth Park Community and Cultural Centre (QEPCCC) on Sunday, July 9 from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.

“We don’t expect lake levels to recede until mid-summer which means Coronation Park will likely experience more flooding in the coming weeks,” said Sarah Douglas-Murray, senior manager of Cultural Services. “Unfortunately there is not enough dry space in the park to accommodate all the festival activities and we’ve determined that QEPCCC offers the best alternative location.”

The move to QEPCCC, located at 2302 Bridge Road, will not impact the Oakville Children’s Festival line-up of free entertainment designed to encourage children and families to explore and discover arts and culture. All the event details including special guests, performances and activities will be announced early next week.

Wet conditions in Coronation Park, Bronte Heritage Park, Lions Valley Park and Gairloch Gardens have also impacted permitted events booked over the next few weeks such as wedding photo shoots and picnics. Town staff are working with permit holders to reschedule or relocate their events. While lakefront parks remain open and accessible to the public, some areas are cordoned off with caution tape or fencing due to ponding water and saturated ground conditions.

Canada Day celebrations will remain in Bronte Heritage Park. The town is working with the Bronte Business Improvement Association to make any necessary adjustments to activities that may be impacted by further flooding.

Residents are encouraged to our Oakville Children’s Festival page for the latest updates on closures or contact ServiceOakville at 905-845-6601 or ServiceOakville@oakville.ca.


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Town achieves highest standard in performance data collection

Tuesday, May 2, 2017 – for immediate release

Town achieves highest standard in performance data collection

ISO 37120 Platinum certification reflects commitment to transparency and innovation

Oakville joins the ranks of cities across the globe after receiving the prestigious ISO 37120 platinum certification, the world’s first international standard for sustainable cities, from the World Council on City Data (WCCD). Oakville is the fourth Ontario municipality to receive this designation, and is the first International Organization of Standardization (ISO) achievement for the town.

“This certification is a significant achievement for Oakville that reflects Council’s commitment to innovation and transparency as we work to create Canada’s most livable town,” Mayor Rob Burton said. “Our involvement with the WCCD will help us measure how well we’re meeting the needs of our citizens, track our progress over time and benchmark our performance against other world-class cities.”

ISO 37120 Sustainable Development of Communities: Indicators for City Services and Quality of Life is comprised of 100 performance indicators that track a city’s progress in delivering services and ensuring quality of life for its community. Platinum certification acknowledges that the town has achieved the highest standard in data collection and research to drive the delivery of high quality programs and services to the community.

As a global leader on standardized metrics, the WCCD manages the ISO 37120 certification system and Global Cities Registry that hosts data from approximately 40 cities around the world, to enable a municipality and its residents to compare its social, economic and environmental performance in relation to other cities. Data now available shows that Oakville is leading the way in areas including the number of higher education degrees per 100,000 population (about one in two citizens has a higher education degree), total electrical energy use per capita (Oakville is one of the most efficient communities) and total number of bike paths/lanes per 100,000 population (among the highest of cities worldwide).

There is a wide range of certification levels offered by the WCCD for cities to aspire to and levels are based on the number of indicators reported by the city. To achieve platinum certification, the highest level, the town provided data on over 90 indicators that was validated through a third-party verification process.

During her presentation to Council, Dr. Patricia McCarney, president and CEO of World Council on City Data, commended the town’s commitment open data and efforts to pursue certification. “It is my pleasure to welcome the Town of Oakville to the World Council on City Data as an ISO 37120 platinum certified municipality. The dedication of Mayor Burton, Town Council and staff to open, standardized and comparable city data will help to increase the quality of life for all citizens while driving evidence-based decision making and data driven solutions. The town stands out in Canada and globally as a leader in working to create a more smart, sustainable, resilient, inclusive and prosperous future for its residents.”

Quick Facts

The WCCD was founded in 2014 – ISO 37120 was piloted by 20 WCCD Foundation Cities throughout the world
Based on eight years of development by the Global City Indicators Facility and later the Global Cities Institute at the University of Toronto
ISO 37120 is the first ISO standard on cities
Comprises 100 indicators (54 core, 46 supporting) around 17 themes on city sustainability and quality of life

To view Oakville’s data and to learn more about ISO 37120, visit the World Council on City Data website. To learn more about the town’s commitment to open data, visit our Open Data page..


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